The medieval board game is discovered in a secret chamber under a 13th-century Russian castle

A medieval board game (pictured) has been discovered in a secret chamber hidden under a 13th-century Russian castle

A medieval board game was discovered in a secret chamber hidden under a 13th-century Russian castle.

The game, carved from an old piece of clay, is probably a Morris version of nine men, a strategy game in which players fight with small pieces known as & # 39; men & # 39;

It is believed that the game, which is similar to the ladies, has existed for centuries and was popular in the Roman Empire.

Russian archaeologists said the recently discovered board game is their "most intriguing" finding as excavations continue at Vyborg Castle.

A medieval board game (pictured) has been discovered in a secret chamber hidden under a 13th-century Russian castle

A medieval board game (pictured) has been discovered in a secret chamber hidden under a 13th-century Russian castle

WHAT IS VYBORG CASTLE?

The first records of the fortress, built on a small island in the Bay of Vyborg, date from 1293.

Located near the Russian-Finnish border, the structure has changed hands between nations several times throughout its history and is currently under Russian control.

Archaeologists were looking at the site as early as 1935.

According to the architect Otto-Iivari Meurman who was working on the site at the time, the experts saw "that a spiral staircase was coming out of the ground".

However, efforts to excavate the site were later abandoned.

Throughout the years, the site has been neglected, with many worried that the castle was falling into ruin.

However, a fund of 1,800 million rubles (more than $ 25 million / £ 19 million) has now been established to restore Vyborg Castle.

The first records of the fortress, built on a small island in the Bay of Vyborg, date from 1293.

Located near the Russian-Finnish border, the structure has changed hands between nations several times throughout its history and is currently under Russian control.

Records dating from the mid-sixteenth century mention a "secret house" with a staircase leading to the shore.

Last month, researchers discovered an underground chamber that had been hidden for centuries.

A 3D model suggests that the camera probably linked the castle to the city of Vyborg, which is at the head of Vyborg Bay.

While looking inside the camera, the archaeologists of the Vyborg museum discovered what they initially thought was a clay brick and then discovered that it was an ancient game.

It is believed that the game has been called tablei, which translates to & # 39; mill & # 39 ;.

In it, each player claims to claim the other player's men.

It is a popular game that dates back to the Roman Empire and that is sometimes also known as 'cowboy ladies'.

The researchers discovered an underground chamber last month in the 600-year-old fortress that had been hidden for centuries. In the photo is the game they found

The researchers discovered an underground chamber last month in the 600-year-old fortress that had been hidden for centuries. In the photo is the game they found

The researchers discovered an underground chamber last month in the 600-year-old fortress that had been hidden for centuries. In the photo is the game they found

Russian archaeologists said the recently discovered board game is their "most intriguing" finding as excavations continue at Vyborg Castle (pictured)

Russian archaeologists said the recently discovered board game is their "most intriguing" finding as excavations continue at Vyborg Castle (pictured)

Russian archaeologists said the recently discovered board game is their "most intriguing" finding as excavations continue at Vyborg Castle (pictured)

The game, carved from an old piece of clay, is probably a morris version of nine men, a strategy game in which players fight with small pieces known as & # 39; men & # 39; (in the image)

The game, carved from an old piece of clay, is probably a morris version of nine men, a strategy game in which players fight with small pieces known as & # 39; men & # 39; (in the image)

The game, carved from an old piece of clay, is probably a morris version of nine men, a strategy game in which players fight with small pieces known as & # 39; men & # 39; (in the image)

When a player gets a & # 39; mill & # 39 ;, which is a row of three men, he receives a piece from his opponent.

When a player is only with two men, the game ends because he can not make a "mill" anymore.

& # 39; This is perhaps the most intriguing finding at this time [at the site]", Vyborg museum reserve manager Vladimir Tsoi wrote on his Vkontakte social media page.

Located near the Russian-Finnish border, the structure has changed hands between nations several times throughout its history, although it is currently under Russian control

Located near the Russian-Finnish border, the structure has changed hands between nations several times throughout its history, although it is currently under Russian control

Located near the Russian-Finnish border, the structure has changed hands between nations several times throughout its history, although it is currently under Russian control

Records dating from the mid-sixteenth century mention a "secret house" with a staircase leading to the shore. In the photo is a tower in the castle of Vyborg

Records dating from the mid-sixteenth century mention a "secret house" with a staircase leading to the shore. In the photo is a tower in the castle of Vyborg

Records dating from the mid-sixteenth century mention a "secret house" with a staircase leading to the shore. In the photo is a tower in the castle of Vyborg

As they looked inside the camera (in the photo), the archaeologists of the Vyborg museum discovered what they initially thought was a clay brick

As they looked inside the camera (in the photo), the archaeologists of the Vyborg museum discovered what they initially thought was a clay brick

As they looked inside the camera (in the photo), the archaeologists of the Vyborg museum discovered what they initially thought was a clay brick

Archaeologists were looking at the site as early as 1935.

According to the architect Otto-Iivari Meurman who was working on the site at the time, the experts saw "that a spiral staircase was coming out of the ground".

However, efforts to excavate the site were later abandoned.

Over the years, the building has been neglected, and many were worried because the castle was falling into ruins.

However, a fund of 1,800 million rubles (more than $ 25 million / £ 19 million) has now been established to restore Vyborg Castle.

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