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The New York Times is calling for troops to destroy the George Floyd riots

The New York Times has agreed to an opinion calling for troops to be sent to destroy the riots associated with George Floyd’s protests in recent days.

The newspaper yesterday posted a mea culpa about her decision to publish Senator Tom Cotton’s inflammatory and “fascist” opinion calling for the use of military force against protesters. A mea culpa is a Latin term used to accept one’s responsibility or guilt.

Eileen Murphy, a Times spokeswoman, said, “We examined the piece and the trial prior to publication.”

“This review made it clear that a quick editorial process led to the publication of an opinion that did not meet our standards,” added Murphy.

“As a result, we plan to investigate both short-term and long-term changes, including expanding our fact-check operation and reducing the number of opinion pieces we publish.”

Republican Senator from Arkansas, Tom Cotton, wrote an opinion published Wednesday calling for the “ overwhelming show of violence to spread, detain and ultimately deter terrorists ” against the various protests held in the United States originated after the deaths of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor.

Cotton claimed that the Resurrection Act empowers the President to “deploy the military” or some other means “in cases of rebellion or obstruction of the law.”

In the days following the publication, writers and contributors expressed their grievances over the decision to publish on Twitter.

The Republican Arkansas Senator responded to his opinion on Wednesday calling for the “overwhelming show of violence to spread, detain, and ultimately deter criminal offenders”

Publisher of the New York Times and chairman of the New York Times Company Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. Attenda conference on July 21, 2015 in New York City

Publisher of the New York Times and chairman of the New York Times Company Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. Attenda conference on July 21, 2015 in New York City

James Bennet, editor in chief at the New York Times, speaks at the Aspen Ideas Festival on Tuesday, July 1, 2014

James Bennet, editor in chief at the New York Times, speaks at the Aspen Ideas Festival on Tuesday, July 1, 2014

The article was initially defended by publisher AG Sulzberger (left), who said the newspaper wanted to share ‘views from across the spectrum’. The page editor of the newspaper James Bennet (right) also defended the decision to publish. “To me, it’s much more likely that society will give the right answers instead of discussing them openly, rather than leaving them uncontested,” he said.

Pulitzer Prize winner Nikole Hannah-Jones tweeted that “as a black woman, as a journalist, I’m deeply ashamed that we led this.”

More than a dozen journalists reported sick the day after the play was published, The Guardian reported.

The article was initially defended by publisher AG Sulzberger who said the newspaper wanted to share ‘views from across the spectrum’.

The newspaper’s page editor, James Bennet, also defended the decision to publish.

“To me, it’s much more likely that society will give the right answers instead of discussing them openly, rather than leaving them uncontroversial,” he said.

Tom Cotton's opinion was taken down on Twitter by the New York Times community and many readers stated that they intended to stop reading the publication at all

Tom Cotton's opinion was taken down on Twitter by the New York Times community and many readers stated that they intended to stop reading the publication at all

Tom Cotton’s opinion was taken down on Twitter by the New York Times community and many readers stated that they intended to stop reading the publication at all

Op-ed contributor and author Roxane Gay stated that the New York Times' op-ed but black staff is in danger.

Op-ed contributor and author Roxane Gay stated that the New York Times' op-ed but black staff is in danger.

Op-ed contributor and author Roxane Gay stated that the New York Times’ op-ed but black staff is in danger.

“Throughout history, presidents have exercised this authority dozens of times to protect law-abiding citizens from disorder,” Cotton claimed.

“Nor is it inconsistent with the Posse Comitatus Act, which limits the military’s role in law enforcement, but expressly excludes statutes such as the Insurrection Act.”

Cotton’s opinion was taken down on Twitter by the New York Times community, and many readers stated that they intended to stop reading the publication at all.

Op-ed contributor and author Roxane Gay stated that the New York Times’ op-ed but black staff is in danger.

Gay continued, “As an NYT writer, I am absolutely against the editorial staff of Tom Cotton.” We are well served by a robust and ideologically diverse public discourse that includes radical, liberal and conservative voices.

