The old Scottish model reveals how she became the director of a funeral home

Raegan Drew, 28, of Midlothian, Scotland, switched to a potential career in the beauty industry to work with corpses after realizing she wanted to be a funeral director. Here she is depicted with a hearse at the Grange cemetery in Edinburgh

A woman who trained a beautician has revealed how she abandoned her career in cosmetics to become a Funeral director.

At age 18, Raegan Drew, now 28, from Midlothian, Scotland became I was juggling a job at McDonalds with Studying to get a beauty rating and also modeling.

Despite being represented by the leading agency The Model Team in Scotland, she decided that a career in modeling or beauty was not what she wanted and started looking for other ways to apply her knowledge, finding the idea of ​​embalming corpses.

Now she has worked to be a funeral director after deciding that she wanted to participate in the whole process, and despite being surrounded by people at the saddest moment of their lives, she insists that it is enormously rewarding.

"We can help people and support grieving families when they need it the most and if at the end of a funeral, a family says, 'Thank you, that was perfect.' we've done our job and it's the best feeling, "he told Femail.

"I really could not think of a more rewarding job than what I do."

Raegan Drew, 28, of Midlothian, Scotland, switched to a potential career in the beauty industry to work with corpses after realizing she wanted to be a funeral director. Here she is depicted with a hearse at the Grange cemetery in Edinburgh

Raegan Drew, 28, of Midlothian, Scotland, switched to a potential career in the beauty industry to work with corpses after realizing she wanted to be a funeral director. Here she is depicted with a hearse at the Grange cemetery in Edinburgh

Raegan had his first vision of embalming while doing a job experience in a small funeral director.

She was captivated by the work and went on to finance a private embalming course for her.

"I do not know what led me to study embalming, but once I decided what I wanted to do, I relentlessly applied for a year to several funeral homes throughout Scotland," he said.

"After an initial rejection of an interview, I decided to send a letter to Co-op Funeralcare every month for another year, which eventually led to a second interview when a post as a funeral arranger became available.

At age 18, Raegan juggled a job at McDonalds to study for a beauty qualification and a part-time model. However, she said that she knew that none of this interested her as a career and that her interest was awakened later by embalming.

At age 18, Raegan juggled a job at McDonalds to study for a beauty qualification and a part-time model. However, she said that she knew that none of this interested her as a career and that her interest was awakened later by embalming.

At age 18, Raegan juggled a job at McDonalds to study for a beauty qualification and a part-time model. However, she said that she knew that none of this interested her as a career and that her interest was awakened later by embalming.

Raegan was rejected when requesting a job initially, but he sent Co-op Funeralcare a letter every month for another year and finally managed to get a job. Here she is photographed with her brother

Raegan was rejected when requesting a job initially, but he sent Co-op Funeralcare a letter every month for another year and finally managed to get a job. Here she is photographed with her brother

Raegan was rejected when requesting a job initially, but he sent Co-op Funeralcare a letter every month for another year and finally managed to get a job. Here she is photographed with her brother

"I got the job and after getting my qualification in this position, I became a funeral director." My ambition to become an embalmer changed when I decided I wanted to participate in the funeral process from beginning to end.

In explaining his day-to-day role, Raegan said he is with the deceased's friends and family from the beginning of planning to the day of the funeral.

"As a funeral director, my role is to be there with the client from beginning to end, making sure that all of their wishes are carried out exactly as agreed," he said.

"I will book the funeral, the officiant, I will organize the transport, the wake, I will devise the order of the service, I will order flowers, a gravestone and everything they want.

Raegan, second from the left, says that in her function as funeral director, she should be there with the client from beginning to end, making sure that all her wishes are carried out exactly as agreed. Here she is photographed with friends who are very proud of her career

Raegan, second from the left, says that in her function as funeral director, she should be there with the client from beginning to end, making sure that all her wishes are carried out exactly as agreed. Here she is photographed with friends who are very proud of her career

Raegan, second from the left, says that in her function as funeral director, she should be there with the client from beginning to end, making sure that all her wishes are carried out exactly as agreed. Here she is photographed with friends who are very pro

Raegan says that the reactions of the families he works with are the most rewarding of his work.

She shared a story about how they played a dance song by David Guetta and Usher at the funeral of an older woman.

& # 39;He had a gentleman in his 80s who wanted a dance song for his wife's funeral, "he said." He told us he wanted a song called Without You, so I played David Guetta and Usher for him, since it was the only one I could think of. It was just what he wanted.

"If you listen to the lyrics," I'm lost, I'm vain, I'll never be the same without you ", it's absolutely appropriate.

"I did not expect it, but it was heartbreaking to know that this man could relate so well to what is usually a dance song."

Raegan says that his friends and family are very supportive of his career and are very proud of what he does. However, she admits that it is difficult to organize the funerals of people she knows and is close to

Raegan says that his friends and family are very supportive of his career and are very proud of what he does. However, she admits that it is difficult to organize the funerals of people she knows and is close to

Raegan says that his friends and family are very supportive of his career and are very proud of what he does. However, she admits that it is difficult to organize the funerals of people she knows and is close to

Raegan admitted that most people are surprised when he tells them what their job is.

"My least favorite reaction is when people say," Well, someone has to do it, I guess. "I always find it offensive because what we do is an honor," he said.

"It's an honor to be able to do the last thing you can possibly do for someone once they die and an honor to serve a family when they need it."

She added: "The most common question they ask me is: & # 39; & # 39; Are not you afraid? & & # 39 ;. & # 39 ;. I have no idea what people expect me to be afraid.

"Anyone I've been in a relationship with before knows what I do for a living, it's not something I tend to go into in detail about people, I'm a funeral director and that's all they need to know.

Raegan admits that people are surprised when he tells them what he does as a career. She says that it bothers her when people say "good someone has to do it", since she believes that organizing funerals should be considered an honor. Here, she is photographed in Palm Springs, California while attending the Coachella party

Raegan admits that people are surprised when he tells them what he does as a career. She says that it bothers her when people say "good someone has to do it", since she believes that organizing funerals should be considered an honor. Here, she is photographed in Palm Springs, California while attending the Coachella party

Raegan admits that people are surprised when he tells them what he does as a career. She says that it bothers her when people say "good someone has to do it", since she believes that organizing funerals should be considered an honor. Here, she is photographed in Palm Springs, California while attending the Coachella party

Raegan paid tribute to his friends and family and said they are proud of what he does. However, he admits that it is difficult to organize funerals for people he knows.

She said: & # 39; My family and my friends are very supportive. Everyone is very proud of the role I play. My friends love to introduce me & # 39; & # 39; Guess what your job is & # 39; & # 39 ;, no one has yet achieved it.

"Unfortunately, I had to organize and hold funerals within my own circle of family and friends, and at this time those closest to me get to see more deeply what I do.

"They still can not believe the work I do, but it is in these difficult times that they are most proud."

Raegan, pictured in Grange Cemetery, says the most common question asked is whether her job scares her. She says that the question always confuses her, since she does not understand what is to be feared

Raegan, pictured in Grange Cemetery, says the most common question asked is whether her job scares her. She says that the question always confuses her, since she does not understand what is to be feared

Raegan, pictured in Grange Cemetery, says the most common question asked is whether her job scares her. She says that the question always confuses her, since she does not understand what is to be feared

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