The Russian travel company announces trips to Salisbury after the poisoning of novichok

A Russian travel company wasted no time in advertising its tours to Salisbury. In the photo: the tweet of the company

A Russian travel company announces trips to Salisbury only hours after two assassins who went there to kill a double agent claimed that they were only visiting as tourists.

Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov flew from Moscow to Heathrow and took the train to Salisbury, where they put the novichok nerve agent on the door handle of Sergei Skripal before flying home, says the British government.

The couple appeared today on the Russia Today television channel to claim that they are not Putin's killers and were just visiting Salisbury to see the city's Cathedral and nearby Stonehenge.

A Russian travel company wasted no time in advertising its tours to Salisbury.

A Russian travel company wasted no time in advertising its tours to Salisbury. In the photo: the tweet of the company

A Russian travel company wasted no time in advertising its tours to Salisbury. In the photo: the tweet of the company

The anonymous company tweeted: "Salisbury Cathedral is beautiful at this time of year! Is not it worth the price to come to Salisbury from Moscow? Buy tickets to London right now, it's just an hour's train ride.

The anonymous company tweeted: "Salisbury Cathedral is beautiful at this time of year! Is not it worth the price to come to Salisbury from Moscow? Buy tickets to London right now, it's just an hour's train ride.

The anonymous company tweeted: "Salisbury Cathedral is beautiful at this time of year! Is not it worth the price to come to Salisbury from Moscow? Buy tickets to London right now, it's just an hour's train ride.

The anonymous company tweeted: "Salisbury Cathedral is beautiful at this time of year! Is not it worth the price to come to Salisbury from Moscow? Buy tickets to London right now, it's just an hour's train ride.

The assertion of two suspects in the Skripal case that they visited Salisbury to see their cathedral "does not seem to add up," said the bishop of the city of Wiltshire.

The bishop of Salisbury, Nicholas Holtam, said he had no knowledge of any evidence linking Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov to the cathedral, and suggested that Russian men could have benefited from a visit to the building and a display of his copy of the Magna Carta

Responding to the men's claims, the bishop told BBC Radio 4's Today program: "It really does not add up, right?"

When asked if there were CCTV images in the cathedral, he said: "There is nothing that links the cathedral that we have, or I think someone has it, there is no way to prove that."

The bishop said that his response to the men's television interview was to think "What a pity they did not spend more time in that city, where they could have explored the cathedral and seen a building committed to the love of God, where there is a regular worship to raise our hearts, the highest needle and a copy of the Magna Carta on the rule of law and justice. They did not seem to see any of that, right?

It occurs after the Russian media questioned whether the assassins traveled together because they were homosexuals.

An online news website, Mash News, even began a poll asking readers if the two were "agents made to be gay or gay made to be agents."

Speculation began when the suspects were asked by RT today: "Speaking of normal men, in the video (CCTV) they are always shown together, they were together, they lived together, they walked everywhere together, what actually connects you?

Boshirov replied: "Do not leverage in our private lives."

Alexander Petrov, on the CCTV recording, and Ruslan Boshirov, on the left, were named by the British authorities as suspects, but insisted that they are victims of a stain and that they were simply on vacation.

Alexander Petrov, on the CCTV recording, and Ruslan Boshirov, on the left, were named by the British authorities as suspects, but insisted that they are victims of a stain and that they were simply on vacation.

Alexander Petrov, on the CCTV recording, and Ruslan Boshirov, on the left, were named by the British authorities as suspects, but insisted that they are victims of a stain and that they were simply on vacation.

When online speculation about her sexuality began, interviewer Margarita Simonyan, 38, who heads the Kremlin's propaganda channel, replied: "I do not know if they are homosexual or not."

"They are very fashionable, with small beards, haircuts, tight pants, tight sweaters on big biceps." They did not harass me.

"Anyway, I'm already out of the harassing age." Still, I served them cognac for courage.

"During the interview I told them that the world was less concerned with the question whether they slept in a bed or not."

The couple suggested that they were ordinary tourists who wanted to see, among other places of interest, Salisbury Cathedral.

The debate over their sexuality diverted attention from whether this couple was using alias names when they visited Salisbury, as Britain has argued.

Theresa May criticized Russia's novichok killers today after they claimed to be tourists and called their story "lies and blatant fabrication."

The two suspects of Skripal Ruslan Boshirov (left) and Alexander Petrov (right) have spoken for the first time and say that they were just tourists enjoying the delights of Salibury

The two suspects of Skripal Ruslan Boshirov (left) and Alexander Petrov (right) have spoken for the first time and say that they were just tourists enjoying the delights of Salibury

The two suspects of Skripal Ruslan Boshirov (left) and Alexander Petrov (right) have spoken for the first time and say that they were just tourists enjoying the delights of Salibury

Alexander Petrov (left) and Ruslan Boshirov (right) have been accused by the British police of being two Russian spies (in the photos of their passports)

The prime minister said the suspects, who used aliases Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov to enter Britain, had insulted the public intelligence & # 39; and they had been deeply offensive to the victims & # 39;

Today, the alleged GRU agents, who are believed to be from Siberia, told the state RT television station that they were trapped in Salisbury twice in two days after they could not get to Stonehenge because of the snow.

