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The school room of Adelaide will be a temporary home for more than 100 koalas who have survived forest fires

More than 100 koalas burned in forest fires in South Australia are cared for in an improvised hospital in a primary school.

Adelaide Koala Rescue, which saved koalas from the Cudlee Creek fire with burnt legs and no access to food, treats the animals at Paradise Primary School, northeast of Adelaide.

The improvised koala hospital has 150 volunteers from all over Australia and is desperately looking for a separate home when it reaches its capacity.

The hospital has already discharged 35 patients – whose names are now displayed at the door of the hall – although some were unable to return to their decimated homes.

Adelaide Koala Rescue rescued koalas from the Cudlee Creek fire and settled in a Campbelltown school gym, northeast of Adelaide, to take care of marsupials

Adelaide Koala Rescue rescued koalas from the Cudlee Creek fire and settled in a Campbelltown school gym, northeast of Adelaide, to take care of marsupials

The improvised koala hospital has 150 volunteers from all over Australia and is desperately looking for a new home when it reaches its capacity

The improvised koala hospital has 150 volunteers from all over Australia and is desperately looking for a new home when it reaches its capacity

The improvised koala hospital has 150 volunteers from all over Australia and is desperately looking for a new home when it reaches its capacity

The hospital has already discharged 35 patients - whose names are now proudly displayed at the door of the hall - although some were unable to return to their decimated homes

The hospital has already discharged 35 patients - whose names are now proudly displayed at the door of the hall - although some were unable to return to their decimated homes

The hospital has already discharged 35 patients – whose names are now proudly displayed at the door of the hall – although some were unable to return to their decimated homes

But almost three weeks after the fire first broke through the hills, injured koalas still arrive daily.

“A few have just come in and have just been singing everywhere,” said Jane Brister, director of Adelaide Koala Rescue, Wednesday.

“It’s almost like they were curled into a ball when the flames, the heat, just went over the top of them.”

The heaviest wounded koalas escaped the flames by climbing to the top of trees, but burned their legs as they descended the scorching tree trunk or were looking for food on charred land below.

Caring for the injured can be heartbreaking work. Some koalas that are brought to the center are in a condition so severe that they have to be euthanized.

Mrs Brister said the volunteers found the experience “overwhelming and in some cases moving”.

“We have many people in our team who have seen things they cannot see, who need guidance,” she said.

“We have team members who are traumatized because they want to be outside 24/7.”

Almost three weeks after the fire was first pulled through the hills, injured koalas still arrive daily

Almost three weeks after the fire was first pulled through the hills, injured koalas still arrive daily

Almost three weeks after the fire was first pulled through the hills, injured koalas still arrive daily

Adelaide Koala Rescue is active all year round and usually treats up to 35 patients at a given time.

Since the start of this bushfire and heat wave season, more than 250 animals have been rescued and taken to the temporary, larger center.

But Mrs. Brister said there was no shortage of support for the cause, with a GoFundMe page that raised more than $ 80,000 and others offering practical help.

“We let people fly over from the interstate to help, we now have people from abroad,” she said.

Koalas injured on Kangaroo Island should not be treated in the hospital due to the fear that they may be infected by chlamydia

Koalas injured on Kangaroo Island should not be treated in the hospital due to the fear that they may be infected by chlamydia

Koalas injured on Kangaroo Island should not be treated in the hospital due to the fear that they may be infected by chlamydia

‘We also have people who volunteer to deliver trees (leaves) for the koalas, we have people who volunteer to wash all the towels that we go through for the bedding.

“The support from the community has been great.”

Others also do their best to help save the koala population.

Two heroic cousins ​​took on the task of rescuing as many injured koalas as possible after forest fires destroyed the marsupial home on Kangaroo Island.

The teenagers filmed their journey while loading different koalas into their cars and left looking for help in a clip shared with Reddit on Sunday.

“This is our little koala rescue,” one man heard in the clip.

He concentrated on a mother koala who cuddled with her joey.

Sam Mitchell, co-owner of the Kangaroo Island Wildlife Park, told Guardian Australia that they had brought 50 injured koalas to Kangaroo Island. Pictured: Koalas stored in Adelaide

Sam Mitchell, co-owner of the Kangaroo Island Wildlife Park, told Guardian Australia that they had brought 50 injured koalas to Kangaroo Island. Pictured: Koalas stored in Adelaide

Sam Mitchell, co-owner of the Kangaroo Island Wildlife Park, told Guardian Australia that they had brought 50 injured koalas to Kangaroo Island. Pictured: Koalas stored in Adelaide

“We’re just trying to collect as much live as we can,” he said.

