The Senate Judiciary Committee establishes a hearing for Trump's nominee for the Supreme Court

The hearing on Bret Kavanaugh's nomination to the Supreme Court will begin on September 4.

The chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee announced Friday that the hearing on Bret Kavanaugh's nomination to the Supreme Court would begin on September 4, angering Democratic lawmakers who say Republicans are moving too fast in the appointment.

The hearing on Bret Kavanaugh's nomination to the Supreme Court will begin on September 4.

The hearing on Bret Kavanaugh's nomination to the Supreme Court will begin on September 4.

Sen. Chuck Grassley said in a statement that committee members and the nominee would make opening remarks on the first day of the procedure, and Kavanaugh will be questioned the next day.

Character witnesses and legal experts will take positions after that, the Republican senator said, ending what is expected to be three or four consecutive days of testimony.

Grassley said his announcement follows the largest cumulative production of Executive Branch material ever received in the course of evaluating a Supreme Court nominee. and that the review would be carried out later than the Senate hearings on recently confirmed judges.

It was said that Kavanaugh was waiting to testify for a White House spokesperson.

The Democrats accused the Republican president in unison of "hiding important information" about the judge who worked in the Bush administration and whose communications from that moment have not received it at all.

Sen. Chuck Grassley said in a statement that committee members and the nominee would make opening remarks on the first day of the procedure, and that Kavanaugh would be questioned the next day.

Sen. Chuck Grassley said in a statement that committee members and the nominee would make opening remarks on the first day of the procedure, and that Kavanaugh would be questioned the next day.

Sen. Chuck Grassley said in a statement that committee members and the nominee would make opening remarks on the first day of the procedure, and that Kavanaugh would be questioned the next day.

The committee is working on a subset of documents that were delivered to Congress by the office of the former president and the National Archives. It would take almost two months after Grassely's announced hearing day for the government to hand over all of Kavanaugh's communications of his time as a staff secretary to the Bush administration.

President Trump wants to have Kavanaugh seated in time for the period beginning in October 2018. The conservative judge is expected to cast the deciding vote in cases involving the Republican president and his agenda.

Grassley said Friday that the volume of documents produced by former President George W. Bush and the Archives collection is more than enough for senators to cast informed votes on the appointment of the D.C. district court judge.

"My team has already reviewed every page of the more than 4,800 pages of judicial opinions that Judge Kavanaugh wrote, more than 6,400 pages of opinions to which he joined, more than 125,000 pages of records produced from his legal service of the White House and more than 17,000 pages in response to the most complete questionnaire ever presented to a candidate, "said the Iowa Republican." He's a head judge. He has a record of judicial independence and applies the law as written. He has met with dozens of senators who only have positive things to say.

Grassley said: "It is time for the American people to hear directly from Judge Kavanaugh at his public hearing."

Protesters hold signs when they meet in front of the Supreme Court in Washington after President Donald Trump announced Judge Brett Kavanaugh as a Supreme Court nominee on July 9. Concerned about the prospect of a reconfigured court, proponents of abortion are stepping up their efforts to block judging who would be a strong conservative vote in the high court

Protesters hold signs when they meet in front of the Supreme Court in Washington after President Donald Trump announced Judge Brett Kavanaugh as a Supreme Court nominee on July 9. Concerned about the prospect of a reconfigured court, proponents of abortion are stepping up their efforts to block judging who would be a strong conservative vote in the high court

Protesters hold signs when they meet in front of the Supreme Court in Washington after President Donald Trump announced Judge Brett Kavanaugh as a Supreme Court nominee on July 9. Concerned about the prospect of a reconfigured court, proponents of abortion are stepping up their efforts to block judging who would be a strong conservative vote in the high court

The senators' position on the nomination of Kavanaugh from President Trump in July has been almost completely divided along the lines of the party. The GOP is seeking to eliminate some Democrats in danger in the states that the president won in 2016, however, to reinforce his position.

Democratic leaders tried to stop a hearing until after the November elections in the hope that interim periods will leave the Republican Party in a weaker position.

Grassley has firmly rejected his position and said Friday that Kavanaugh's hearing would be 57 days after his appointment.

A statement from his office said hearings on the three most recent Supreme Court justices – Sonia Sotomayor, Elena Kagan and Neil Gorsuch – took place 48-49 days after their presidential nominations.