In the "absurd" interview, the men even admitted that they may have ended up in the suburban home of Sergei Skripal "by accident" while searching for the cathedral, which has a 400-foot needle and 25 minutes in the other direction.

The couple also refused to say why they booked at a hotel in East London if they wanted to be in Stonehenge and did not explain why they seemed to have no luggage when they were traveling home.

Body language expert Judy James told MailOnline that men appeared at times to recite a "script", while others said that her description of Salisbury and its monuments bore a striking resemblance to the Wikipedia page of the city.

The RT presenter funded by the Kremlin even suggested that the suspects were not trained killers, insinuating that they were gay lovers on a romantic getaway because they had "small beards, short haircuts and tight pants."

The prime minister's spokesman said today: "The flagrant lies and lies in this interview, given to a television channel sponsored by the Russian state, are an insult to public intelligence and, more importantly, deeply offensive to the public. victims and loved ones of this horrible attack.

During their dazzling television appearance (in the photo) the men claimed that they now fear for their lives and demanded an apology from Britain and RT said they were so nervous that they needed Cognac before going on the air

During their dazzling television appearance (in the photo) the men claimed that they now fear for their lives and demanded an apology from Britain and RT said they were so nervous that they needed Cognac before going on the air

During their dazzling television appearance (in the photo) the men claimed that they now fear for their lives and demanded an apology from Britain and RT said they were so nervous that they needed Cognac before going on the air

The couple says they were alone in Salisbury for an hour due to gaps in Sunday train service to London and said that if they tripped over the suburban home of Sergei Skripal it was only by accident.

The couple says they were alone in Salisbury for an hour due to gaps in Sunday train service to London and said that if they tripped over the suburban home of Sergei Skripal it was only by accident.

The couple says they were alone in Salisbury for an hour due to gaps in Sunday train service to London and said that if they tripped over the suburban home of Sergei Skripal it was only by accident.

Former Russian double agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia (pictured together in Salisbury) were poisoned with Novichok after he was stained at the door of his house

Former Russian double agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia (pictured together in Salisbury) were poisoned with Novichok after he was stained at the door of his house

Former Russian double agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia (pictured together in Salisbury) were poisoned with Novichok after he was stained at the door of his house

One of the spies admitted to being lost and accidentally ended up near Skripal's house and said that his trip to Salisbury as tourists was hampered by snow, so they left early on March 4, the day the skripals became ill .

Theresa May (pictured yesterday) criticized the story of the suspects and called it an insult to Britain and especially to the people of Salisbury

Theresa May (pictured yesterday) criticized the story of the suspects and called it an insult to Britain and especially to the people of Salisbury

Theresa May (pictured yesterday) criticized the story of the suspects and called it an insult to Britain and especially to the people of Salisbury

"Sadly this is what we have come to expect: an illegal chemical weapon has been used in the streets of this country, we have seen four people seriously ill in the hospital and an innocent woman has died.

"Russia has responded with contempt, the police have very clearly exposed the evidence against these two men, they are wanted men and we have taken all measures to ensure that they are arrested and brought to justice in the United Kingdom if they ever come out again. Russia ".

Scotland Yard says he was aware of the statements made by "two men" and reiterated that "Alexander Petrov" and "Ruslan Boshirov" are "wanted".

After the extraordinary interview today, it also emerged:

  • Experts say there are huge holes in their history and the body language expert tells MailOnline that the men appeared reciting & # 39; monologues of guide books & # 39; about Salisbury;
  • The PM spokesman says the interview is "obfuscation and lies" to claim that the suspected Russian spies went to Salisbury twice in two days as tourists;
  • Scotland Yard says the suspects are still wanted and insist that the two men use aliases;
  • Two novichok suspects say they fear the British secret services plan to kill them;
  • They also accused the UK police of hiding CCTV in Salisbury Cathedral and other tourist spots to immobilize them;
  • The Russian press suggests that the men, who had "fashionable beards" and tight pants, may have been homosexual men during a long weekend in Britain instead of a murder mission;

Affirmations & # 39; absurdities & # 39; of the Novichok Assassins: Observers point out several holes in the history of "innocent tourists" & # 39;

The "accidental" visit to Skripal's house

CCTV released by police placed the two suspects in the suburban home of Sergei Skripal.

Today the men admitted that they may have ended up there, but they said it was an accident.

The property, which had novichok smeared on the door, is 25 minutes from the city center and its cathedral, which the men said they were there to see.

Ruslan Boshirov said: Maybe we approved it, or maybe we did not. I had never heard about them before this nightmare began. I had never heard this name before. I did not know anything about them.

Bad weather

Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov claimed that they only stayed in Salisbury due to heavy snowfall.

The couple visited them days after the Eastern Beast struck Britain with unusually cold weather.

Describing the condition, Boshirov said: "It was impossible to get anywhere because of the snow." We were soaked to our knees.

But the CCTV images of the men show that the sidewalks were practically free of snow.

They also told RT that it snowed in the city that afternoon, but the weather maps for that day show sun and clear skies.

The hotel

Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov were guests at the City Stay Hotel in Bow, east of London, before poisoning Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia.

The Metropolitan Police confirmed today that the "low" levels of the nerve agent were found at the two-star hotel £ 48 per night in May.

The men chose a location some distance from Waterloo, the main railway route to Salisbury, despite making the city of Wiltshire the center of their visit.

