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Steakhouse Peter Luger, shown from the Williamsburg Bridge exit, received a damaging zero-star rating in The New York Times on Tuesday

Peter Luger, the famous Brooklyn steakhouse, often called the best in New York City, has been evacuated by The New York Times with a excoriating, zero star review it shouts what many guests have whispered for a long time: it's over its best.

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The Times food critic, Pete Wells, described the restaurant as an expensive & # 39; scam & # 39; where customers are treated roughly by staff and & # 39; processed & # 39; at the front door.

He destroyed the food, which he said was unevenly cooked and underwhelming, and threw the restaurant managers who take everything out of the cupboard to make things uncomfortable.

New Yorkers rejoiced in his criticism and went to Twitter in large numbers to say that they had long felt the same about the restaurant.

Many called the review & # 39; past due & # 39; and rattled the names of other notable places such as 4 Charles Prime Rib and Keens who they thought were superior.

Steakhouse Peter Luger, shown from the Williamsburg Bridge exit, received a damaging zero-star rating in The New York Times on Tuesday

Steakhouse Peter Luger, shown from the Williamsburg Bridge exit, received a damaging zero-star rating in The New York Times on Tuesday

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The New York Times review on Tuesday that gave the restaurant zero stars

The New York Times review on Tuesday that gave the restaurant zero stars

The New York Times review on Tuesday that gave the restaurant zero stars

Employees of Peter Luger, who are said to be difficult to get hold of because of their long-standing but recently abolished no online reservation policy, could not be reached. There was no response on Tuesday to the Brooklyn restaurant's headphone line.

The restaurant is located under the Williamsburg Bridge and has attracted wealthy Manhattan steaks for decades.

It opened in 1887, when it was known as Carl Lugers Café, Billiards and Bowling Alley.

The Ministry of Motor Vehicles is a block party compared to the line at Peter Luger

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Owner Peter Luger owned the restaurant, but it was named after his cousin, Carl.

It was taken over in 1920 by Sol Fortman, a local businessman and over the years grew into one of the best steakhouses in the five boroughs.

The restaurant has a Michelin star and no doubt has a line of diners, even those who have reservations, at the door every day.

But, Wells writes, it has lost its charm and is no longer worth its exorbitant prizes.

For example, steak for two is $ 109. A side dish of sliced ​​tomatoes and onions is $ 16.95 and the famous thick bacon is $ 6.95 each.

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& # 39; I no longer know when the doubts started, but they have grown over time & # 39 ;, he writes and explains that he has been in the restaurant since the 1990s, once a year like to go out for a life-changing steak.

The menu at Peter Luger where steak for two costs $ 109 and a side of raw, sliced ​​tomato and onion is $ 16.95

The menu at Peter Luger where steak for two costs $ 109 and a side of raw, sliced ​​tomato and onion is $ 16.95

The menu at Peter Luger where steak for two costs $ 109 and a side of raw, sliced ​​tomato and onion is $ 16.95

The facade of the restaurant. There is almost always a rule inside, even for those who have a reservation

The facade of the restaurant. There is almost always a rule inside, even for those who have a reservation

The facade of the restaurant. There is almost always a rule inside, even for those who have a reservation

The restaurant is best known for its porterhouse steak. But Wells described it as unevenly cooked and far from the best piece of meat in New York City
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The restaurant is best known for its porterhouse steak. But Wells described it as unevenly cooked and far from the best piece of meat in New York City

The restaurant is best known for its porterhouse steak. But Wells described it as unevenly cooked and far from the best piece of meat in New York City

Peter Luger & # 39; s famous side of bacon, which is $ 6.95 each

Peter Luger & # 39; s famous side of bacon, which is $ 6.95 each

Peter Luger & # 39; s famous side of bacon, which is $ 6.95 each

& # 39; Diners who walk through the door and literally want to hand over stacks of money are not greeted; they are processed …

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& # 39; There is almost always a wait, with or without a reservation, and there is almost always a long line of supplications against the wall.

New York Times food critic Pete Wells

New York Times food critic Pete Wells

New York Times food critic Pete Wells

& # 39; A friendly word or a reassuring smile from someone in the staff would pass the time. The smile never comes.

& # 39; The Ministry of Motor Vehicles is a blockparty compared to the line at Peter Luger & # 39 ;, he writes.

The problems also don't end up on the line, according to Wells, who also says that the once & # 39; charmingly brusque & # 39; waiters are now just rude and disconnected.

& # 39; The waiters, who were once charmingly brusque, now give the strong impression that this endless demand for food and drink is everything in between and a well-deserved nap, & # 39; he wrote.

Wells also said the food was substandard.

& # 39; The shrimp cocktail has always tasted like cold latex dipped in ketchup and horseradish … Was the Caesar salad always so drippy, the croutons always straight out of a bag, the grated cheese always so white and rubbery? & # 39;

The meat, he said, was also nothing to write home about.

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New Yorkers welcomed Wells' devastating criticism of the restaurant

New Yorkers welcomed Wells' devastating criticism of the restaurant

New Yorkers welcomed Wells' devastating criticism of the restaurant

& # 39; What worries me every time I eat a Luger porterhouse is the realization that it's just a steak and far from the best that New York has to offer, "he wrote.

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New Yorkers and tourists who have eaten in the restaurant welcomed Wells & # 39; criticism of Twitter.

Some said they had long had the same opinion that it was too expensive and overrated, but that it had once been worth the hype.

Others said they experienced the poor service and the mediocre food Wells & # 39; experienced in the 1980s and 1990s.

They mentioned their other favorites, 4 Charles Prime Rib, Keens, The Beatrice Inn, while some said the steaks they eat in Nebraska were preferred for $ 20.

Peter Luger, who is still owned by the Forman family, did not address the bad review.

It remains on the Michelin star list.

.