The NSW government collected $ 6.1 million in fines after mobile speed camera warning signs were removed

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Drivers forced to pay $ 6.1 million in fines in a MONTH thanks to ‘unfair’ new speed rule

  • Warning signs warning drivers about mobile speed cameras have been removed in NSW
  • New figures show that $ 6.1 million in speeding fines were collected in February alone
  • That compares to $ 5.7 million in fine revenue over the entire fiscal year

Drivers have put more than $ 6 million in just a month after warning signs warning drivers on mobile speed cameras were removed from NSW.

Figures from the NSW Department of Revenue show that fast-moving drivers imposed more fines in February than in the entire past fiscal year.

The government collected record revenue of $ 6.1 million in February, compared to $ 5,743,994 in 2019-2020.

The number of speed camera fines issued in February is 15 times higher than in the comparable month last year – from 1,859 fines a year ago to 27,985 this year.

The NSW government collected a record $ 6.1 million in speeding fines in February for removing mobile speed camera warning signs.  Pictured, a warning sign that has since been removed

The NSW government collected a record $ 6.1 million in speeding fines in February for removing mobile speed camera warning signs. Pictured, a warning sign that has since been removed

Labor spokesman John Graham said the fines are expected to continue to rise as the NSW government enacts an increase in the number of hours that mobile speed cameras work.

That will increase from 7,000 hours to 21,000 hours every month from July.

“This is a sales record,” Graham said Monday.

“We support these cameras, but we would like to see warning signs and some of this money should immediately flow back to driver training,” he said.

NRMA spokesperson Peter Khoury said the startling numbers are “what we feared would happen,” adding members had told the organization they were regularly confused about what the speed limit was due to a lack of signage.

“Those warning signs not only warned the driver, they also told people what the speed limits were,” he told The Daily Telegraph.

The $ 6.1 million in fine revenue collected in February was more than the $ 5.7 million collected by the NSW government for the entire past fiscal year.  Pictured: Motorists in Sydney

The $ 6.1 million in fine revenue collected in February was more than the $ 5.7 million collected by the NSW government for the entire past fiscal year.  Pictured: Motorists in Sydney

The $ 6.1 million in fine revenue collected in February was more than the $ 5.7 million collected by the NSW government for the entire past fiscal year. Pictured: Motorists in Sydney

But Road Secretary Andrew Constance defended getting rid of the signs, saying research showed that removing them would reduce speed and prevent at least 43 deaths a year.

He said the best way to avoid a postal fine was to stick to the speed limit.

“ The reality is, if you stick to the speed limit, you don’t have to pay, and if you stick to the speed limit, you’re less likely to kill someone, ” he said.

Mr. Constance announced a review of speed camera enforcement in November last year, including the removal of warning signs, a reduction in the high visibility of vehicles and increased enforcement hours.

Before they were removed, ‘your speed is checked’ warning signs were posted 250 meters before and 50 meters after each mobile speed camera.

Transport for NSW Deputy Secretary for Safety, Environment and Regulation, Tara McCarthy, said the revenue from speeding fines is being fed back into road safety measures, such as safety barriers.

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