The Norwegian Royal Family dons traditional clothing to celebrate the Constitutional Day

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The Norwegian Royal Family don traditional dress and proudly wave flags from the balcony of the Oslo Palace as they celebrate the country’s national holiday

  • King Harald V was joined today by his wife Queen Sonja, son and grandchildren
  • Women donned traditional clothes, while men looked smart in suits and top hats
  • Annual public holiday is always celebrated on May 17, where Norwegians celebrate the signing of the constitution declaring Norway an independent kingdom in 1814

The Norwegian king and his family wore traditional clothing as they proudly waved flags from the balcony of Oslo’s Palace in Oslo today.

King Harald V, 84, was accompanied by his wife Queen Sonja, his son Crown Prince Haakon, his daughter-in-law Crown Princess Mette-Marit and their children Princess Ingrid Alexandra and Prince Sverre Magnus as they celebrated Constitution Day.

While the men in the family marked the occasion by donning black top hats and suits, the women opted for traditional Scandinavian clothing.

At first glance, the joyful snaps may seem to show that the festivities are in full swing, but they were scaled back from previous years due to social distance measures that remain in effect amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The Norwegian king and his family wore traditional clothes while waving flags today from the balcony of Oslo in Oslo. In the photo, King Harald, right, Queen Sonja, second right Crown Prince Haakon, third left, Crown Princess Mette-Marit, and their children Princess Ingrid Alexandra, left and Prince Sverre Magnus

The snaps appear to show the festivities in full swing, but they were scaled back from previous years due to social distance measures that remain in effect amid the coronavirus pandemic.  Depicted, parties in front of the palace

The snaps appear to show the festivities in full swing, but they were scaled back from previous years due to social distance measures that remain in effect amid the coronavirus pandemic. Depicted, parties in front of the palace

In previous years, both Sverre and his father wore traditional Norwegian costume, known as bunads, which consist of white shirts, knee socks and red splashes.

But last year and today, the Prince and King opted for smart suits and showed their national pride by proudly standing on a balcony adored with the flags of their country.

Crown Princess Mette-Marit, who wore her blonde hair down, is known for her quintessentially classic style, so her long white skirt and apron were quite a departure from her usual look.

King Harald V and Queen Sonja both revealed they were vaccinated with the Covid-19 shot in January, with a brief statement from the Royal Court that read: ‘His Majesty the King and Her Majesty the Queen have been vaccinated against the coronavirus today.

“The royal couple will get the next vaccine in three weeks.”

In total, Norway has seen 58,651 cases and reported 517 deaths from Covid-19 since the start of the pandemic.

While the men in the family marked the occasion by donning smart black top hats and suits, the women opted for traditional Scandinavian attire (pictured)

While the men in the family marked the occasion by donning smart black top hats and suits, the women opted for traditional Scandinavian attire (pictured)

The annual holiday is always celebrated on May 17, where Norwegians celebrate the signing of the constitution that declared Norway an independent kingdom in 1814.

The national celebrations see parades across the country, stopping at the royal palace to greet the crowds.

The constitution declared Norway an independent kingdom in an effort to prevent it from being ceded to Sweden after the devastating defeat of Denmark and Norway in the Napoleonic Wars.

During the 1820s, King Karl Johan banned the celebration of the event for several years, believing it to be some kind of protest and disdain – even rebellion – against the union between Norway and Sweden.

His attitude changed after the Battle of the Square in 1829, causing such a commotion that the king had to allow commemorations on that day.

Four years later, in 1833, the first official celebration took place near the monument to former minister Christian Krohg, who had spent much of his political life restraining the monarch’s personal power.

After 1864, the day became more established when the first children’s parade was launched in Christiania, which initially consisted of boys only. In 1899 girls were allowed to participate and they have since.

In 1905 the union with Sweden was dissolved and Prince Carl of Denmark was elected king of an independent Norway under the name Haakon VII.

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