The red scratch streaked on stone is the earliest evidence of a drawing made by humans

The first evidence of human-made art, dating back 73,000 years, has been found in an African cave. Scientists say that the drawing, which consists of three red lines with crossed lines and six separate lines, was "intentionally created". in a smooth fragment of rock (in the photo)

The first evidence of human-made art, dating back 73,000 years, has been discovered inside an African cave.

Scientists say that the drawing, which consists of three red lines with crossed lines and six separate lines, was "intentionally created". on a smooth rock.

The latest finding is earlier than previous drawings from Africa, Europe and Southeast Asia for at least 30,000 years, scientists say.

The first evidence of human-made art, dating back 73,000 years, has been found in an African cave. Scientists say that the drawing, which consists of three red lines with crossed lines and six separate lines, was "intentionally created". in a smooth fragment of rock (in the photo)

The first evidence of human-made art, dating back 73,000 years, has been found in an African cave. Scientists say that the drawing, which consists of three red lines with crossed lines and six separate lines, was "intentionally created". in a smooth fragment of rock (in the photo)

An abstract pattern has been engraved on this piece of ocher found in the Cave of Blombos, between the same layers of rock that produced the new find

An abstract pattern has been engraved on this piece of ocher found in the Cave of Blombos, between the same layers of rock that produced the new find

An abstract pattern has been engraved on this piece of ocher found in the Cave of Blombos, between the same layers of rock that produced the new find

The discovery was made by the archaeologist Dr. Luca Pollarolo, from the University of Witwatersrand, in the Cave of Blombos in the southern Cape area of ​​South Africa.

He studied meticulously through thousands of similar rock fragments that were excavated at the site while he was in the laboratory.

The cave of Blombos has been excavated by the main archaeologists, Professor Christopher Henshilwood and Dr. Karen van Niekerk since 1991.

It contains material dating from 100,000 to 70,000 years ago, a period of time known as the Middle Stone Age, as well as younger material, from the later Stone Age, dating back 2,000 or 300 years.

Realizing that the lines in the codend did not look like anything the team had found before in the cave, they set out to answer the questions he posed.

They came to the conclusion that the marks were made on purpose.

Professor Henshilwood said: "Prior to this discovery, Palaeolithic archaeologists have long been convinced that the unequivocal symbols first appeared when Homo sapiens entered Europe about 40,000 years ago, and later replaced the Neanderthals. local.

"Recent archaeological discoveries in Africa, Europe and Asia, in which members of our team have often participated, support a much earlier emergence for the production and use of symbols."

The finding predates previous drawings from Africa, Europe and Southeast Asia for at least 30,000 years. This silicon scale shows a pattern formed by nine lines drawn on one side with an ocher instrument

The finding predates previous drawings from Africa, Europe and Southeast Asia for at least 30,000 years. This silicon scale shows a pattern formed by nine lines drawn on one side with an ocher instrument

The finding predates previous drawings from Africa, Europe and Southeast Asia for at least 30,000 years. This silicon scale shows a pattern formed by nine lines drawn on one side with an ocher instrument

WHAT EXAMPLES OF HUMAN EARLY ART HAVE BEEN DISCOVERED WORLDWIDE?

It seems that humanity and its ancestors have been forced to create patterns, abstract images and representations of the world that surrounds them for thousands of years.

The oldest known engraving, a zig-zag pattern, incised in a freshwater shell from Trinil, Java, was found in layers of sediments from 540,000 years ago.

A recent article proposed that the representations painted in three caves of the Iberian Peninsula were 64,000 years old and, therefore, were produced by the Neanderthals.

The oldest known shell (above) that has been engraved by a primitive human has been discovered in a collection of a Dutch museum, where it remained unnoticed since the 1930s. Here its polished edge is depicted (below)

The oldest known shell (above) that has been engraved by a primitive human has been discovered in a collection of a Dutch museum, where it remained unnoticed since the 1930s. Here its polished edge is depicted (below)

The oldest known shell (above) that has been engraved by a primitive human has been discovered in a collection of a Dutch museum, where it remained unnoticed since the 1930s. Here its polished edge is depicted (below)

It is said that the real images found in places like the famous Lascaux cave in southwestern France, which date back around 30,000 years ago, demonstrate the ability to represent animal movements superior to those seen today.

In 2018, experts discovered evidence of human-made art dating back 73,000 years in an African cave.

Scientists say that the drawing, which consists of three red lines with crossed shading with six separate lines, was "intentionally created". in a smooth silicate scale.

That makes the drawing, found on the site of Blombos Caves in South Africa, the oldest drawing found by Homo sapiens, according to experts.

Under the guidance of the second author of the study, Professor Francesco d'Errico, of the University of Bordeaux in France, the team examined and photographed the piece under a microscope to establish if the lines were part of the stone or if it was applied to her.

To guarantee their results, they also examined the piece by using Raman spectroscopy and an electron microscope.

After confirming that the lines were applied to the stone, the team experimented with various painting and drawing techniques and discovered that the drawings were made with an ocher crayon, with a tip between one and three millimeters thick.

They said that the abrupt termination of the lines at the edge of the scale also suggested that the pattern originally extended over a larger area, and may have been more complex in its entirety.

The surprising discovery was made by the archaeologist Dr. Luca Pollarolo, from the University of Witwatersrand, in the cave of Blombos in the southern Cape area of ​​South Africa. This image shows the exterior of the cave

The surprising discovery was made by the archaeologist Dr. Luca Pollarolo, from the University of Witwatersrand, in the cave of Blombos in the southern Cape area of ​​South Africa. This image shows the exterior of the cave

The surprising discovery was made by the archaeologist Dr. Luca Pollarolo, from the University of Witwatersrand, in the cave of Blombos in the southern Cape area of ​​South Africa. This image shows the exterior of the cave

The cave of Blombos has been excavated by the main archaeologists, Professor Christopher Henshilwood and Dr. Karen van Niekerk since 1991.