The luggage

The men went straight from Salisbury to Heathrow for the night flight.

But CCTV suggested that they did not have any luggage with them on their way home.

Petrov and Boshirov said they fear that the British secret services will have a reward in our heads & # 39; and demanded an apology from Theresa May's government.

The men told the state-funded RT television station that the claims that the murderers are complete *** bulls.

They claim that they were only in Salisbury for an hour due to gaps in Sunday train service to London and said that if they came across the suburban house of Sergei Skripal it was only by accident.

Scotland Yard and MI5 say they are spies from GRU sent to assassinate Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia after bringing enough novichok to annihilate 4,000 civilians in Britain on a plane from Russia.

But during their dazzling appearance on television, the men said they now fear for their lives and demanded an apology from Britain. RT said they were so nervous that they needed Cognac before they went on the air.

Boshirov also denied that the Kremlin had forced them to speak and said: "When your life turns around, you do not know what to do or where to go, we are afraid to go out, we fear for ourselves, our lives and those of our loved ones. "

While Petrov, who said he had never heard the name of Skripal until Britain pointed a finger at him, replied: "You can not imagine what it is like, we would like it if someday the real perpetrators are found and they give us an apology" .

But within minutes of his television appearance on stage, it was called "propaganda administered by the Kremlin" and the prime minister's spokesman called his account "obfuscation and lies."

Salisbury MP John Glen tweeted: "I am delighted that Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Borishov have been able to see the world-class attractions that Salisbury has to offer, but it is very strange to come here for just two days while carrying Novichok in your luggage & # 39;

Critics also noted that the men said they failed to withstand the "sleet". despite living in Siberia, where there is often snow on the ground during the middle of the year.

His unsuccessful assassination attempt in March failed, but tragically claimed the life of Dawn Sturgess, who found the gun three months later and sprayed it on her wrist believing it was the Nina Ricci Premier Jour perfume.

But men today described themselves as "decent boys" working in the sports nutrition business.

They said they went to Salisbury twice in two days in an attempt to get to Stonehenge, but were frustrated each time by the snow.

Boshirov and Petrov said they "got wet" and froze, and that on both visits they stayed for a short period of time, walking a short distance and having a coffee, before returning to London on the train.

But Boshirov also admitted that they may have run into the ex-spy's suburban home, a half-hour walk from the station and out of the city center, but only by accident.

He said: & # 39; Maybe we did it [approach] Skripal's house, but we do not know where it was located & # 39;

Police say he left Saturday March 3 as a dry run before carrying out the assassination attempt on Sunday, March 4 and travel back to Heathrow and a flight to Moscow that night.

Responding to Petrov and Boshirov's interview, a government spokesman said: "The Police and the Public Prosecutor's Office have identified these men as the main suspects in connection with the attack in Salisbury.

"The government is clear that these men are officers of the Russian military intelligence service, the GRU, who used a devastatingly toxic illegal chemical weapon on the streets of our country.

"We have repeatedly asked Russia to explain what happened in Salisbury in March, today, as we have seen it everywhere, they have responded with obfuscation and lies."

The suspects insisted today that they wanted to go to Salisbury & # 39; after a recommendation from a friend & # 39; not to spot a nervous agent at the main gate of Sergei Skripal.

The deputy from Salisbury mocked the interview and demanded to know why they were wearing novichok.

Vladimir Putin, photographed at an economic forum in Russia yesterday, says his country's authorities have found the men suspected of the Novichok attack and say his trip to Britain was not criminal

Vladimir Putin, photographed at an economic forum in Russia yesterday, says his country's authorities have found the men suspected of the Novichok attack and say his trip to Britain was not criminal

Vladimir Putin, photographed at an economic forum in Russia yesterday, says his country's authorities have found the men suspected of the Novichok attack and say his trip to Britain was not criminal

The & # 39; killers & # 39; of Novichok can be LOVERS who were on a romantic trip to Britain when the Skripals were poisoned in Salisbury, according to Russian media

Russian media today suggested that Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov were on a gay trip to Britain to help support their strange story.

An online news portal even began a survey by asking readers if the two were "agents made to be gay or gay made to be agents."

The speculation began when RT asked them: "Speaking of normal men, in the video (CCTV) they are always shown together, they were together, they lived together, they walked everywhere together, what actually connects you?

Boshirov replied: "Do not leverage in our private lives."

When online speculation about her sexuality began, interviewer Margarita Simonyan, 38, who heads the Kremlin's propaganda channel, replied: "I do not know if they are homosexual or not."

"They are very fashionable, with small beards, haircuts, tight pants, tight sweaters on big biceps." They did not harass me. Anyway, I'm already out of the harassing age.

She added: "During the interview I told them that the world less concerned with the question whether they slept in a bed or not"

Today critics said the men were lying in an interview with a television station often called Putin's propaganda machine.

John Glen, Salisbury MP, said today: "Salisbury welcomes tourists from all over the world and is very open for business, but the Petrov / Borishov statements are not credible and do not match the widely accepted intelligence we have about These individuals & # 39;

Boshirov denied having heard the name of Skripal, saying: "I did not know, I had not heard, until this situation, until this nightmare began with us, has not heard this surname. [Skripal], I did not know anything about them. We are asking for your protection. "

The editor of RT, Margarita Simonyan, who interviewed them last night, asked the two men if they had Novichok or some poison, he emphatically said no.

