The regional bloc insists on unity government after the vote in DR Congo

The regional bloc insists on unity government after the vote in DR Congo

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Supporters of Felix Tshisekedi, who was called the preliminary winner of the presidential elections in the Democratic Republic of Congo, will celebrate the headquarters in Kinshasa outside of the Union for Democracy and Social Progress (UDPS) on 10 January 2019.

Supporters of Felix Tshisekedi, who was called the preliminary winner of the presidential elections in the Democratic Republic of Congo, will celebrate the headquarters in Kinshasa outside of the Union for Democracy and Social Progress (UDPS) on 10 January 2019.

A regional bloc on Sunday called on the Democratic Republic of Congo to form a unity government in the aftermath of the controversial elections, while also calling for a recount of the ballots.

The CENI election committee late last Wednesday announced with great amazement that opposition leader Felix Tshisekedi had laughed at Martin Fayulu, who had been seen as the obvious precursor in the vote.

Tshisekedi was named the victor with 38.57 per cent, while Fayulu second with 34.8 per cent.

Many observers feared that the chosen successor of the outgoing president Joseph Kabila, Emmanuel Shadary, could win thanks to voice manipulation.

Fayulu cried immediately and ordered the result to the Constitutional Court, which has a week to decide on the question.

On Sunday, the Development Community of Southern Africa (SADC) urged all political leaders to consider a negotiated political settlement for an all-inclusive government in the vast Central African country.

Zambian President Edgar Chagwa Lungu, whose country currently holds the rotating presidency of the 16-headed SADC, said that such a move would "increase public confidence, build bridges and strengthen the government's democratic institutions and the election process for better The Congo would strengthen ".

Lungu has spoken with Tshisekedi and "other stakeholders inside and outside the DRC", the SADC said in a statement.

Taking "strong doubts" about the results expressed by the powerful Roman Catholic Church of the DRC – which had deployed more than 40,000 opinion poll monitors – as well as the Fayulu camp and other observers, SADC said that "a recount would provide the necessary reassurance for both winners as losers ".

A long-standing political crisis broke out two years ago when Kabila refused to resign at the end of his constitutional tenure, leading to massive protests brutally suppressed.

The infamously unstable country has not seen a peaceful transfer of power since the independence of Belgium in 1960.

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