The cave of Blombos has been excavated by the main archaeologists, Professor Christopher Henshilwood and Dr. Karen van Niekerk since 1991.

The cave of Blombos has been excavated by the main archaeologists, Professor Christopher Henshilwood and Dr. Karen van Niekerk since 1991.

WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT THE HISTORY OF THE AGE OF STONE?

The Stone Age is a period of human prehistory that is distinguished by the original development of stone tools that covers more than 95 percent of human technological prehistory.

It begins with the oldest known use of stone tools by hominids, ancient ancestors of humans, during the Ancient Stone Age, which began about 3.3 million years ago.

Between approximately 400,000 and 200,000 years ago, the pace of innovation in stone technology began to accelerate very slightly, a period known as the Middle Stone Age.

At the beginning of this time, the axes were made with an exquisite craftsmanship. This eventually gave way to smaller and more diverse tool kits, with an emphasis on flake tools instead of larger core tools.

The Stone Age is a period of human prehistory that is distinguished by the original development of stone tools that covers more than 95 percent of human technological prehistory. This image shows the Neolithic jadeite axes of the Toulouse Museum

The Stone Age is a period of human prehistory that is distinguished by the original development of stone tools that covers more than 95 percent of human technological prehistory. This image shows the Neolithic jadeite axes of the Toulouse Museum

The Stone Age is a period of human prehistory that is distinguished by the original development of stone tools that covers more than 95 percent of human technological prehistory. This image shows the Neolithic jadeite axes of the Toulouse Museum

These tools were established for at least 285,000 years in some parts of Africa, and for 250,000 to 200,000 years in Europe and parts of Western Asia. These toolkits last until at least 50,000 to 28,000 years ago.

During the Later Stone Age, the pace of innovations increased and the level of craftsmanship increased.

Groups of Homo sapiens experimented with various raw materials, including bone, ivory and antlers, as well as stone.

The period, between 50,000 and 39,000 years ago, is also associated with the advent of modern human behavior in Africa.

Different groups sought their own distinct cultural identity and adopted their own ways of doing things.

Later, the Stone Age peoples and their technologies spread out of Africa for the next thousands of years.

The oldest known engraving, a zig-zag pattern, incised in a freshwater shell from Trinil, Java, was found in layers dated 540,000 years ago.

A recent article proposed that the representations painted in three caves of the Iberian Peninsula were 64,000 years old and, therefore, were produced by the Neanderthals.

This makes the drawing of the silicon scale of Blombos the oldest drawing found by Homo sapiens.

The researchers said that the archaeological layer in which Blombos' drawing was found also produced other indicators of "symbolic thought" -including shell beads covered with ocher-and pieces of ocher engraved with abstract patterns.

They said that some of the engravings "look a lot like" the one drawn on the silicon scale.

Professor Henshilwood added: "This shows that the first Homo sapiens in the South Cape used different techniques to produce similar signs in different media.

"This observation supports the hypothesis that these signs were of a symbolic nature and represented an inherent aspect of the behavioral modern world of these African Homo sapiens, the ancestors of all of us today."

The findings were published in the journal Nature.

WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT OUR ANCESTORS?

Four important studies in recent times have changed the way we view our ancestral history.

The Simons Genome Diversity Project

After analyzing the DNA of 142 populations around the world, the researchers concluded that all modern humans living today can trace their ancestry to a single group that emerged in Africa 200,000 years ago.

They also discovered that all non-Africans seem to be descendants of a single group that separated from the ancestors of African hunters about 130,000 years ago.

The study also shows how humans seem to have formed isolated groups within Africa with populations on the continent that are separated from each other.

The KhoeSan in South Africa, for example, separated from the Yoruba in Nigeria about 87,000 years ago, while the Mbuti separated from the Yoruba 56,000 years ago.

The study of the Human Genome Diversity Panel of the Estonian Biocenter

This examined 483 genomes from 148 populations around the world to examine the spread of Homo sapiens outside of Africa.

They discovered that indigenous populations in modern Papua New Guinea owe two percent of their genomes to an extinct group of Homo sapiens.

This suggests that there was a distinct wave of human migration out of Africa about 120,000 years ago.

The Australian Aboriginal study

Using the genomes of 83 Australian aborigines and 25 Papua New Guineans, this study examined the genetic origins of these early Pacific populations.

It is believed that these groups have descended from some of the first humans who left Africa and raised doubts about whether their ancestors belonged to a wave of migration prior to the rest of Eurasia.

The new study found that the ancestors of modern Australian and Papuan aborigines separated from Europeans and Asians some 58,000 years ago after a single migration outside of Africa.

These two populations diverged later about 37,000 years ago, long before the physical separation of Australia and New Guinea about 10,000 years ago.

The Climate Modeling study

Researchers from the University of Hawaii at Mānoa used one of the first integrated computer models of climate and human migration to recreate the spread of Homo sapiens over the past 125,000 years.

The model simulates ice age, abrupt climate change and captures the arrival times of Homo sapiens in the eastern Mediterranean, the Arabian Peninsula, southern China and Australia, in close collaboration with paleoclimate reconstructions and fossil and archaeological evidence.

They discovered that modern humans seem to have left Africa 100,000 years ago in a series of slow-moving waves.

They estimate that Homo sapiens first arrived in southern Europe about 80,000 to 90,000 years ago, much earlier than previously thought.

The results challenge traditional models that suggest there was a single exodus out of Africa about 60,000 years ago.

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