The memorial tower of flight 93 honors the victims of September 11 in Pennsylvania

The people who attend the dedication are standing around the 93-foot tall Voices Tower on Sunday at the National Monument of Flight 93 in Shanksville, Pennsylvania

The heroism of the passengers and the crew of the airline that died assaulting the cabin of flight 93 has been commemorated with a concrete and steel tower that will sound with wind chimes for each one of them in the place where they fell to the ground.

The relatives of the 40 people killed in the terrorist kidnapping on September 11, 2001, attended the dedication ceremony of the tower on Sunday at the National Flight 93 memorial site in Shanksville, Pennsylvania.

There, they helped to play something that finally will be 40 aluminum bells hanging in what has been called the Tower of Voices, one for each of those who died.

Former Pennsylvania governor Tom Ridge, who was in charge at the time of the attacks, said the memorial will be "an eternal concert of our heroes."

The people who attend the dedication are standing around the 93-foot tall Voices Tower on Sunday at the National Monument of Flight 93 in Shanksville, Pennsylvania

The people who attend the dedication are standing around the 93-foot tall Voices Tower on Sunday at the National Monument of Flight 93 in Shanksville, Pennsylvania

The tower will contain 40 wind chimes representing the 40 people who perished in the crash of Flight 93 in the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.

The tower will contain 40 wind chimes representing the 40 people who perished in the crash of Flight 93 in the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.

The tower will contain 40 wind chimes representing the 40 people who perished in the crash of Flight 93 in the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.

The dedication came almost 17 years after passengers on the hijacked flight from New Jersey to California battled a terrorist gang.

The officers concluded that the terrorists targeted the Boeing 757 toward Washington DC, to be used as a huge weapon in the air against the White House or the Capitol building at the end of the four planned attacks.

But after the passengers and crew learned through the phones of previous air strikes at the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, they rushed into the cabin, declaring that roll & # 39; & # 39; while facing the hijackers inside the plane, forcing them to crash early.

It was the day when lives were lost so that other lives could be saved. And they became heroes in the skies of Shanksville, "said Ridge, who also served as the first secretary of the Department of Homeland Security when it was created after September 11.

The site of the accident of flight 93 is seen the day after the terrorist attacks of September 11. Heroic passengers and crew rushed into the cockpit of the plane when they realized that the hijackers were on a suicide mission.

The site of the accident of flight 93 is seen the day after the terrorist attacks of September 11. Heroic passengers and crew rushed into the cockpit of the plane when they realized that the hijackers were on a suicide mission.

The site of the accident of flight 93 is seen the day after the terrorist attacks of September 11. Heroic passengers and crew rushed into the cockpit of the plane when they realized that the hijackers were on a suicide mission.

The commemorative structure of approximately 93 feet represents the final phase of the National Flight 93 Memorial. Each carillon generates a distinctive sound, and the rows of trees surrounding the site symbolize the sound waves.

"Together their voices will resound in perpetuity, with this beautiful county of Somerset, Pennsylvania, wind," said park superintendent Stephen Clark.

The national park at the site of the accident, about two miles north of Shanksville, also includes a memorial plaza, dedicated to the tenth anniversary in 2011, and a visitor center that opened three years ago.

Like a cold, torrential rain hit the hills, the memorial architect Paul Murdoch spoke of the plan, which uses the wind to activate the bells. It is expected that the remaining bells will be installed in the coming weeks.

"These carillons respond to cries of voices that do not repeat themselves, but that are remembered in the vibrations of a monumental tower," said Murdoch.

They range from five to 10 feet in length, weigh up to 150 pounds and are tuned.

Stephen Clark (right) the Flight 93 National Monument Superintendent addresses the crowd next to tower architect Paul Murdoch (left); Calvin E. Wilson (center left) brother of First Officer LeRoy Homer; and Tom Ridge, the First Secretary of National Security of the USA. UU

Stephen Clark (right) the Flight 93 National Monument Superintendent addresses the crowd next to tower architect Paul Murdoch (left); Calvin E. Wilson (center left) brother of First Officer LeRoy Homer; and Tom Ridge, the First Secretary of National Security of the USA. UU

Stephen Clark (right) the Flight 93 National Monument Superintendent addresses the crowd next to tower architect Paul Murdoch (left); Calvin E. Wilson (center left) brother of First Officer LeRoy Homer; and Tom Ridge, the First Secretary of National Security of the USA. UU

The Tower of Voices is above visitors, dignitaries and relatives of the victims of flight 93 at the National Flight 93 Memorial on Sunday

The Tower of Voices is above visitors, dignitaries and relatives of the victims of flight 93 at the National Flight 93 Memorial on Sunday

The Tower of Voices is above visitors, dignitaries and relatives of the victims of flight 93 at the National Flight 93 Memorial on Sunday

About 3,000 people died in the September 11 attacks, when the terrorists took control of four planes.

"These guys are the real heroes," said retired truck driver Stefan Robbins, who visited the memorial from Lexington, Kentucky. "They did not register, they're not policemen, they're not firemen."

Thirteen passengers on flight 93 made 37 combined telephone calls during the attack, obtaining information on the other three kidnappings and accidents.

"When they discovered it, it galvanized them as a group," Clark said. "They said: & # 39; We're not going back to any airport … This is a suicide mission & # 39; & # 39;

As apparently some passengers tried to storm the cabin, the hijacker at the controls rolled the plane, trying to unbalance them, before the plane reversed and crashed at 563 miles per hour on the edge of a mine at 10.30 a.m.

The impact ignited around 100 hemlock trees. Hemlocks are used as symbols throughout the design of the monument, including the tower.

The relatives of the victims of Flight 93, Calvin Wilson and Gordon Felt Jr., join the former National Security Director, Tom Ridge (left), while pulling the cables connected to the bells

The relatives of the victims of Flight 93, Calvin Wilson and Gordon Felt Jr., join the former National Security Director, Tom Ridge (left), while pulling the cables connected to the bells

The relatives of the victims of Flight 93, Calvin Wilson and Gordon Felt Jr., join the former National Security Director, Tom Ridge (left), while pulling the cables connected to the bells

A 17-ton sandstone marks the impact site, located within a 44-acre fenced area of ​​the field where the remains of the crash landed, known as the "sacred ground."

Access to that part of the park is limited to family members of passengers and crew. Four 40-foot containers of remaining debris from the crashed plane were buried there during a private ceremony on June 21.

The monument was funded with $ 46 million from 110,000 private donors, including $ 6 million to design and build the Tower of Voices.

Volunteers are on their way to the goal of planting 150,000 plants around the 2,200-acre park. It attracted some 400,000 visitors last year.

The dedication comes two days before the anniversary of the September 11 attacks.

President Donald Trump is expected to attend the memorial service on Tuesday in Shanksville, along with Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf and Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke.

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