“This is not. His play was inflammatory and endorsed the military occupation as if the constitution does not exist. ‘

Many pointed out that the opinion was cast on the 31st anniversary of the Tiananmen Square protests in 1989, when Chinese troops murdered thousands of young protesters who they said had “rebelled.”

“The decision to publish @SenTomCotton calling for the deployment of troops to quell the turmoil falls short in journalistic practice,” said Sewell Chan, former editor of NYT.

Gay continued, “As an NYT writer, I am absolutely against the editorial staff of Tom Cotton.” We are well served by a robust and ideologically diverse public discourse that includes radical, liberal and conservative voices

“This is not. His play was inflammatory and endorsed the military occupation as if the constitution does not exist ‘

Many pointed out that the opinion was cast on the 31st anniversary of the Tiananmen Square protests in 1989, when Chinese troops killed protesters

Many pointed out that the opinion was cast on the 31st anniversary of the Tiananmen Square protests in 1989, when Chinese troops killed protesters

Many pointed out that the opinion was cast on the 31st anniversary of the Tiananmen Square protests in 1989, when Chinese troops killed protesters

It calls for “an overwhelming display of power to disperse, detain and ultimately deter lawbreakers,” but does not provide evidence that existing law enforcement efforts – by National Guard forces, sheriffs, city police – fail, “Chan continued.

As @EsperDoD said today, ‘The ability to use active duty officers in a law enforcement role should only be used as a last resort – and only in the most urgent and nasty situations. We are not in any of those situations now. I do not support invoking the Insurrection Act. ”

Chan said the NYT has published controversial and provocative perspectives in the past – and especially during his time as an editor. But he claimed that Cotton’s piece was not “original” or “current.”

“The decision to publish @SenTomCotton calling for the deployment of troops to quell the turmoil falls short in journalistic practice,” said Sewell Chan, former editor of NYT

“It may have been 2 days, but Pentagon, @EsperDoD and Mattis have clearly pushed back,” he added. “The governors have not asked for military deployment – in fact, several Trump have told Trump that it would make matters much worse.”

#TruthMatters, and I will always read @nytimes. But the richest, largest and most powerful newspaper in America must exercise discretion and caution when using its platform. This was far short. ‘

Brian Schatz, a Senator from Hawaii, said he sent numerous “non-fascist opinion pieces to the Times,” calling Cotton’s piece “sour grapes.”

He said he had done one in the area of ​​climate, one for medicaid and one for a debt-free university.

Others rebuked Times’s leadership for doing the play at all.

Hawaii senator Brian Schatz said he had sent numerous “non-fascist opinion pieces to the Times,” calling Cotton’s piece “sour grapes”

You think Cotton uses the Times’s neutered both-sidesism to call for domestic slaughter, but in fact, the Times’ ownership and leadership uses Tom Cotton to express their own desire and plea for domestic slaughter in the name of order launder and return to Cipriani, ‘says author Jacob Bacharach.

A.G. Sulzberger, publisher of the New York Times, sent a letter to the company saying that while he was behind the play’s publication, he was listening to black employees of the company.

“Obviously, many thought this piece was beyond acceptability and was dangerous commentary about an explosive moment that should not have been found in The Times,” he said. ‘Even as a counterpart to our own institutional vision.

He added, “It is essential that we listen to and reflect on the concerns we hear, as we would with any piece that gets a lot of criticism. I do that with an open mind. ‘

“Our journalistic mission – seeking the truth and helping people understand the world – can’t be more important than this moment of turmoil.”

A.G. Sulzberger, publisher of the New York Times, sent a letter to the company saying that while he was behind the publication of the play, he was listening to black employees of the company.

A.G. Sulzberger, publisher of the New York Times, sent a letter to the company saying that while he was behind the publication of the play, he was listening to black employees of the company.

A.G. Sulzberger, publisher of the New York Times, sent a letter to the company saying that while he was behind the publication of the play, he was listening to black employees of the company.

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