The mother of two reveals that she had planned her marriage and funeral after the diagnosis of ovarian cancer

A mother-of-two has revealed how she planned her funeral and her wedding the moment she ended up with ovarian cancer.

Tina Potts, 40, from Wicklow Town in Ireland, who has two children Philip, 19 – who has autism, ADHD and dyspraxia – and Elliott, 11, was destroyed when she was diagnosed with ovarian cancer in October 2017.

The heartbroken mother, who was told in January that she has a 30 percent chance of surviving until Christmas 2019, has broken the heartbreaking news her oldest son – but still needs to inform her youngest.

& # 39; I only dreamed of a mommy & # 39 ;, said Tina, who recently married her 13-year-old partner, Johnny.

& # 39; It is everything I have ever been to. That was my purpose in life, to raise my children and to have two well-behaved, well-mannered children. It is as if someone knocked me down and used everything up and ran away with it. & # 39;

Tina Potts with husband Johnny and son Elliot (left), 11, on her wedding day on Friday. The family managed to raise € 10,000 on GoFundMe for the big day

Tina Potts with husband Johnny and son Elliot (left), 11, on her wedding day on Friday. The family managed to raise € 10,000 on GoFundMe for the big day

While her local community took action to organize the wedding of her dreams, Tina was given the task of making plans for her funeral and organizing memories for her two sons to remind her of her.

& # 39; I had promised Johnny that I would marry him next year, next year, next year. And now not coming next year, & she said.

With the wedding at Narcis, both children of Tina had special roles – one acting as a ring bearer and another as the best man.

The couple raised more than € 10,000 to celebrate the marriage of their dreams and praised the astonishing support they received from their local community.

Tina and her family are now trying to make as many memories as possible, while continuing to fight ovarian cancer. Above, with her Elliott, 11 and her husband Johnny

Tina and her family are now trying to make as many memories as possible, while continuing to fight ovarian cancer. Above, with her Elliott, 11 and her husband Johnny

Tina and her family are now trying to make as many memories as possible, while continuing to fight ovarian cancer. Above, with her Elliott, 11 and her husband Johnny

& # 39; We are now trying to do as much as possible while I am physically able to miss & # 39 ;, she said. & # 39; I have organized my funeral – it is hard enough for them to deal with without it. & # 39;

For her devastating diagnosis, the two-month-old mother went to the doctor with questions about her health.

Without cancer in her family, she said the doctors are constipating her symptoms.

& # 39; I have hypothyroidism that causes fatigue, I stated the fact that it was impossible for me to lose weight & she said. & # 39; I had back pain, but I assumed it was osteoarthritis. But the whole time I had a huge tumor. & # 39;

Only when Tina was brought to A & E with severe pain, the 8 cm tumor on her ovary was discovered. Tragically, it was too late then, because she was already in the advanced stages of the disease.

The twenty-second explained that she was particularly close to the 11-year-old son Elliot and is now trying to distance himself from him so that he gets used to dealing with it without her

The twenty-second explained that she was particularly close to the 11-year-old son Elliot and is now trying to distance himself from him so that he gets used to dealing with it without her

The twenty-second explained that she was particularly close to the 11-year-old son Elliot and is now trying to distance himself from him so that he gets used to dealing with it without her

Tina with her oldest son Philip, 19 - who has autism, ADHD and dyspraxia - and Elliott, 11 and her husband Johnny (far right)

Tina with her oldest son Philip, 19 - who has autism, ADHD and dyspraxia - and Elliott, 11 and her husband Johnny (far right)

Tina with her oldest son Philip, 19 – who has autism, ADHD and dyspraxia – and Elliott, 11 and her husband Johnny (far right)

& # 39; The way the bed was somewhat questionable, & # 39; she said. & # 39; They told me I had ovarian cancer and said so casually, as if they wanted to give me a sandwich. & # 39;

She continued: & # 39; It was a huge shock – it is bad enough to be told that you have cancer, but to have no one to properly explain the ins and outs of it is double scary. & # 39 ;

