The operation of the Apple-1 computer built in the 1970s is under auction

A piece of computer history that helped launch a trillion dollar company is coming to the auction block and is expected to sell for $ 300,000 (£ 230,500)

A part of the history of the computer that helped launch a trillion dollar company is coming to the auction block and is expected to reach $ 300,000 (£ 230,500).

A rare and fully functioning Apple-1 auctioned by the Boston RR Auction in September is one of the approximately 60 remaining computers out of the original 200 manufactured.

The machines were designed and built by hand by Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak in 1976 and 1977 and originally sold for around $ 666 (£ 511) to local enthusiasts.

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A piece of computer history that helped launch a trillion dollar company is coming to the auction block and is expected to sell for $ 300,000 (£ 230,500)

A piece of computer history that helped launch a trillion dollar company is coming to the auction block and is expected to sell for $ 300,000 (£ 230,500)

Apple-1 was restored to its original operating status by expert Corey Cohen.

The system ran flawlessly for approximately eight hours on a recent test and will even ship with its original keyboard designed and built during the 1970s.

The co-founder of Apple Wozniak and Jobs only produced 150 models of the Apple-1 to sell to their friends and family.

The pair began to market the computer system to the electronics chain Byte Shop in 1976, after the retailer bought the first 50 units.

Originally they went on sale for $ 666.66 since Wozniak liked to repeat numbers.

Although Apple-1 is famous for being the first consumer PC that is shipped ready to use with monitor and keyboard, it was delivered as just the motherboard.

This meant that users had to grab a power supply, keyboard, monitor and cassette recorder before they could use the device.

A fully-functioning Apple-1 auctioned for the RR RR Auction in Boston in September is one of the remaining 60 of the original 200

A fully-functioning Apple-1 auctioned for the RR RR Auction in Boston in September is one of the remaining 60 of the original 200

A fully-functioning Apple-1 auctioned for the RR RR Auction in Boston in September is one of the remaining 60 of the original 200

The machines were designed and built by Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak in 1976 and 1977 and originally sold for around $ 666 (£ 511)

The machines were designed and built by Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak in 1976 and 1977 and originally sold for around $ 666 (£ 511)

The machines were designed and built by Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak in 1976 and 1977 and originally sold for around $ 666 (£ 511)

WHAT IS APPLE 1?

Apple co-founders Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak created the Apple-1 personal computer in 1976 and presented it at a computer club in Palo Alto.

However, there were few takers at that time.

Paul Terrell, owner of a retail chain called Byte Shop, placed an order for 50 of the machines and sold them for $ 666.66 (£ 420) retail, once Wozniak and Jobs agreed to assemble the circuit boards instead of offering them as kits.

It is believed that the usual price was chosen because Wozniak liked to repeat the digits.

Wozniak and Jobs made 150 more Apple-1 machines by hand and sold them to friends and other suppliers.

It is believed that less than 50 original Apple-1s have been preserved, and it is known that only eight are able to function.

Apple 1 did not have a keyboard or monitor, which meant that users had to provide theirs before they could use the computer.

It also had a small 8K memory, tiny according to current standards.

Jobs sent them directly to garage buyers from his parents' house.

It is not known how many were sold during 1976, but by April 1977 the price had been reduced to $ 475 (£ 300).

Apple's first computer helped kick-start a technology revolution that took affordable computers out of science labs and took them to people's homes.

Apple II was introduced in April 1977 with an integrated keyboard, sound, a plastic housing and eight internal expansion slots.

When it was suspended in October 1977, about 200 Apple 1 had been produced.

It is believed that only between 30 and 50 of the computers still exist today.

Most of the first computers used different motherboards for each component inside the computer, however, Wozniak decided to put them on a single board.

Wozniak chose to use a keyboard instead of the front panel switches that appeared on other older computers to make it easier to use.

A cassette recorder was used to store and load software in the machine.

The screen was slow according to current standards, showing about 60 individual characters per second.

It only ships with about 8K of built-in memory. For 8K reference, it is enough to save a 1,000 word document.

It shows the humble beginnings of Apple, based in Cupertino, California, which recently became the first public company in the world to be valued at $ 1 trillion (£ 0.8 trillion).

It was restored to its original operating status by Apple expert Corey Cohen. The system was operated without failures for approximately eight hours in a test and even includes the original keyboard of the 1970s

It was restored to its original operating status by Apple expert Corey Cohen. The system was operated without failures for approximately eight hours in a test and even includes the original keyboard of the 1970s

It was restored to its original operating status by Apple expert Corey Cohen. The system was operated without failures for approximately eight hours in a test and even includes the original keyboard of the 1970s

The couple only produced 150 models to sell to their friends and family. Wozniak started to market it together with Jobs through the electronics chain Byte Shop in 1976, after the retailer bought the first 50 units.

The couple only produced 150 models to sell to their friends and family. Wozniak started to market it together with Jobs through the electronics chain Byte Shop in 1976, after the retailer bought the first 50 units.

The couple only produced 150 models to sell to their friends and family. Wozniak started to market it together with Jobs through the electronics chain Byte Shop in 1976, after the retailer bought the first 50 units.

They originally went on sale for $ 666.66 since Wozniak liked to repeat numbers

They originally went on sale for $ 666.66 since Wozniak liked to repeat numbers

They originally went on sale for $ 666.66 since Wozniak liked to repeat numbers

Last year, it was revealed that a 30-year-old Mac SE had been revived.

Ewen Rankin, a photographer from Birmingham, brought a 30-year-old Mac SE to the store in Solihull, hoping to revive the retro device.

Surprisingly, five staff members were able to work together to resuscitate the computer, which was built in 1987.

Rankin's computer is one of five prototypes manufactured by Apple in California for development purposes, and then shipped to the United Kingdom in 1987.

For the past 25 years, the Mac SE had been inactive at Rankin's house, before he was interested in testing whether it would still work today.

Despite being the first PC that was ready to use with monitor and keyboard access, it was delivered as just the motherboard

Despite being the first PC that was ready to use with monitor and keyboard access, it was delivered as just the motherboard

Despite being the first PC that was ready to use with monitor and keyboard access, it was delivered as just the motherboard

This meant that users had to grab a power supply, keyboard, monitor and cassette recorder of their property

This meant that users had to grab a power supply, keyboard, monitor and cassette recorder of their property

This meant that users had to grab a power supply, keyboard, monitor and cassette recorder of their property

Most older computers used different motherboards for each component, but Wozniak decided to put them on a single board. In the photo is the operation manual

Most older computers used different motherboards for each component, but Wozniak decided to put them on a single board. In the photo is the operation manual

Most older computers used different motherboards for each component, but Wozniak decided to put them on a single board. In the photo is the operation manual

Speaking to Apple World Today, Rankin said: "I could have tried, but I thought it was more fun to test Apple and see if they were willing to try to help the 30-year-old machine come back to life … and they did & # 39;

At the Solihull store, the staff was able to boot the computer with OS 3.3, but the old mouse refused to work.

Mark Sisson, who helped Rankin in his quest to repair the computer, told Apple World Today: "The original prototypes were equipped with Sony 20MB disk drives and were prone to & # 39; stiction & # 39; as we call it where the read / write head get caught in the dishes.

"The solution was to remove the disk and then rotate hard the hard drive back and forth with the hand to try to loosen the plates before putting it back, where often it would work well.

"Apple subsequently replaced these with 40MB Quantum discs."

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