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The second emu is quite around in Doncaster

SECOND Emu is on the loose in Doncaster days after a six-foot bird named Ethel, who dodged police and RSPCA for six days, was captured near primary school

  • A second emu has been seen on the run just days after Ethel was recaptured
  • Ethel, who belonged to Kerry Dobson, sat down with questions for almost a whole week
  • This emu “does not belong to Mrs. Dobson” and the police say there has been no report

A second emu has been roaming free near Doncaster just days after another bird was caught after six days on the run.

Residents of Sprotbrough, near Doncaster, South Yorkshire, shared photos and videos of the large bird roaming fields off the A1.

Ethel, owned by Kerry Dobson, was the first to go on the run for almost a whole week before being taken home.

Friends of Mrs. Dobson posted that this second emu does not belong to Ms. Dobson, who reported Ethel’s disappearance to the RSPCA and the police.

New sightings of a second emu were posted to Facebook in the very same area where Ethel was spotted

New sightings of a second emu were posted to Facebook in the very same area where Ethel was spotted

Ethel wandered around for nearly a week before being found near an elementary school Monday night

Ethel wandered around for nearly a week before being found near an elementary school Monday night

Ethel wandered around for nearly a week before being found near an elementary school Monday night

“I just texted Kerry and it’s not hers because she said at home to put a bucket of water in front of it,” said a post on the Sprotbrough Hub Community Group page.

Locals fear that emus left to roam could cause an accident, especially considering the second bird is so close to the A1.

Police said no report had been made of a second escape.

Jane Davies said, “If you can’t keep them in a safe place, don’t keep them.

“This is getting ridiculous.”

Ethel had gone on quite a journey after being accidentally let out of her quarters by construction workers.

She went from through Newlands Park to the Trans Pennine Trail at Cosworth before going 10 miles east to Dunscroft.

The Facebook group ‘Our Sprotbrough’ showed tons of posts from people who had seen her until she was finally found at a primary school on Monday night.

The RSPCA believes it is highly unlikely that there are any wild emus in Britain, so the second bird is likely an escaped pet as well.

Emus can reach speeds of up to 30 mph and are mostly found in warm climates such as Australia, New Guinea, Indonesia, the Solomon Islands and the Philippines.

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Emus are among the largest birds in the world. The species is mainly found in Australia, but is also found in New Guinea, Indonesia, the Solomon Islands and the Philippines.

They are members of the ratite family, which also includes ostriches, cassowaries and rheas.

The emus’ gray-to-brown feathers help protect them from the sun’s rays so they can survive in warm climates.

They also live in grasslands, savannas, and forests and prefer areas with access to water.

These omnivores mate and nest during the Australian winter. Females are known to fight viciously over unpaired males and mating pairs stay together for up to five months.

The male hatches the egg while the female often goes out to find another mating partner within the season.

Source: National Geographic

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