The only simple trick that could reduce your energy bills by half

Australians could cut their energy bills by 40 percent through nighttime window opening ventilation strategy (stock image)

Australians could cut their energy bills in half with a simple trick, the researchers revealed.

The window opening night ventilation strategy could be key to reducing Australia's exorbitant energy prices by 40 percent.

This would alter the nations' dependence on air conditioning and the expensive bills associated with the cooling system.

The revelation came after researchers studied ventilation strategies for two years, news.com.au reported.

Australians could cut their energy bills by 40 percent through nighttime window opening ventilation strategy (stock image)

Australians could cut their energy bills by 40 percent through nighttime window opening ventilation strategy (stock image)

The study determined the most effective measures for cooling unoccupied office buildings, but could be extended to the average home, says Griffith University researcher Dr. Henry Skates.

Dr. Skates said that it is possible to reduce the dependence on air conditioning during the day through night ventilation strategies to expel hot air.

"The main problem is that you really need to be ventilating at night and get fresh air through the building," said Dr. Skates.

& # 39; Isolation took a bad hit a while ago under Howard's government, but it's one of the best ways to save on energy. & # 39;

Dr. Skates, who specializes in architectural technology, said that ventilation strategies would be more relevant to the rising costs of energy.

Social media users responded to the research, arguing that it would not be a sufficient method to reduce costs since temperatures remain high during the summer.

They were also concerned about the increase in criminal activity that could occur with open windows.

"Yes, because I want the 30C heat to circulate around my house while I'm trying to sleep … I think I'll put the air conditioning in thanks," argued one person.

The study determined the most effective measures to cool unoccupied office buildings, but could be extended to the average home, said Griffith University researcher Dr. Henry Skates (stock image)

The study determined the most effective measures to cool unoccupied office buildings, but could be extended to the average home, said Griffith University researcher Dr. Henry Skates (stock image)

The study determined the most effective measures to cool unoccupied office buildings, but could be extended to the average home, said Griffith University researcher Dr. Henry Skates (stock image)

Researchers want to encourage Australians to adopt ventilation strategies because they reduce greenhouse gas emissions and can be an intelligent way to reduce construction maintenance costs.

Dr. Skates said that building managers and developers will find that research is beneficial, since energy efficient sites are more attractive to a potential buyer because of lower operating costs.

It also recognizes that ventilation strategies should only be used in the appropriate circumstances, when there is an obvious difference in daytime and nighttime temperatures.

"As energy prices rise, and they will, it becomes an important part of a company's operating cost, so it can significantly reduce its bottom line."

The study was the first Australian review of night ventilation strategies, covering all major cities in the country.

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