Boshirov said: "Is it silly for decent boys to have women's perfume?" Customs is checking everything, "they would have questions about why men have women's perfume in their luggage, we do not have it."

Britain insists that the men were sent by the state of Russia, which gave them aliases & # 39; perfect & # 39; and identification documents used to guarantee the United Kingdom visa.

Traces of novichok were also found in their economic hotel room in East London, where they stayed during their brief trip to the United Kingdom in March.

But the men say they are victims of a smear campaign and that they were vacationers.

Petrov, who only one week ago said he knew nothing about Salisbury and had been in Siberia, told RT: "We arrived in Salisbury on March 3 and we were trying to walk through the city, but we only lasted half an hour because it was covered. the snow & # 39;

"Of course, we went there to see Stonehenge but we could not do it because there was muddy snow everywhere." We got wet, took the nearest train and returned [to London]& # 39;

Boshirov added: "We did not spend more than an hour in Salisbury, mainly due to delays between trains."

The next day, he returned to Salisbury again, saying it was sunny in London, but he claimed that they arrived in Salisbury and it began to snow again.

They said they went for a walk to the cathedral, but that they left early & # 39; because they were cold and wet before returning to Russia that night.

The killers claim they are "decent boys" who were on a day trip to admire Salisbury and not kill the former Skripal spy

Ruslan Boshirov, left, and Alexander Petrov, right, claim they are victims of defamation and suggested that Britain was conspiring to kill them.

Ruslan Boshirov, left, and Alexander Petrov, right, claim they are victims of defamation and suggested that Britain was conspiring to kill them.

Ruslan Boshirov, left, and Alexander Petrov, right, claim they are victims of defamation and suggested that Britain was conspiring to kill them.

The most wanted men in Europe spoke for the first time today and insisted that they are victims of a smear campaign.

Here is a transcript

The editor-in-chief of RT Margarita Simonyan: He called my cell phone, saying that you were Ruslan Boshirov and Alexander Petrov. You are Alexander Petrov, and you are Ruslan Boshirov. You look like the people we saw in those photos and videos from the United Kingdom. So, who are you really?

Alexander Petrov: We are the people you saw.

Ruslan Boshirov: I'm Ruslan Boshirov.

AP: And I am Alexander Petrov.

MS: Are these your real names?

RB: Yes, these are our real names.

MS: But even now, frankly, you look very tense.

AP: How would you look if you were in our shoes?

RB: When your whole life turns upside down suddenly, overnight, and it falls apart.

MS: The guys we all saw in those London and Salisbury videos, wearing those jackets and sneakers, are you?

AP: Yes, it's us.

MS: What were you doing there?

AP: Our friends have been suggesting for a long time that we visited this wonderful city.

MS: Salisbury? A wonderful city?

AP: Yes.

MS: What makes it so wonderful?

RB: It's a tourist city. They have a famous cathedral there, Salisbury Cathedral. It is famous all over Europe and, in fact, all over the world, I think. It is famous for its 123 meter needle. It is famous for its watch. It is the oldest working clock in the world.

MS: So, did you travel to Salisbury to see the clock?

AP: No, we initially planned to go to London and have fun there. This time, it was not a business trip. Our plan was to spend time in London and then visit Salisbury. Of course, we wanted to do everything in one day. But when we got there, even our plane could not land on the first approach. This is due to all the havoc they had with transport in the United Kingdom on March 2 and 3. Due to the heavy snow, almost all the cities were paralyzed. We could not go anywhere.

RB: It was in all the news. The railroads did not work on March 2 and 3. The roads were closed. Police cars and ambulances blocked the roads. There was no traffic at all, there were no trains, nothing. Why does not anyone talk about this?

MS: Can you give the timeline? Minute by minute, or at least hour by hour, or as much as you can remember. You came to the United Kingdom, as you said, to have some fun and see the cathedral, see a clock in Salisbury. Can you tell us what you did in the United Kingdom? You spent two days there, right?

AP: Actually, three.

MS: OK, three. What did you do those three days?

AP: We arrived on March 2. We went to the train station to check the schedule, to see where we could go.

RB: The initial plan was to go there and return that day. Just take a look and come back the same day.

AP: For Salisbury, that's it. A day in Salisbury is enough. There is not much you can do there.

RB: It's a normal city. A regular tourist city.

MS: OK, I understand that. That was your plan. But what did you really do? You arrived. There were heavy snowfalls. No trains, nothing. What did you do then?

AP: No, we arrived in Salisbury on March 3. We wanted to walk through the city, but as the whole city was covered in snow, we spent only 30 minutes there. We were all wet.

RB: There are no images. The media, television, nobody talks about the fact that the transportation system was paralyzed that day. It was impossible to get anywhere because of the snow. We were soaked to the knees.

MS: Good. You went for a walk for 30 minutes, you got wet. Whats Next?

AP: We travel there to see Stonehenge, Old Sarum and the Cathedral of the Blessed Virgin Mary. But it did not work because of the melted snow. The whole city was covered in sleet. We got wet, so we went back to the train station and took the first train to return. We spent about 40 minutes in a cafeteria at the train station.

RB: drinking coffee. Drinking hot coffee because we were soaked.