Democrats have focused on Kavanaugh's work for independent advisor Kenneth Starr in his attempts to curb his nomination process. They say they must have access to all their official communications about the investigation of former President Bill Clinton before his appointment can be properly evaluated.

Grassley joined the Democrats in the request for information, but decided to move forward in a hearing when the National Archives said he could submit the full tranche of the documents before the Aug. 15 deadline. He said he would need until the end of October to review the complete communications cache.

The leader of the senatorial minority, Chuck Schumer, speaks at the rally to stop Kavanaugh on the west front of Capital Hill on August 1. Schumer accused Friday that the Republicans were in a wild race to hold hearings after unilaterally blocking most judges. Kavanaugh records of public publication

The leader of the senatorial minority, Chuck Schumer, speaks at the rally to stop Kavanaugh on the west front of Capital Hill on August 1. Schumer accused Friday that the Republicans were in a wild race to hold hearings after unilaterally blocking most judges. Kavanaugh records of public publication

The leader of the senatorial minority, Chuck Schumer, speaks at the rally to stop Kavanaugh on the west front of Capital Hill on August 1. Schumer accused Friday that the Republicans were in a wild race to hold hearings after unilaterally blocking most judges. Kavanaugh records of public publication

The leader of the Senate minority, Chuck Schumer, denounced that the Republicans were in a "crazy race" to hold hearings after "deciding unilaterally to block the publication of almost all the records of Judge Kavanaugh."

He said it is "more evidence that they are hiding important information from the American people" and that the action "stuns the mind."

"What are you hiding?" He asked.

Schumer said the "vast majority" of the documents that the Senate will have "will be chosen by a Republican agent who currently works for President George W. Bush, and who also happens to be the former deputy of Kavanaugh."

"Republican efforts to make this the least transparent and most secret Supreme Court nomination in history continue," Schumer said. "They seem to be more afraid of this nominee's history and history than anyone we've considered."

The documents of the Presidential Library of Bush are being reviewed by a team of lawyers and the process is led by the representative of the former Republican president, Bill Burck.

Senator Dianne Feinstein, the highest ranking Democrat on the Senate Judiciary Committee, reprimanded the Republicans on the panel for accelerating her consideration of Kavanaugh for a lifetime appointment.

"Schedule a hearing in early September, while more than 99 percent of Kavanaugh's records in the White House are not yet available, not only unprecedented but a further slump in Republican efforts to stack up in court "he said on Friday.

The candidate for the US Supreme Court UU Brett Kavanaugh meets with Senator Joni Ernst (R-IA) at his Senate offices before the confirmation hearings of the Senate Judiciary Committee in this photo taken on July 31

The candidate for the US Supreme Court UU Brett Kavanaugh meets with Senator Joni Ernst (R-IA) at his Senate offices before the confirmation hearings of the Senate Judiciary Committee in this photo taken on July 31

The candidate for the US Supreme Court UU Brett Kavanaugh meets with Senator Joni Ernst (R-IA) at his Senate offices before the confirmation hearings of the Senate Judiciary Committee in this photo taken on July 31

"It is a sad situation that, for the first time, President Grassley has decided to go on his own and adopt a partisan approach, producing the least amount of documents for the public."

The chief accountant for Democrats in the Senate, Minority Whip Dick Durbin, said the process that Republicans are using to review Kavanaugh is "unprecedented and unfair to the American people."

He said the Senate Republicans want to conclude the nomination before the National Archives publish all of Kavanaugh's communications in the White House.

"These documents may have a direct bearing on the credibility of Judge Kavanaugh's sworn testimony, not to mention his legal opinions and temperament." The American people deserve to know the true story of the man seeking a lifetime appointment to the highest court in the earth.

"However, it is clear that in the record of Judge Kavanaugh in the White House there are things that the Senate Republicans do not want the American people to see," Durbin said.

He also asked, "What are you hiding? & # 39;

Sen. John Cornyn, the Republican whip, pledged once again on Friday to have a confirmation vote in the Senate plenary before October 1.

White House spokesman Raj Shah said in a statement that Kavanaugh "waits" three and a half weeks to sit in front of the senators.

"With the Senate already reviewing more documents than for any other Supreme Court nominee in history, President Grassley has kept his promise to lead an open, transparent and fair process," Shah said. "Judge Kavanaugh hopes to be able to address the Judiciary Committee in public hearings for the American people to see."

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