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The mystery surrounding BMW with a ‘COVID-19’ number plate is FINALLY solved

Mystery surrounding BMW with a ‘COVID-19’ license plate is finally solved five months after it was abandoned at a major airport

  • Gray BMW sedan with COVID-19 number plates was left at Adelaide Airport
  • Employee Steven Spry said the car has been at the airport since ‘February or earlier’
  • Airport staff have since contacted the owner who is off the highway

The mystery behind a BMW with COVID-19 number plates that has been abandoned at a major airport for five months has been solved.

The 5-series gray sedan was first spotted at Adelaide Airport in February, before the coronavirus outbreak was declared a global pandemic.

But after the unusual plates made headlines this week, airport staff were contacted by the car owner this week, who confirmed they were off the highway.

A BMW with COVID-19 number plates was left at the beginning of the pandemic by the owner who lives on the highway.

A BMW with COVID-19 number plates was left at the beginning of the pandemic by the owner who lives on the highway

The gray sedan was noticed by Steven Spry, an Adelaide Airport employee, who believed the car had been parked there since ‘February or even earlier’.

Spy said the airport staff noticed the car a few months earlier, but it wasn’t until the cover broke in April that they saw the license plates.

They had speculated that it was from a long-range pilot who went overseas and was unable to return.

In the meantime, new images have emerged of the car driving along Burbridge Road and West Beach on March 24.

In the meantime, new images have emerged of the car driving along Burbridge Road and West Beach on March 24

In the meantime, new images have emerged of the car driving along Burbridge Road and West Beach on March 24

In the meantime, new images have emerged of the car driving along Burbridge Road and West Beach on March 24

Driver Dan Parfitt made the video to post on social media after noticing the unusual license plates.

“It immediately caught my eye … I made it into a Snapchat video and never thought about it again,” Parfitt said. ABC news.

“It was quite early in the procedure before it really started here.”

The name COVID-19 was not used until February 11, after it was designated a new coronavirus before the pandemic was declared.

It can take up to ten days for personalized license plates to arrive in South Australia.

Motorists have also approved registration for a Toyota Corona with the license plate ‘virus’, and a Holden ute with the license plate ‘Wuhan’.

The gray sedan was noticed by Adelaide Airport employee Steven Spry, who believed the car was parked there since 'February or even earlier'

The gray sedan was noticed by Adelaide Airport employee Steven Spry, who believed the car was parked there since 'February or even earlier'

The gray sedan was noticed by Adelaide Airport employee Steven Spry, who believed the car was parked there since ‘February or even earlier’

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