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The New South Wales police were instructed to focus on children who were “possibly” indigenous

Revealed: Police were ordered to target CHILDREN who were “possibly” native – as officers searched more than 200,000 strips

  • Children who were ‘possibly’ native to the New South Wales police
  • The Suspect Targeting Management Plan was intended to tackle repeat offenders
  • Some children – between 9 and 17 years old – had never been charged before
  • Commission law enforcement behavior has raised concerns about the regime

Children who were ‘possibly’ indigenous were attacked by the police according to a plan in which they conducted random comic investigations.

The ‘Suspect Targeting Management Plan’ was intended to tackle repeat offenders with the aim of reducing crime.

According to the plan, children – between nine and 17 years old – who were targeted by the police in New South Wales were predominantly Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander and a handful of them had no previous charges before being placed on the list.

Those children had come to the attention of the police because they had fallen victim to domestic violence or children at risk, according to a report from the Law Enforcement Conduct Commission.

NSW Police carried out more than 200,000 searches in the 2019 financial year (stock image)

Children who were ‘possibly’ indigenous were attacked by the police in a regime that searched them for more than 200,000 strips

After being placed on the police waiting list, those children were subsequently charged with multiple offenses.

A nine-year-old Aboriginal child without previous charges was charged 94 times after being attacked by the police.

A 12-year-old Aboriginal girl without charge before the target was charged 14 times.

The LECC report showed that 70 percent of the children had stop and search actions, which is considered a risk because the police need a reasonable suspicion to perform a search.

Of the 429 children who were targeted by the police, 72 percent were identified as “possibly Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander.”

However, the police claim that the figure is exaggerated and believed that only about 47 percent were Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander.

The LECC study showed that there were ‘targeting patterns that seem to have led to unreasonable, unjust and oppressive interactions for young STMP targets’.

After the assessment, the LECC considered it ‘not suitable for the purpose’.

The police plan to redesign the system, contacting liaison officers from the Aboriginal community and liaison officers for young people.

Screens set up at Sydney Central Station during rush hour in March 2019 to allow police to search for comics on commuters. NSW Police says that officers must have a 'reasonable suspicion' to perform a search

Screens set up at Sydney Central Station during rush hour in March 2019 to allow police to search for comics on commuters. NSW Police says that officers must have a 'reasonable suspicion' to perform a search

Screens set up at Sydney Central Station during rush hour in March 2019 to allow police to search for comics on commuters. NSW Police says that officers must have a ‘reasonable suspicion’ to perform a search

The report comes after the police revealed 238,923 searches in 2019, which was 2,709 searches outside their quota for the 2019 financial year of 241,632 searches.

NSW Police said officers must have ‘reasonable suspicion’ to perform a search.

“Every time a police officer performs his search powers, he must have a reasonable suspicion as LEPRA requires,” they said in a statement.

“A search cannot be performed if these criteria are not met.”

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