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The mystery of strangers & # 39; ice rings & # 39; has been solved in the oldest lake in the world.

The mystery of strangers & # 39; ice rings & # 39; in the oldest lake in the world that has baffled scientists for decades it has been solved using satellite data and sensors

  • Ice rings have formed on Lake Baikal since 1969 and now experts know why
  • The researchers drilled 700 feet in the ice and measured the water temperature
  • The water in the eddies was 2 to 4 degrees warmer than the surrounding water.
  • The currents are stronger at the edges that melt the ice in a circular fashion.

The strangers & # 39; ice rings & # 39; in one of the oldest and deepest lakes in the world they have left scientists baffled for decades, until now.

Using data and satellite sensors, experts have determined that the impressive formations on Lake Baikal in Siberia are the result of warm whirlpools or warm water flowing clockwise.

The eddy currents are stronger around the edges, which allows the ice to melt, but they are weaker in the center, which makes the area remain frozen.

Researchers are still investigating the cause of the warm water swirl, but the data suggests that they were probably formed from wind patterns and the influx of water from other rivers.

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Using data and satellite sensors, experts have determined that the impressive formations on Lake Baikal in Siberia are the result of warm whirlpools, or warm water that flows clockwise

Using data and satellite sensors, experts have determined that the impressive formations on Lake Baikal in Siberia are the result of warm whirlpools, or warm water that flows clockwise

Alexei Kouraev, a hydrologist at the University of Toulouse, said in a statement from NASA: "The results of our field studies show that … there are warm whirlpools that circulate clockwise under the ice sheet."

"In the center of whirlpools, the ice does not melt, even though the water is warm, because the currents are weak."

& # 39; But at the edge of the whirlpool, the currents are stronger and warmer water leads to rapid melting.

Corporal Nizhneye Izgolovye, where the image was taken, is one of the most common places for ice rings to be produced.

Of the 57 rings detected in Baikal, about 13 were formed in this area.

Corporal Nizhneye Izgolovye, where the image was taken, is one of the most common places for ice rings to be produced. Of the 57 rings detected in Baikal, about 13 were formed in this area.

Corporal Nizhneye Izgolovye, where the image was taken, is one of the most common places for ice rings to be produced. Of the 57 rings detected in Baikal, about 13 were formed in this area.

Corporal Nizhneye Izgolovye, where the image was taken, is one of the most common places for ice rings to be produced. Of the 57 rings detected in Baikal, about 13 were formed in this area.

According to Kouraev, this is a privileged area because an underwater cannon tends to & # 39; catch & # 39; swirls in this area.

"People often drive a direct line between Cape Nizhneye Izgolovye and Cape Khoboy," he said, "but we strongly recommend that they take a route further south to avoid frequent ice rings in this dangerous region."

During the study, Kouraev and his team took the water temperature near the ice rings using a range of sensors at a depth of 700 feet.

They discovered that the water in the eddies was two to four degrees Fahrenheit hotter than the surrounding water.

Most ice rings appeared in March or April, but may appear as early as January or as late as May. The average ring has a diameter of approximately three to four miles, which is too large to be seen on the ground, so the team decided to check them from space

Most ice rings appeared in March or April, but may appear as early as January or as late as May. The average ring has a diameter of approximately three to four miles, which is too large to be seen on the ground, so the team decided to check them from space

Most ice rings appeared in March or April, but may appear as early as January or as late as May. The average ring has a diameter of approximately three to four miles, which is too large to be seen on the ground, so the team decided to check them from space

The team also discovered that the swirls are shaped like a lens, something found in the oceans and rarely in the lakes.

Most ice rings appeared in March or April, but may appear as early as January or as late as May.

The average ring has a diameter of approximately three to four miles, which is too large to be seen on the ground, so the team decided to check them from space.

Ice rings have formed on Lake Baikal since at least 1969, and some last only a day or a few months.

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