Koalas were introduced to the island in the 1920s and were free of chlamydia, unlike the mainland population.

This means that koalas from Kangaroo Island cannot be brought to most of the state due to a quarantine order.

It is believed that thousands of koalas only died in Kangaroo Island.

Sam Mitchell, co-owner of the Kangaroo Island Wildlife Park, told Guardian Australia they have brought 50 injured koalas.

“Unfortunately, at least a third of what has been brought in, we have had euthanasia,” he said.

Despite the catastrophic figures, a koalade expert has said that the species is not about to die out

Despite the catastrophic figures, a koalade expert has said that the species is not about to die out

Despite the catastrophic figures, a koalade expert has said that the species is not about to die out

It is currently assumed that there are between 43,000 and 100,000 koalas in the wild

It is currently assumed that there are between 43,000 and 100,000 koalas in the wild

It is currently assumed that there are between 43,000 and 100,000 koalas in the wild

‘We see a lot of burns on hands and feet – fingernails melted away. For some, the burns are just too extreme. ”

Some islanders considered the marsupial infestation when their population grew to 50,000.

Despite the catastrophic figures, a koalade expert has said that the species is not about to die out.

Dr. Alistair Melzer, from Central Queensland University, told news.com.au that the koala survival was dependent on the extent of the forest fires in that specific community.

The expert said that koalas were not functionally extinct, meaning that a koala does not produce for two generations, despite what the Australian Koala Foundation said

The expert said that koalas were not functionally extinct, meaning that a koala does not produce for two generations, despite what the Australian Koala Foundation said

The expert said that koalas were not functionally extinct, meaning that a koala does not produce for two generations, despite what the Australian Koala Foundation said

‘Where catastrophic crown fires have taken place, the local population has been lost. Koalas instinctively climb to the top of trees, so they will have been lost in places where such fires have occurred. Not just koalas, but many other animals, “he said.

The expert said that koalas would not be functionally extinct, meaning that a koala does not produce for two generations, despite what the Australian Koala Foundation said.

The AKF believes that just under 50,000 koalas are “functionally extinct.”

It is currently assumed that there are between 43,000 and 100,000 koalas in the wild.

Dr. Melzer said that some koala habitats in Queensland and New South Wales were already recovering.

It is believed that more than a billion animals died in fires throughout the country

It is believed that more than a billion animals died in fires throughout the country

It is believed that more than a billion animals died in fires throughout the country

A male koala is weighed by veterinarians and nurses at the Adelaide Koala Rescue emergency on Wednesday

A male koala is weighed by veterinarians and nurses at the Adelaide Koala Rescue emergency on Wednesday

A male koala is weighed by veterinarians and nurses at the Adelaide Koala Rescue emergency on Wednesday

He said it depends on food sources.

‘Koalas depend on eucalyptus for both food and water. With the prolonged drought and heat and now, these forest fires will diminish the quality of that foliage, which may limit the availability of water and the nutritional value of the foliage, “Dr. said. Melzer.

It is believed that more than a billion animals died in fires throughout the country.

A veterinarian checks an injured male koala at Adelaide Koala Rescue at Paradise Primary school

A veterinarian checks an injured male koala at Adelaide Koala Rescue at Paradise Primary school

A veterinarian checks an injured male koala at Adelaide Koala Rescue at Paradise Primary school

Original reports suggested that 500 million animals had already died in the fire, and WWF Australia now estimates that the number is higher than a billion.

“Australia is a land of forest fires, but the unprecedented mega fires of this season are not normal. Climate change does not cause forest fires, but it does make them much worse, “said WWF-Australia CEO Dermot O’Gorman in a statement.

“This heartbreaking loss includes thousands of precious koalas on the mid-north coast of NSW, along with other iconic species such as kangaroos, wallabies, gliders, potoroos, cockatoos, and honey eaters.”

The loss of wildlife goes hand in hand with the damage of national forests and millions of trees, releasing huge amounts of carbon dioxide that are already affecting air quality.

An injured koala rests in a laundry basket in the Kangaroo Island Wildlife Park

An injured koala rests in a laundry basket in the Kangaroo Island Wildlife Park

An injured koala rests in a laundry basket in the Kangaroo Island Wildlife Park

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