AP: Maybe a little over an hour. That's because of the large intervals between trains. I think this was because of the snowfall. We returned to London and continued our trip.

RB: We walk through London …

MS: So, you only spent an hour in Salisbury?

AP: on March 3? Yes. That's because it was impossible to get anywhere.

MS: How was the next day?

AP: On March 4, we went back there, because the snow melted in London, it was hot.

RB: it was sunny.

AP: And we thought, we really wanted to see Old Sarum and the cathedral. So we decided to give it another try on March 4th.

MS: Another attempt to do what?

AP: go sightseeing.

RB: To see this famous cathedral. To visit Old Sarum.

MS: So, did you see it?

RT editor Margarita Simonyan tweeted today that she spent the night with the suspects and suggested that they deny any part of the plot

RT editor Margarita Simonyan tweeted today that she spent the night with the suspects and suggested that they deny any part of the plot

RT editor Margarita Simonyan tweeted today that she spent the night with the suspects and suggested that they deny any part of the plot

RB: Yes, we did.

AP: On March 4, we did it. But again, at lunchtime, there was heavy rain with snow.

RB: For some reason, nobody talks about this fact.

AP: So we left early.

MS: Is it beautiful?

RB: The cathedral is very beautiful. They have many tourists, many Russian tourists, many Russian-speaking tourists.

AP: By the way, they should have many pictures of the cathedral.

MS: Your photos, you mean?

AP: You should show them.

MS: I guess you took some pictures while you were at the cathedral?

RB: of course.

AP: Sure, we did it.

RB: We went to a park, we had a coffee. We went to a coffee shop and we had coffee. We walked, enjoying those beautiful English gothic buildings.

AP: For some reason, they do not show this. They only show how we went to the train station.

MS: If you give us your photos, we can show them. So, while you were in Salisbury, did you go somewhere near the house of the Skripals?

AP: Maybe. We do not know

RB: And you? Do you know where your house is?

MS: Not me. You do?

RB: Neither do we.

AP: I wish someone would tell us where it is.

RB: Maybe we approved it, or maybe we did not. I had never heard about them before this nightmare began. I had never heard this name before. I did not know anything about them.

MS: When you arrived in the United Kingdom, when you were in London or Salisbury, during your entire trip, did you have any Novichok or other poisonous agent or dangerous substance?

RB: No.

AP: It's absurd.

MS: Did you have the Nina Ricci perfume bottle that the UK presents as evidence of your alleged crime?

RB: Do not you think it's stupid for two heterosexual men to wear perfumes for women? When you pass through customs, they check all your belongings. Then, if we had something suspicious, they would definitely have questions. Why would a man have perfume for women in his luggage?

AP: Even an ordinary person would have questions. Why would a man need perfume for women?

MS: Where would an ordinary person see that you have a bottle of perfume?

RB: I mean, when you go through customs …

MS: To summarize, did you have that bottle of Nina Ricci or not?

RB: No.

AP: No, of course not.

MS: Speaking of heterosexual men, all the footage presents you two together. They spent time together, they lived together, they went for a walk together. What do they have in common that they spend so much time together?

RB: You know, let's not break anyone's privacy. We seek protection, but this is becoming a kind of interrogation. We are going too far. We seek protection for you. You are not questioning us.

MS: We are journalists, we do not protect. We are not lawyers. Actually, this was my next question. Why did you decide to go to the media? Your photos were published a while ago with your names, but you keep silent. You called me today because you wanted to talk to the media. Why?

RB: To ask for protection.

AP: You say that we kept silent. After our lives became a nightmare, we did not know what to do, where to go. Police? Research Committee? Embassy of the United Kingdom?

RB: O FSB. We did not know

MS: Why go to the Embassy of the United Kingdom?

AP: We really did not know what to do. Where to go? Hello?

RB: You know, when your life turns around, you really do not understand what to do and where to go. And many say, why do not you go to the Embassy of the United Kingdom and explain everything?

MS: And you know what they say about you, right?

AP: Of course I do.

RB: Yes, of course. We can not go out on the street because we are afraid. They were afraid.

MS: What are you afraid of?

RB: We fear for our lives. And for the lives of our families and friends.

MS: So, are you afraid that the UK secret service will kill you or what?

RB: We just do not know.

AP: Just read what they write there. They even offer a reward.

MS: What do you mean? Is there a reward in your head?

RB: Dmitry Gudkov, if I'm not mistaken, promised a trip to the UK to anyone who takes us with him. Do you think it's OK? And do you think we can feel good, walk and smile, talk to people? Any sensible person would be afraid.

Detectives believe that the two suspects, who are believed to be around 40 years old, traveled under alias and that Petrov and Boshirov are not their real names.

Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia were found slumped on a bench in downtown Salisbury on March 4 while the men were flying back to Russia.

Officials formally linked the attack to the Skripals with events in nearby Amesbury, where Dawn Sturgess, 44, and her partner Charlie Rowley, 45, were exposed to the same nerve agent.

Ms. Sturgess died in the hospital in July, just a week after the couple became ill.

A police officer who visited the Skripals' home shortly after the attack, Nick Bailey, was also seriously ill from exposure to the substance.

Yesterday, the Russian president affirmed that they were civilians and not military spies of GRU. Despite the evidence from Great Britain, the men were sent by the Russian state to kill the former spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia.

