The race expert reveals how to answer the five questions each boss asks in an interview

If you want to get the job of your dreams, handling yourself well in an interview is an absolute necessity (stock image)

If you want to get the job of your dreams, it is an absolute necessity that you handle yourself well in an interview.

While it is likely that you have done everything possible to ensure that your cover letter is polished and your resume shines, appearing unprepared can devastate your possibilities.

According to Australian career mentor Michelle Gibbings, an interview is your chance to really sell yourself, which means that every answer counts.

Here, the expert reveals the five most common questions a potential new boss could ask him, and how to answer them in a guaranteed way to impress.

If you want to get the job of your dreams, handling yourself well in an interview is an absolute necessity (stock image)

If you want to get the job of your dreams, handling yourself well in an interview is an absolute necessity (stock image)

Question 1: Tell me about you?

This question is generally considered an icebreaker and is usually the first time you may be asked.

It is designed to help an interviewee settle down while revealing a little about their personalities.

The key to answering this question, while remaining professional, is to keep it brief and relevant to the role you are requesting, Michelle said.

"The interviewer has already seen his CV, so they do not need a dismantling of each job," he told Daily Mail Australia.

"Instead, choose a couple of highlights from your career to date, and also inject some personality into the conversation to help the interviewer connect with you."

Question 2: What attracted you to this job?

Use this question as an opportunity to unite the research you have done on the company with which you hope to work with your skills and abilities.

"Show the interviewer that you have done your homework and investigate the company and understand what it does, its culture and its basic attributes," said Michelle.

Australian career mentor Michelle Gibbings (pictured) offers some ideas on how to handle common interview questions

Australian career mentor Michelle Gibbings (pictured) offers some ideas on how to handle common interview questions

Australian career mentor Michelle Gibbings (pictured) offers some ideas on how to handle common interview questions

"Talk enthusiastically about the company and its products, services or culture and explain how you feel your skills and attributes will benefit the company."

Question 3: Tell me about a moment when …?

Of all the questions that can be asked in an interview, this can often be one of the most complicated to answer.

Interviews explained by the expert often have a section that focuses on behavior and these types of questions can help demonstrate this.

Michelle said that the interviewer is likely to want him to choose a situation, explain what happened, the role he played, how he accomplished this and the result.

"People often feel uncomfortable using the word" I "in an interview, but in this situation, they should say" I did this … ".

"You can still emphasize what part of the team was involved, but do not neglect to highlight your role."

Question 4: What are you looking for in your next role?

This question gives you the opportunity to have a clear idea of ​​what you want from a role and, at the same time, to portray yourself positively.

"It's not time to list everything you do not want on paper," Michelle said.

Keep it positive, focused on the future and on how it will give tremendous value to the paper.

"For example, I could say:" I am ready to move to the next level, so I am eager to take on a broader and more challenging position. "

How to impress in an interview:

  • Arrive on time for the interview and dress for the job you want. Punctuality and cleanliness issues
  • Do your research, do not ask questions that could have found the answer by searching on Google
  • Be prepared and prepare to ask questions. If you do not ask questions, it may seem disinterested
  • Know why he wants the job and why he is the best candidate for him. Come ready to sell your value
  • Be friendly and friendly People hire people they like and want to work with

Question 5: Do you have any questions for us?

Follow-up questions are important because those who ask are not only better able to assess if a role is appropriate, but research shows that they tend to be more appreciated.

However, Michelle points out that the question or questions she asks will depend on what was discussed earlier in the interview.

The follow-up questions are important because those who ask are not only better able to evaluate if a role is suitable, but research shows that they tend to be of better taste (stock image)

The follow-up questions are important because those who ask are not only better able to evaluate if a role is suitable, but research shows that they tend to be of better taste (stock image)

The follow-up questions are important because those who ask are not only better able to evaluate if a role is suitable, but research shows that they tend to be of better taste (stock image)

She said she takes this opportunity to make it clear again that she wants the position and really wants to deliver value and contribute to the success of the organization.

His suggestion for the ideal question is this: "The paper is amazing and I would love the opportunity to work here. From your perspective, where are the greatest opportunities in this role to make a difference?"

"This clearly shows that you not only want the job, but you really want to make sure you deliver and add value."

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