Symptoms for ovarian cancer

The most common symptoms of ovarian cancer are:

  • constant bloating
  • discomfort in your abdomen or pelvic area
  • feeling full quickly with food, or loss of appetite
  • have to pee more or more often than usual

Other symptoms of ovarian cancer may include:

  • persistent indigestion or nausea
  • pain during sex
  • a change in bowel movements
  • backache
  • vaginal bleeding – especially bleeding after the menopause
  • feeling tired all the time
  • unintended weight loss

Tina received three chemotherapy treatments, before the operation to remove as much of the tumor as possible in March 2018.

But when she woke up, Tina was stunned to discover that things had not gone according to plan.

& # 39; Doctors told me it was like a washing machine there – and the cancer was everywhere, & # 39; she said.

& # 39; When I woke up, they told me they couldn't turn off the womb, turn off the spleen, they couldn't do a withdrawal on the gut. And I thought: well … where am I going from here? & # 39;

Determined to beat the disease, Tina did more exhausting chemotherapy treatments.

And after months of treatment, she was put in remission, with her & # 39; tumor marks & # 39; at 42, close to the normal 35, indicating that her cancer was declining.

But it didn't last long, because she was shocked at Christmas when she noticed that the numbers had risen to more than 1800, indicating that the cancer was back and spreading rapidly.

Doctors found that Tina was platinum resistant to normal chemotherapy and that it would no longer work.

They wanted them to have a & # 39; normal & # 39; had Christmas with her family and know that this might be her last. Doctors told her that she would receive a new chemotherapy in February.

& # 39; At that time, they said it was an endgame & # 39 ;, Tina explained. & # 39; He said: & # 39; I'm sorry but we hope to keep you as comfortable as possible during the summer and then see how long. & # 39; I was stunned. & # 39;

Heartbreaking, Tina has not disclosed the full extent of her illness to her children.

Making memories: Tina said that her family is keen to bring together as many memories as possible, and that she is completely devastated to see her sons grow up. Pictured, with Johnny

Making memories: Tina said that her family is keen to bring together as many memories as possible, and that she is completely devastated to see her sons grow up. Pictured, with Johnny

Making memories: Tina said that her family is keen to bring together as many memories as possible, and that she is completely devastated to see her sons grow up. Pictured, with Johnny

Tina had promised her 13-year-old partner (photo) that she & # 39; next year & # 39; would marry, but was devastated when she discovered in January that she might not have & # 39; next year & # 39; had wanted - and so wanted

Tina had promised her 13-year-old partner (photo) that she & # 39; next year & # 39; would marry, but was devastated when she discovered in January that she might not have & # 39; next year & # 39; had wanted - and so wanted

Tina had promised her 13-year-old partner (photo) that she & # 39; next year & # 39; would marry, but was devastated when she discovered in January that she might not have & # 39; next year & # 39; had wanted – and so wanted

& # 39; The smallest guy is only 11 so we told him they can't make me, & # 39; she said. & # 39; But we didn't tell him I'm dying. He will spend his days thinking that tomorrow is next week. & # 39;

While telling her eldest son that she might die, she isn't sure if he understands because of his complex special needs – and she admits that sometimes she wakes up and cries because she realizes this is it and she dies.

& # 39; Some mornings wake up and the fear of god is in you & # 39 ;, she explained. & # 39; You are not afraid of dying, you are not afraid of the pain, you are afraid of leaving your family behind. & # 39;

The heavy mother-of-two also has birthday cards and memory boxes planned for her children with full advice, so if they have a sad day, they have something to look back on.

She even has a zodiac sign called & # 39; mammy loves you & # 39; bought with coordinates so that when her children are older, they can look at the stars and know that she is thinking of them.

Now Tina takes a distance from her 11-year-old, with whom she is very close, to enable him to cope after she has died.

& # 39; He is a real sensitive man, & # 39; she said. & # 39; So he comes to me and hugs me and I have to train him now … I make sure his father takes him away. & # 39;

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