The parking law you never knew existed: the police can fine drivers for leaving their doors unlocked

Queensland police visited the Caloundra parking lot in Stockland on Tuesday morning and found 22 vehicles with unlocked doors

Drivers can be fined for leaving their car doors unlocked under a parking law that most people do not know.

Police officers from Queensland visited the parking lot of Stockland Mall in Caloundra, 95 km north of Brisbane, on Tuesday morning and found 22 vehicles with unlocked doors.

During the operation, no fines were issued, just a friendly reminder from the community for people to block their cars.

The Sunshine Coast district superintendent, district officer Darryl Johnson, said: "It is an offense to leave the car unlocked."

Queensland police visited the Caloundra parking lot in Stockland on Tuesday morning and found 22 vehicles with unlocked doors

Queensland police visited the Caloundra parking lot in Stockland on Tuesday morning and found 22 vehicles with unlocked doors

Owners of vehicles with closed cars also received a letter on the windshield congratulating them for leaving their vehicle blocked.

On the east coast of Australia, the law stipulates that drivers must block their vehicle if they are more than three meters away.

Otherwise, the police can issue a fine in New South Wales, Victoria and Queensland.

"We are trying to reinforce that people should take responsibility for their own actions, their own property and prevent thieves from gaining access to their vehicles," said Superintendent Johnson.

"The criminal element in our society will take advantage of the opportunity in parking lots like this to run the risk of checking the cars and choosing the ones that are unlocked and it's easy to choose that way".

In New South Wales, the police can issue a fine of $ 108, a fine of $ 40 in Queensland and $ 117 in Victoria

In New South Wales, the police can issue a fine of $ 108, a fine of $ 40 in Queensland and $ 117 in Victoria

In New South Wales, the police can issue a fine of $ 108, a fine of $ 40 in Queensland and $ 117 in Victoria

ROAD TRANSPORTATION ACT 2013 (NSW)

ROUTE RULES 2014 (CONSOLIDATED ACT OF NSW)

Section 213 that secures a motor vehicle

(5) If the driver is more than 3 meters from the nearest part and no one is left in the vehicle, the driver must:

(a) if the vehicle's windows can be secured-, secure the windows immediately before leaving the vehicle

(b) If the vehicle doors can be locked, you can lock the doors immediately after leaving the vehicle

In New South Wales, the police can issue a fine of $ 108, while a fine of $ 40 applies in Queensland and $ 117 in Victoria.

While the rule of the road rarely applies, the police have the option of using it.

A neighbor told 7News: "When I was little, you left your house open: windows, doors and everything.

"You would arrive home and it would remain the same, but today I would not leave without being locked up."

Detective Inspector Brad Ainsworth told ABC: "It would be a bad day when we have to do that, but that is one of the options we have in the sleeve."

The chairman of the Civil Liberties Council of NSW, Stephen Blanks, said: "The police should not do that kind of thing without a warrant, and the mere fact that a car is unlocked is no cause for suspicion that there is something illegal at".

"If they do that kind of activity, they will lose the support of the community and already require strong support from the community to do their job well."

According to statistics from the National Council for the Reduction of Motor Vehicle Theft, in 2017 there were 12,216 robberies of motor vehicles in New South Wales, 11,125 in QLD and 15,332 in Victoria.

According to statistics from the National Council for the Reduction of Motor Vehicle Theft, in 2017 there were 12,216 robberies of motor vehicles in New South Wales, 11,125 in QLD and 15,332 in Victoria.

According to statistics from the National Council for the Reduction of Motor Vehicle Theft, in 2017 there were 12,216 robberies of motor vehicles in New South Wales, 11,125 in QLD and 15,332 in Victoria.

According to statistics from the National Council for the Reduction of Motor Vehicle Theft, in 2017 there were 12,216 motor vehicle thefts in New South Wales, 11,125 in QLD and 15,332 in Victoria.

The car's lightning attack enraged the Sunshine Coast community with a resident who traveled to Facebook to comment: "Charge the innocent and protect the guilty. Typical bulls ***.

Another Facebook user wrote: "As far as I'm concerned, he's getting into someone's vehicle."

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