The parents say they did not know that the daughter accused of killing the baby was pregnant

The parents of Skylar Richardson, who has been accused of murdering and burying her newborn daughter, said they had no idea she was pregnant because she was recovering from the anorexic. Skylar is represented here on her graduation night, two days before giving birth

Skylar Richardson was so afraid of calories that she refused to chew gum.

Then, when the cheerleader, who had been fighting anorexia for two years, began to gain weight, her parents Kim and Scott were ecstatic.

But then, a month before he started college, the police accused Skylar of killing and burying his baby in the backyard days after his graduation in May 2017.

The 19-year-old girl has maintained that she buried the baby after she was born dead, and her parents say they never realized that her daughter was pregnant.

At that time, they were happy to have gained some weight.

The parents of Skylar Richardson, who has been accused of murdering and burying her newborn daughter, said they had no idea she was pregnant because she was recovering from the anorexic. Skylar is represented here on her graduation night, two days before giving birth

The parents of Skylar Richardson, who has been accused of murdering and burying her newborn daughter, said they had no idea she was pregnant because she was recovering from the anorexic. Skylar is represented here on her graduation night, two days before giving birth

Skylar (photographed during a preliminary hearing in April) was charged with aggravated murder and involuntary manslaughter in July 2017. She is still awaiting trial

Skylar (photographed during a preliminary hearing in April) was charged with aggravated murder and involuntary manslaughter in July 2017. She is still awaiting trial

Skylar (photographed during a preliminary hearing in April) was charged with aggravated murder and involuntary manslaughter in July 2017. She is still awaiting trial

"If she had come to me and said she was pregnant, she would have said, 'Okay, it's not exactly in the cards, but we'll fix it,' Kim told the Cincinnati Enquirer.

"That would have been easier to treat than this eating disorder."

While Skylar was able to hide his disorder behind his bubbling personality, anorexia came to light after he almost fainted in a cheerleading competition.

Skylar, who was 16 at the time, saw several counselors as her weight continued to fluctuate, and she dropped to 90 pounds on her 5-foot-1 frame.

I can not describe it. When your child does not eat chewing gum or is worried about toothpaste and can not do anything about it, "Kim recalled.

Prosecutors say Skylar killed her newborn because she and her family wanted to keep their perfect image in their small Ohio community.

Prosecutors say Skylar killed her newborn because she and her family wanted to keep their perfect image in their small Ohio community.

Prosecutors say Skylar killed her newborn because she and her family wanted to keep their perfect image in their small Ohio community.

Skylar's aunt, Vanessa, said the teenager "in no way, shape or form" seemed pregnant when they went on a spring break trip in her senior year.

"I was happy because I was like, Oh, she met this nice guy, she does not care what she looks like anymore, she does not care if it's getting thick," Vanessa told Cosmopolitan.

"I mean, the eating disorders were always horrible, so we were all like," Oh, yes! She is putting on weight. "

Looking back at the picture of Skylar's prom, taken two days before giving birth, Vanessa said she can now see the pothole.

"We hate each other for that now," he said. "But at that moment, we just thought that she was eating well and did not get sick." She looked curvy and radiant.

But County Attorney David Fornshell, who has called himself "extraordinarily pro-life," painted a very different image of Skylar and his family, saying they were desperate to maintain their perfect image.

"Skylar and his family, particularly his mother, were quite obsessed with external appearances and how things seemed to the outside world," he told a news conference after the young man was charged.

You have a situation where, you know, she's a nice fresh graduate from high school. She was a cheerleader, she described a good girl for her lawyer.

"And I think that kind of perception is one that Skylar wanted to perpetuate and that his mother wanted to perpetuate."

It was also Fornshell who claimed that Skylar not only buried her dead baby, but also burned the body of the newborn girl.

But the family said they were overjoyed when Skylar (pictured in December 2017) started gaining weight after struggling with anorexia for years.

But the family said they were overjoyed when Skylar (pictured in December 2017) started gaining weight after struggling with anorexia for years.

But the family said they were overjoyed when Skylar (pictured in December 2017) started gaining weight after struggling with anorexia for years.

Her story of a cheerleader guided by appearances that would kill, burn and bury her newborn immediately took off.

"Our lives changed completely that day," Kim said. & # 39; And now this is our new normality & # 39;

Two Facebook pages, once dubbed & # 39; Justice for baby Doe in Carlisle, Ohio & # 39; and Justice for Baby Carlisle, were created quickly after the charges were announced.

