The painful struggle of parents to raise $ 100,000 after one of their twin boys was born without an anus

Parents' painful struggle to raise $ 100,000 after one of their twin boys was born without an anus that needed 8 debilitating months in the hospital, 7 surgeries and more

  • Jackson Kuhn was born with a skin that covered his anus and requires seven operations
  • Unacceptability affects 1 in every 5,000 births, disproportionate boys
  • It struck his fragile body hard, causing him to fall sick regularly
  • He is home now, but he still needs a colostomy bag and has to wait to grow before he can undergo a reconstruction operation
  • His parents say that every minute with him is worth it, but they are & # 39; stressed and depressed & # 39; by the attack of medical care and medical bills
  • Click here to donate to their GoFundMe

A baby boy born without an anus last summer is finally going home after doctors have been trying for months to correct his birth defect.

Jackson Brian Kuhn has a twin brother, Jamison, who was born defectively and was fired days after he was born in July in Pennsylvania.

But Jackson, born with skin covering his anus, endured a difficult start and underwent seven surgeries, causing a severe blow to his fragile body, making him routinely sick.

Finally, after eight months, doctors decided that Jackson could go home, although he still needs a colostomy bag and has to wait a few months to be ready for a full reconstruction operation.

Struggling with the turmoil of medical bills, his parents, Andrew Kuhn and Katie Faulkner, were urged by friends to set up a GoFundMe page.

Jackson Brian Kuhn has a twin brother, Jamison, who was born defectively and was fired days after his birth in Pennsylvania in July

Jackson Brian Kuhn has a twin brother, Jamison, who was born defectively and was fired days after his birth in Pennsylvania in July

Jackson

Jackson

Jackson and Jamison with mother Katie

Jackson and Jamison with mother Katie

Shortly after the boys were born, the doctors stopped when they looked at Jackson and Andrew in a nerve-racking few minutes, who were still crazy about the operation

& # 39; He is already a strong boy and is going to have a strong fight & # 39 ;, wrote Kuhn on the page.

& # 39; Thank you all for your love and support. I am not a charity person, but I would just like to pray for everyone to pass on for this family. & # 39;

The couple recently spoke to Fox 43 about the nerve-racking moment in the delivery room when their doctors became silent.

Their two boys were both delivered through the C-section, but when the doctors cleaned them up, they worked slower, studied closer and talked mutually.

& # 39; I saw that they were examining one of the baby & # 39; s, they had the other and took him and there were a number of doctors nearby, & # 39; Kuhn said.

& # 39; I was just like something doesn't seem right, something doesn't feel right. & # 39;

The doctors came back and informed them that Jackson had an imperforate anus, affecting one in 5000 babies, and is more common in boys.

It is normally linked to other rectum abnormalities, but immediate care is reconstruction surgery to remove the extra piece of skin.

The little boys who share a moment together. Despite Jackson & # 39; s trials, they are close by

The little boys who share a moment together. Despite Jackson & # 39; s trials, they are close by

The little boys who share a moment together. Despite Jackson & # 39; s trials, they are close by

It is not clear why children develop an imperforate anus, but it is clear that it happens very early in pregnancy – about five to seven weeks.

The exact type of operation that they need depends on their defect.

Some have a rectum that is severely underdeveloped and requires surgeons to attach it to the new rectum that they have surgically formed. They may also need to work with the surrounding organs to ensure that they are not connected to the rectum.

In addition to the emotional ordeal, the Kuhn-Faulkner family has financial setbacks.

To keep up, they need a dazzling $ 100,000.

& # 39; You feel depressed and stressed every day as you think what will happen and what bill will appear in the post afterwards, & # 39; Kuhn said to Fox.

But he added: "Just seeing his smiling face every day at our house beats every bill."