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Naomi Williams went to Tumut Hospital about 20 times between May 2015 and the day she died of meningococcal blood poisoning on January 1, 2016

& # 39; Deeply disturbing & # 39 ;: pregnant wife (27) and her unborn baby die hours after being sent home from the hospital with Panadol and an ice block

  • Wiradjuri woman Naomi Williams writhed in pain as she went to the hospital
  • Nurses sent her with Panadol and an ice block within 34 minutes
  • Mrs. Williams, 27, died of blood poisoning 15 hours later on January 1, 2016
  • She was 22 weeks pregnant with a son when she died of blood poisoning
  • Coroner said nurses could not have known that she had a life-threatening infection
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A coroner who & # 39; deep & # 39; has been in trouble due to the inadequate care of a pregnant woman in a national NSW hospital, more Aboriginal health care workers want to better reflect the local population.

Rescuer and Wiradjuri woman Naomi Williams went to Tumut Hospital about 20 times between May 2015 and the day she died of meningococcal-related blood poisoning on January 1, 2016.

By the time she was hurting at home and writhing at the door of death, she had lost faith in Tumut hospital, deputy coroner Harriet Grahame said Monday.

Naomi Williams went to Tumut Hospital about 20 times between May 2015 and the day she died of meningococcal blood poisoning on January 1, 2016

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Naomi Williams went to Tumut Hospital about 20 times between May 2015 and the day she died of meningococcal blood poisoning on January 1, 2016

The 27-year-old was never referred to an obstetrician or a bowel specialist despite the consistent reporting of nausea and vomiting before and after becoming pregnant.

Fifteen hours before her death, Mrs. Williams was presented to Tumut Hospital, treated by two emergency nurses, Panadol received an ice block and sent home within 34 minutes.

The coroner accepted that the two emergency nurses could not have known that Mrs. Williams had a life-threatening infection that would soon kill her.

But their failure to see a doctor, check on Mrs. Williams's history, or wonder why a pregnant woman would go to the hospital on New Year's Day, just for Panadol, had not helped.

& # 39; Curiosity in a safe environment may have kept Naomi long enough for a quick and appropriate intervention if her condition did not improve & Grahame said.

& # 39; At the very least a doctor should have been contacted by telephone for advice and management. & # 39;

Fifteen hours before her death, Mrs. Williams was presented to Tumut Hospital, treated by two emergency nurses, received Panadol, and sent home within 34 minutes. The coroner accepted that the two emergency nurses could not have known that Mrs. Williams had a life-threatening infection that would soon kill her
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Fifteen hours before her death, Mrs. Williams was presented to Tumut Hospital, treated by two emergency nurses, received Panadol, and sent home within 34 minutes. The coroner accepted that the two emergency nurses could not have known that Mrs. Williams had a life-threatening infection that would soon kill her

Fifteen hours before her death, Mrs. Williams was presented to Tumut Hospital, treated by two emergency nurses, received Panadol, and sent home within 34 minutes. The coroner accepted that the two emergency nurses could not have known that Mrs. Williams had a life-threatening infection that would soon kill her

Mrs. Williams writhed for hours at home before she collapsed at 1.30 p.m.

& # 39; It is very likely that her care experience in the early hours of that morning was a factor in her delayed representation later that day, & # 39; said the coroner.

& # 39; At first glance, the huge number of presentations before December 31, 2015, without specialist research, is very worrying. & # 39;

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The coroner also criticized Mrs. Williams's doctor because she seemed reluctant to play a proactive role in her care in 2015.

Of the nine recommendations, Ms. Grahame Murrumbidgee advised Local Health District – the operator of the Tumut hospital – to focus on the same proportion of indigenous population as the area it served at five percent.

She advised the health district to urgently implement a policy on exactly when emergency nurses can discharge patients and investigate the possibility of implicit bias.

Academic commentator Anita Heiss said that her cousin has a & # 39; radiant light in our lives & # 39; who was fond of movies, music, painting and writing poetry about the river and her family.

"We are reminded today that Naomi was desperately seeking help, but her pleas were not heard by the health service in Tumut," she told reporters.

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& # 39; Naomi was sick for a long time and no one listened to her or helped her. She was invisible to the health system. She did not like her as a person. & # 39;

The coroner advised that the health district should urgently implement a policy on when emergency nurses can fire patients and investigate the possibility of implicit bias (photo Naomi Williams Graham Kilby who spoke to the media at NSW Coroner & # 39; s Court in Lidcombe earlier in March) )

The coroner advised that the health district should urgently implement a policy on when emergency nurses can fire patients and investigate the possibility of implicit bias (photo Naomi Williams Graham Kilby who spoke to the media at NSW Coroner & # 39; s Court in Lidcombe earlier in March) )

The coroner advised that the health district should urgently implement a policy on when emergency nurses can fire patients and investigate the possibility of implicit bias (photo Naomi Williams Graham Kilby who spoke to the media at NSW Coroner & # 39; s Court in Lidcombe earlier in March) )

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