Speaking at an economic forum in Vladivostok, Putin said: "We have checked what kind of people they are, we know who they are, we have found them, there is nothing criminal in that.

The bottle of Fake Nina Ricci perfume used by the killers of Salisbury was manufactured by the best scientists of the branch & # 39; Q-ski & # 39; of Russian military intelligence

Police have posted images of the perfume bottle that they say was adapted to help the two Russian suspects carry out their lethal attack

The Russians spent a fortune on the small bottle of perfume inspired by James Bond used to carry novichok, including the development of new technology to ensure that it was not a suicide mission for their agents, as revealed by experts today.

Bretton-Gordon's Hamish, one of Britain's top chemical weapons experts, says the fake Nina Ricci Premier Jour flask could only have been produced by Putin's best scientists in his most sophisticated and secret laboratory.

He told MailOnline: "They needed to make sure that the men who carried out the attack did not kill themselves while they were doing it. It would be deeply embarrassing for his agents to die in a foreign land. "

Los dos asesinos, usando los alias Ruslan Boshirov y Alexander Petrov, llevaron sin problemas la botella de Novichok al Reino Unido antes de rociarla en la puerta principal de Sergei Skripal en los suburbios de Salisbury en marzo.

Los expertos creen que el golpe fallido se produjo después de tres meses de desarrollo y pruebas probablemente sancionadas en los niveles más altos del estado ruso.

El laboratorio, llamado "Q-ski" después de la división de investigación y desarrollo del Servicio Secreto Británico en James Bond, fabricó la botella y la boquilla aplicadora de "un solo sentido", por lo que era imposible que Novichok se filtrara en tránsito.

También estaba hecho de vidrio endurecido especial, plástico o cerámica que seguramente no se rompería, quebró ni se degradaría mientras transportaba una de las armas más mortíferas del mundo.

Los hombres en el centro del escándalo finalmente admitieron que estaban en Salisbury, días después de negarlo.

'Ningún comentario por el momento. Tal vez más tarde ", se informó que Alexander Petrov le dijo al canal de televisión estatal Rossiya-24.

La semana pasada, el mismo hombre le dijo a la televisión rusa: 'No sé nada al respecto. Y no tengo nada que ver con la historia de Skripal.

Afirmó que había sido víctima de una identidad equivocada, y negó tener un pasaporte extranjero, y agregó: "Esta es una coincidencia completa", dijo. "No digamos Londres, ni siquiera puedo llegar a las montañas de Altai (en el sur de Siberia)".

El otro sospechoso, Ruslan Boshirov, también nombrado por la policía antiterrorista en Londres, no había hablado hasta hoy.

Viktoria Skripal, sobrina del ex agente doble envenenado Sergei Skripal, dijo ayer: "Según mis datos, el verdadero Alexander Petrov no estaba en el Reino Unido en ese momento. Estas son personas comunes El trabajo de Petrov ni siquiera está relacionado con el gobierno ".

Ella dijo que Petrov y Boshirov están completamente desconcertados y conmocionados por lo que está sucediendo.

'I knew it from the first day that this whole story about involvement of Petrov and Boshirov is fake.'

This claim appeared to contradict Putin who said the Russian government had 'found' the pair identified by Britain.

MailOnline revealed that the suspects casually window-shopped in Salisbury just minutes after they tried to murder former double agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter.

The exclusive first footage seen of the killers shows the two men looking relaxed and good-humoured as they sauntered down the street towards Salisbury station to make their getaway.

The suspects were handed genuine Russian passports and then secured visas from the British embassy in Moscow under bogus aliases Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov to avoid detection during their murder mission in March.

Their passports were repeatedly used on trips from Moscow to Amsterdam, Geneva, Milan and Paris between September 2016 and March 2018 with British investigators now scrambling to work out exactly what the Russian spies were doing in Europe.

Petrov's passport was also used in London on February 28 2017 – a year before their botched mission to kill former double agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia with a nerve agent smeared on his front door in suburban Salisbury.

The travel details have been published by Fontanka, an independent Russian media outlet with a strong track record of investigative reporting into Putin's regime.

Hamish de Bretton Gordon, one of Britain's top chemical weapons experts, told MailOnline that UK security sources have briefed him that the men, who were GRU military agents, had watertight backstories that helped them avoid being stopped at the UK border.

He said: 'The passports were perfect in every detail including all the electrics and circuitry. It fooled the British border electronic security which is considered to be among the best around. We also gave them visas they must have had a plausible back story'.

Mr de Bretton Gordon suggested that Russia may even have hacked the UK's border security system to make doubly sure they were not flagged as 'people of interest' and interviewed. The Home Office today denied this.

Security Minister Ben Wallace said Vladimir Putin is 'ultimately responsible' for the novichok attack because of his tight grip on the GRU spy network which sent two 'calamitous' state assassins on a 'pathetic' mission to kill Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia.

He said: 'The state had clearly decided to sit behind this action and lend its logistics. The men were given genuine passports, provided with aliases that survived a certain level of test and visas used by many law-abiding Russians to visit Britain for holidays or business.

'The Russian state, which we know had invented novichok, must have made sure it was put in a package that was there to disguise it. If you let them into your system, airside in Russia, it becomes a harder thing to detect'.

