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The president of Bentley says the company’s first electric luxury car could arrive in 2025

Bentley CEO says the company’s first electric luxury car could arrive as early as 2025 and believes the future is “all about electrification”

  • Adrian Hallmark, CEO and chairman of Bentley, is aiming for 2025 for the company’s first fully electric vehicle
  • The technology can lead to smaller cars without compromises in the interior
  • The company is waiting for viable solid-state batteries to make the change

According to CEO Adrian Hallmark, Bentley’s anticipated entry into the electric vehicle market could take place as early as 2025.

In a recent interview about the long-term plans of the luxury car manufacturer, Hallmark said, “it’s all about electrification.”

Hallmark promised that when the company enters the electric vehicle market, this will happen with a new design that is fully aligned with the electric drive system.

Bentley says it could start in 2025 with the release of its first fully electric vehicles. The company unveiled its first all-electric concept car, the EXP 100 GT (pictured above), in July this year

Bentley says it could start in 2025 with the release of its first fully electric vehicles. The company unveiled its first all-electric concept car, the EXP 100 GT (pictured above), in July this year

“We could take one of the existing nameplates, and that could be the first electric car, but we wouldn’t take an existing car and try to put batteries in, because there is a compromise from the point of view of range and efficiency,” Hallmark said.

According to Hallmark, one of the most important obstacles is the weight and bulk of current lithium-ion batteries.

He points to the recently released Jaguar I-Pace, the company’s first all-electric SUV that weighs heavily on a lithium-ion battery of nearly 1,600 pounds.

Hallmark believes that the use of solid-state batteries instead of lithium-ion batteries could reduce that weight by as much as 30 percent, creating a number of new options for designing a car with a smaller body but with the same interior size .

“We see the battery-electric vehicle architecture as a liberator of that potential,” he said Automotive News Europe.

Adrian Hallmark, CEO of Bentley (pictured above), wants the company's electric vehicles to use solid state batteries instead of lithium-ion batteries, believing that the first will be up to 30 percent lighter and smaller

Adrian Hallmark, CEO of Bentley (pictured above), wants the company's electric vehicles to use solid state batteries instead of lithium-ion batteries, believing that the first will be up to 30 percent lighter and smaller

Adrian Hallmark, CEO of Bentley (pictured above), wants the company’s electric vehicles to use solid state batteries instead of lithium-ion batteries, believing that the first will be up to 30 percent lighter and smaller

In addition to reducing the external scale, he is hopeful that new battery technology could make it possible to design cars that are lower to the ground, which would improve their aerodynamic performance and make them more energy efficient.

Last year the company took its first step towards a fully electric vehicle with the release of its first hybrid, a version of its popular SUV called the Bentayga Hybrid.

The company promised to have a hybrid option available by 2023 for each model in their current vehicle range.

The EXP 100 GT can go from zero to 60 km / h in 2.5 seconds and Bentley said the battery can be fully charged in just 15 minutes

The EXP 100 GT can go from zero to 60 km / h in 2.5 seconds and Bentley said the battery can be fully charged in just 15 minutes

The EXP 100 GT can go from zero to 60 km / h in 2.5 seconds and Bentley said the battery can be fully charged in just 15 minutes

Adrian Hallmark, CEO of Bentley, believes that solid-state battery cars can be designed to be closer to the ground than the current models, making them more aerodynamic and energy efficient

Adrian Hallmark, CEO of Bentley, believes that solid-state battery cars can be designed to be closer to the ground than the current models, making them more aerodynamic and energy efficient

Adrian Hallmark, CEO of Bentley, believes that solid-state battery cars can be designed to be closer to the ground than the current models, making them more aerodynamic and energy efficient

Earlier this year, Bentley unveiled a sleek and sporty all-electric concept car called the EXP 100 GT.

The company claimed that the car could go from zero to 60 km / h in 2.5 seconds and fully charge the battery in just 15 minutes.

In 2017, luxury car manufacturer Fisker patented its own solid-state battery and claimed that it could give an electric car a range of 500 km and be fully charged within a minute.

“This breakthrough marks the start of a new era in solid-state materials and production technologies,” Dr. said. Fabio Albano from Fisker at the time.

‘We are tackling all the obstacles that solid-state batteries have encountered on their way to commercialization, such as performance at low temperatures; the use of cheap and scalable production methods; and the ability to form bulk solid-state electrodes with a significant thickness and high active material loads.

“We are delighted to build on this basis and move the needle into energy storage.”

THE ADVANTAGES OF FIXED STATE

Batteries have three main components – the anode, cathode and electrolyte.

This electrolyte is typically a chemical that separates the anode and cathode and shifts the flow of electrical charge between the two.

The charge is caused by chemical reactions on the electrodes and most batteries in telephones, electric cars and the range of wireless vacuum cleaners from Sir James use lithium-ion (Li-ion) technology.

Li-ion batteries use a liquid electrolyte and because lithium is a highly reactive element, it stores a large amount of energy.

But this liquid electrolyte is often flammable and is blamed for batteries that burst in overheating, for example.

The SSBs from Sakti3 are based on the same Li-ion technology, but replace the liquid electrolyte with a coating of non-combustible metal.

This not only makes them safer for both consumers and the environment, but they are also more robust – liquid electrolytes can be easily damaged – and can be used at higher temperatures.

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