The permafrost of the world is getting warmer; Siberia is the most striking

Warning as the world's permafrost gets warmer with Siberia the worst hit

  • Temperatures increase by an average of 0.3 degrees Celsius (0.54 Fahrenheit) for a decade.
  • Largest rise in Siberia, where frozen ground temperatures rose between 2007 and 2016 by 0.9 degrees Celsius (1.62 Fahrenheit).

Associated Press

and
Mark Prigg for Dailymail.com

Scientists say the permafrost in the world is warmer, with temperatures rising by an average of 0.3 degrees Celsius (0.54 Fahrenheit) in ten years.

A study published on Wednesday found the biggest increase in Siberia, where frozen ground temperatures rose by 0.9 degrees Celsius (1.62 Fahrenheit) between 2007 and 2016.

Researchers working on the worldwide terrestrial network for Permafrost collected useful data for the entire period from 123 boreholes in the Arctic, Antarctic and high mountain ranges of Europe and Central Asia.

Researchers working on the worldwide terrestrial network for Permafrost collected useful data for the entire period from 123 boreholes in the Arctic, Antarctic and high mountain ranges of Europe and Central Asia. The Russian scientists Sergey Zimov and his son Nikita Zimov depicted air samples from frozen ground near the town of Chersky in Siberia 6,600 km (4,000 miles) east of Moscow, Russia

Researchers working on the worldwide terrestrial network for Permafrost collected useful data for the entire period from 123 boreholes in the Arctic, Antarctic and high mountain ranges of Europe and Central Asia. The Russian scientists Sergey Zimov and his son Nikita Zimov depicted air samples from frozen ground near the town of Chersky in Siberia 6,600 km (4,000 miles) east of Moscow, Russia

WHAT IS PERMAFROST?

Permafrost is soil that has been frozen for at least two years.

As a result of this long-term cryogenic state, the country stores large amounts of carbon and other nutrients from organic material.

It represents a "large carbon reservoir", according to scientists, that is slowly released into the atmosphere while the permafrost thaws.

The temperature rose by 71, dropped at 12 and remained unchanged at 40.

Scientists say that the increases follow the greenhouse effect in general.

They noted that permac- ity – which has already been established at five of the sites – contains organic matter that can emit greenhouse gases, which further fuels climate change.

All these data tell us that the permafrost does not simply heat up on a local and regional scale, but globally and at almost the same rate as global warming, which produces a significant warming of the air and an increased snow thickness, especially in the Arctic, & # 39, said Prof. Guido Grosse, head of the Permafrost Research Section at the Alfred Wegener Institute in Potsdam.

These two factors in turn cause a warming of the once permanently frozen soil. & # 39;

According to Professor Hanne H. Christiansen, co-author of the study and chair of the International Permafrost Association (IPA), the permafrost temperature is one of the most widely accepted climate variables.

A family Nenets in the city of Nadym, in northern Siberia, Yamal-Nenets region, 2500 km (about 1553 miles) northeast of Moscow, Russia.

A family Nenets in the city of Nadym, in northern Siberia, Yamal-Nenets region, 2500 km (about 1553 miles) northeast of Moscow, Russia.

A family Nenets in the city of Nadym, in northern Siberia, Yamal-Nenets region, 2500 km (about 1553 miles) northeast of Moscow, Russia.

It gives a direct insight into how the frozen soil reacts to climate change & explains, explains the researcher.

& # 39; This information is especially essential in those permafrost regions where the soil has already become warmer or started to thaw, causing great damage when the ground winds and destabilizes roads and buildings. & # 39;

Permafrost is soil that has been frozen for at least two years.

As a result of this long-term cryogenic state, the country stores large amounts of carbon and other nutrients from organic material.

It represents a "large carbon reservoir", according to scientists, that is slowly released into the atmosphere while the permafrost thaws.

Previous research into the composition of the permafrost in the world suggests that it contains more than 1,000 billion tons of carbon.

About 24 percent of the land in the northern hemisphere is covered with permafrost.

When frozen ground thaws, it can collapse to form marshes or fens whose internal microbes can attack the previously frozen carbon in the soil, as well as new carbon from the growth of plants.

Knowing how the activities of these microbes contribute to carbon dioxide and methane in the atmosphere is a challenge.

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