The Nevada professor throws himself to protest against President Trump

Mark J. Bird, a sociology professor at the College of Southern Nevada, shot himself in the K building of the Charleston campus (pictured) last month

An anti-Trump sociology professor at the College of Southern Nevada shot himself on campus last month as a way to protest against the president, police said.

Mark J. Bird, 69, was found bloodied outside a bathroom in the K building on the Charleston campus with a self-inflicted bullet wound the morning of the second day of school on August 28.

Inside the bathroom, there was the .22 caliber gun he used, as well as a worn casing shell.

Bird also left a $ 100 bill stuck to the bathroom mirror with a note that said, "For the concierge," according to the Review Journal.

He was treated for his wound and later charged with possessing a dangerous weapon on school property, unloading a gun inside a forbidden structure and carrying a concealed weapon without a permit.

Mark J. Bird, a sociology professor at the College of Southern Nevada, shot himself in the K building of the Charleston campus (pictured) last month

Mark J. Bird, a sociology professor at the College of Southern Nevada, shot himself in the K building of the Charleston campus (pictured) last month

Bird was found with a self-inflicted wound on his arm. He said he shot himself to protest against the president

Bird was found with a self-inflicted wound on his arm. He said he shot himself to protest against the president

Bird was found with a self-inflicted wound on his arm. He said he shot himself to protest against the president

The professor said he shot himself in the arm to rebel against Donald Trump's presidency, the police report said, without going into more details.

An alert about the incident was sent to all students and teachers around 9 in the morning.

The president of CSN, Federico Zaragoza, wrote in a newsletter: "I appreciate all the expressions of concern and interest, and I promise to keep everyone updated if the situation changes."

Bird, for whatever reason, was not identified in the newsletter.

Robert Manis, president of the CSN teachers' association, told the Review Journal: "They never told the students much, except that it was resolved on the day of the shooting.

"When you do not give all the details, the rumors go crazy." It's unfortunate because it made the students and teachers very afraid and allowed the rumors to proliferate. "

Bird will appear at his initial court hearing on September 17.

He is currently employed as a member of the emeritus faculty at the community university.

The president of CSN Federico Zaragoza (in the photo) sent a newsletter to students and teachers about the incident

The president of CSN Federico Zaragoza (in the photo) sent a newsletter to students and teachers about the incident

The president of CSN Federico Zaragoza (in the photo) sent a newsletter to students and teachers about the incident

Robert Manis, president of the CSN teachers' union (pictured), told the Review Journal: "They never told the students much about that."

Robert Manis, president of the CSN teachers' union (pictured), told the Review Journal: "They never told the students much about that."

Robert Manis, president of the CSN teachers' union (pictured), told the Review Journal: "They never told the students much about that."

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