Mr Wallace said he is '100 per cent sure' the men named carried out the attack and claimed that Vladimir Putin has ultimate responsibility for the actions of his spies – but added: 'This was more Johnny English than James Bond'.

He said: 'Ultimately he does, insofar as he is president of the Russian Federation and it is his government that controls, funds and directs the military intelligence – that's the GRU – via his minister of defence. I don't think that anyone can ever say that Mr Putin isn't in control of his state'.

'A poker face and an eye flick that suggests creative thinking': Body language expert analyses novichok hitmen's extraordinary interview

Boshirov appeared agitated and stressed while Petrov was more measured in his approach

Boshirov appeared agitated and stressed while Petrov was more measured in his approach

Boshirov appeared agitated and stressed while Petrov was more measured in his approach

The Russian assassins seemed to be regurgitating a script and trying to fix their "poker faces," a body language expert told MailOnline today.

Petrov fue el más controlado y tranquilo, mientras que Boshirov muestra síntomas de estrés o ansiedad, dijo Judy James.

The expert has watched the RT interview back and this is what she saw:

Petrov sits slightly slumped rather than in a more alert, pleading style as you might do if you were trying to convince people of your innocent role. His arms and hands are hidden below the table. Esto se puede usar como una versión corporal de una "cara de póker", cuando alguien desea esconder sus manos en caso de que le den las señales incorrectas, pero también puede ser un deseo de esconderse y sentirse protegido por la barrera de la mesa.

Its characteristic of turning the chair from one side to another is interesting, since it could indicate nervousness or it could suggest a much more impatient impatience and anger. His eyes remain nailed to the interviewer in most of the clip with what looks like a confident and penetrating look. When he closes his eyes and nods his head for an affirmative answer, his emphatic facial gestures suggest power instead of submission.

When we are in a state of stress or anxiety our blink rate often increases as the adrenalin of fear kicks in. Petrov's blink rate looks extremely slow here though. At one point he makes almost five turns of his chair between blinks and this might suggest again the inner strength or confidence.

When they tell him they are nervous, his upper lip seems to rise in a small grunt, as if the accusation bothers him or the fact that his nerves have been driven by events bothers him.

What were they doing in Salisbury? His eyes turn to the right, which may suggest creative thinking, although he might have looked in that direction because he knew his friend was about to start his travel journal on the beautiful views of Salisbury.

Boshirov is much more active during the video and also shows more symptoms of what might be nervousness. His first pose is generally superficially safer, leaning back in his chair with his elbows on his arms in a light play of control, but the movement of his upper chest suggests a quick and shallow breathing that can occur when someone feels under pressure. His blink rate is also much faster than his friend's and he takes several large swallows that can also be triggered by stress or anxiety.

He takes action when accused of appearing "nervous", leaning forward with both arms on the table, shrugging his shoulders before joining his fingers and forming a bell gesture with his thumbs, which is usually a sign of power or status . Apparently frustrated, he snorts and shrugs his shoulders before sitting down and leaving a hand on the table.

Your monologue of & # 39; guide & # 39; Salisbury comes after a deep breath and a forward look as if he is accessing an internal script in his head.

A spokesperson for the Prime Minister, pictured today, reiterated claims by British authorities that the men were Russian intelligence agents and accused the Kremlin of 'lies'

A spokesperson for the Prime Minister, pictured today, reiterated claims by British authorities that the men were Russian intelligence agents and accused the Kremlin of 'lies'

A spokesperson for the Prime Minister, pictured today, reiterated claims by British authorities that the men were Russian intelligence agents and accused the Kremlin of 'lies'

A critic of Putin's regime has claimed the suspects are 'already dead' and that a search for them is futile.

Andrei Piontkovsky believes that Petrov and Boshirov could have been executed to hide traces of the crime.

He compared the case to that of Andrey Lugovoy and Dmitry Kovtun, the men accused by Britain of poisoning Alexander Litvinenko with polonium in 2006.

Lugovoy and Kovtun went public to deny the claims soon after being accused, meaning the Russian authorities then protected them, said Piontkovsky.

'Lugovoy and Kovtun rescued themselves by running to Ecko (radio station) and going public,' the respected mathematician and political analyst said.

'One (Lugovoy) even had to be made an MP. If 'Petrov' and 'Bashirov' don't appear in the coming days, it means they are already dead.'

Prime Minister Theresa May told the House of Commons last week that CCTV evidence 'clearly' places the two Russians in the vicinity of the Skripals' house shortly before the attack on them.

The Met Police released photographs of the elaborate ruse used by the Russian agents including a perfect reconstruction of packaging to transport the weapon

The Met Police released photographs of the elaborate ruse used by the Russian agents including a perfect reconstruction of packaging to transport the weapon

The Met Police released photographs of the elaborate ruse used by the Russian agents including a perfect reconstruction of packaging to transport the weapon

A timeline of the key developments in the Salisbury poisoning case

2010 – Sergei Skripal, a former Russian military intelligence officer jailed for spying for Britain, is released and flown to the UK as part of a swap with Russian agents caught in the United States. He settles in Salisbury.

March 3, 2018 – Yulia Skripal arrives at Heathrow Airport from Russia to visit her father in England.

March 4, 9.15am – Sergei Skripal's burgundy BMW is seen in suburban Salisbury, near a cemetery, where his wife and son are commemorated.