The description of the second group, which since then was modified, originally said: "Our goal here is to support justice for Baby Carlisle." Baby Carlisle is the newborn baby who was born alive, then killed, burned and his charred bones buried in a grave shallow behind the house of "The monster mom" that belongs to their parents.

Terri Schneider, one of the group's administrators, often parks her car in front of Skylar's house so she can take pictures of her family on Facebook.

Members often record family videos when they come and go, posting frequent updates on their whereabouts.

They were especially angry when Skylar received a modified house arrest in April, and a judge ruled that he would. have a curfew from 9pm to 7am and be monitored through GPS monitoring and random home visits.

& # 39; Baby Killer! & # 39; Some spat on the sidewalk and shouted when they saw Skylar. & # 39; Assassin! & # 39; others shout

Skylar's aunt, Vanessa, said the teenager "in no way, shape or form" seemed pregnant when they went on a spring break together in her senior year

Skylar's aunt, Vanessa, said the teenager "in no way, shape or form" seemed pregnant when they went on a spring break together in her senior year

Skylar's aunt, Vanessa, said the teenager "in no way, shape or form" seemed pregnant when they went on a spring break together in her senior year

Since then, the family has had to place black curtains in the patio of their backyard. They often find cars parked outside their home. They are no longer welcome in your church.

Kim also started taking medications for anxiety and insomnia.

"I still wake up with a cold sweat believing that Skylar is going to take," he said.

Skylar's defense lawyers criticized prosecutors for "a false narrative" that sensationalized the case.

They say that the teenager did not kill her baby, and that an expert witness concluded that there were no signs of burns or trauma that would have caused the baby's death.

"What started as an 18-year-old high school girl who was scared and sad to have given birth to a dead baby whom she called Annabelle and then tell her doctor about the dead and the burial in the yard became something sinister and grotesque, "they said in a motion to move the trial.

Skylar was charged with aggravated murder, involuntary manslaughter, endangering children, tampering with evidence and serious body abuse in July 2017.

She has been awaiting trial since her defense team works to prevent prosecutors from presenting testimonies from medical staff of an obstetrics and gynecology practice, citing physician-patient privilege.

The case has become a sensation in the small town of Carlisle, Ohio, where people often follow Skylar, who is in modified house arrest, and take pictures of her for Facebook groups.

The case has become a sensation in the small town of Carlisle, Ohio, where people often follow Skylar, who is in modified house arrest, and take pictures of her for Facebook groups.

The case has become a sensation in the small town of Carlisle, Ohio, where people often follow Skylar, who is in modified house arrest, and take pictures of her for Facebook groups.

Prosecutors argued that the privilege does not apply in this case, but ultimately were overthrown and forced to delay the start of the trial without that crucial evidence.

A September 11 hearing is scheduled at the 12th District Court of Appeals. There is still no set date for a test.

Authorities first learned of a doctor's baby that Skylar had visited for the first time a few weeks before giving birth.

When she visited again, Skylar tearfully admitted that the baby had been born dead and she had buried him. The coroner's office contacted the police.

After the police arrived at their home, Skylar told them that she had given birth to a girl, whom she called Annabelle, around 3 am on May 7, 2017.

She said her daughter never opened her eyes and Skylar cradled her for hours, hoping she would show some sign of life.

A September 11 hearing is scheduled at the 12th District Court of Appeals. There is still no set date for Skylar's trial. She is photographed here in September of 2017

A September 11 hearing is scheduled at the 12th District Court of Appeals. There is still no set date for Skylar's trial. She is photographed here in September of 2017

A September 11 hearing is scheduled at the 12th District Court of Appeals. There is still no set date for Skylar's trial. She is photographed here in September of 2017

When none came, the teenager buried her in a place in the yard that she could see from the window of her room, digging the hole with a small garden sword.

Then he took pink rose petals, which he had used at the prom, and then left them in his family's fire pit in the backyard, and scattered them over his daughter's grave.

A forensic expert who claimed that Annabelle had been burned retracted her claim. A second expert also confirmed that there were no signs of the baby being burned.

While still awaiting trial, Skylar, who was scheduled to start at the University of Cincinnati in the fall of 2017, is living a life in abeyance.

And Kim is dreaming of the granddaughter he never came to appreciate.

"Now I would be a year old and walk," Kim said. "It's so hard to believe that I had a grandchild I never had."

.