March 4, 1.30pm – The BMW is seen driving toward central Salisbury.

March 4, 1.40pm – The BMW is parked at a lot in central Salisbury.

A police officer stands guard outside the Zizzi restaurant where Sergei and Yulia had lunch before they collapsed in a nearby park

A police officer stands guard outside the Zizzi restaurant where Sergei and Yulia had lunch before they collapsed in a nearby park

A police officer stands guard outside the Zizzi restaurant where Sergei and Yulia had lunch before they collapsed in a nearby park

March 4, afternoon – Sergei and Yulia Skripal visit the Bishops Mill pub.

March 4, 2.20pm to 3.35pm – Sergei and Yulia Skripal have lunch at the Zizzi restaurant.

March 4, 4.15pm – Emergency services are called by a passer-by concerned about a man and a woman in Salisbury city centre.

Officers find the Skripals unconscious on a bench. They are taken to Salisbury District Hospital, where they remain in critical condition.

March 5, morning – Police say two people in Salisbury are being treated for suspected exposure to an unknown substance.

Detective Sergeant Nick Bailey was among the first police officers on the scene and was himself hospitalised

Detective Sergeant Nick Bailey was among the first police officers on the scene and was himself hospitalised

Detective Sergeant Nick Bailey was among the first police officers on the scene and was himself hospitalised

March 5, afternoon – Wiltshire Police, along with Public Health England, declare a 'major incident'

March 7 – Police announce that the Skripals were likely poisoned with a nerve agent in a targeted murder attempt.

They disclose that a police officer who responded to the incident is in serious condition in a hospital.

March 8 – Home Secretary Amber Rudd describes the use of a nerve agent on UK soil was a 'brazen and reckless act' of attempted murder

March 9 – About 180 troops trained in chemical warfare and decontamination are deployed to Salisbury to help with the police investigation.

Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov says Moscow might be willing to assist with the investigation but expresses resentment at suggestions the Kremlin was behind the attack.

March 11 – Public health officials tell people who visited the Zizzi restaurant or Bishops Mill pub in Salisbury on the day of the attack or the next day to wash their clothes as a precaution.

March 12, morning– Prime Minister Theresa May tells the House of Commons that the Skripals were poisoned with Novichok, a military-grade nerve agent developed by the Soviet Union during the Cold War.

March 12, afternoon – Public Health England ask everyone who visited Salisbury town centre on the day of the attack to wash all of their clothes and belongings.

Officers wearing chemical protection suits secure the forensic tent over the bench where Sergei and Yulia fell ill

Officers wearing chemical protection suits secure the forensic tent over the bench where Sergei and Yulia fell ill

Officers wearing chemical protection suits secure the forensic tent over the bench where Sergei and Yulia fell ill

March 14 – The PM announces the expulsion of 23 suspected Russian spies from the country's UK Embassy.

March 22 – Nick Bailey, the police officer injured in the attack, is released from hospital.

March 26 – The United States and 22 other countries join Britain in expelling scores of Russian spies from capitals across the globe.

March 29 – Doctors say Yulia Skripal is 'improving rapidly' in hospital.

April 3 – The chief of the Porton Down defence laboratory said it could not verify the 'precise source' of the nerve agent.

April 5, morning – Yulia Skripal's cousin Viktoria says she has received a call from Yulia saying she plans to leave hospital soon.

Dawn Sturgess died in hospital on July 8

Dawn Sturgess died in hospital on July 8

Dawn Sturgess died in hospital on July 8

April 5, afternoon – A statement on behalf of Yulia is released by Metropolitan Police, in which she says her strength is 'growing daily' and that 'daddy is fine'.

April 9 – Ms Skripal is released from hospital and moved to a secure location.

May 18 – Sergei Skripal is released from hospital 11 weeks after he was poisoned.

June 30 – Dawn Sturgess and Charlie Rowley fall ill at a property in Amesbury, which is eight miles from Salisbury, and are rushed to hospital.

July 4 – Police declare a major incident after Ms Sturgess and Mr Rowley are exposed to an 'unknown substance', later revealed to be Novichok.

July 5 – Sajid Javid demands an explanation over the two poisonings as he accuses the Russian state of using Britain as a 'dumping ground for poison'.

July 8 – Mother-of-three Dawn Sturgess, 44, dies in hospital due to coming into contact with Novichok.

July 10 – Mr Rowley regains consciousness at hospital, and later tells his brother that Dawn had sprayed the Novichok onto her wrists.

July 19 – Police are believed to have identified the perpetrators of the attack.

August 20 –  Charlie Rowley is rushed to hospital as he starts to lose his site, but doctors can't confirm whether it has anything to do with the poisoning.

August 26 – Charlie Rowley admitted to intensive care unit with meningitis

August 28 – Police call in the 'super recognisers'  in bid to track down the poisoners

4th of September –  Charlie Rowley's brother says he has 'lost all hope' and doesn't have long to live.

Independent investigators, the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, confirm the toxic chemical that killed Ms Sturgess was the same nerve agent as that which poisoned the Skripals.

September 5 – Scotland Yard and CPS announce enough evidence to charge Russian nationals Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov for conspiracy to murder over Salisbury nerve agent attack.

September 13 – Britain's most wanted men speak to RT and claim to be humble tourists

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