WhatsNew2Day
Latest News And Breaking Headlines

The Louisiana agent was fired for saying that his “unfortunate” more black people did not die from coronavirus

A Louisiana agent was fired hours after posting a Facebook comment saying it was “unfortunate” that more black people did not die from coronavirus.

Steven Aucoin, an officer of the Kaplan Police Department, commented on the live feed of a local news station from a press conference given by John Bel Edwards, the governor of Louisiana.

City chief Joshua Hardy explained how his now ex-officer reacted to the news feed managed by KLFY News.

Commenting on a commentator who claimed that the virus was 'made to kill all blacks,' Kaplan police officer wrote 'well it didn't work ... how bad'

Left: Commenting on a commentator who claimed the virus was “made to kill all blacks,” Kaplan police officer wrote “well it didn’t work … how bad.” Police chief Joshua Hardy said that upon further investigation, other comments were found by Aucoin that “were not suitable for a police officer to post on Facebook.”

The racist Facebook comments were posted under a live stream of a press conference given by John Bel Edwards Louisiana Governor

The racist Facebook comments were posted under a live stream of a press conference given by John Bel Edwards Louisiana Governor

The racist Facebook comments were posted under a live stream of a press conference given by John Bel Edwards Louisiana Governor

Aucoin responded to another commenter who wrote in broken English: “virus made to kill all BLACKS is death.”

“Well, it didn’t work,” Aucoin wrote, “too bad,” according to screenshots of his comments that have been widely shared online.

In an announcement on Facebook, Kaplan police wrote, “We are writing this to inform everyone that we have been made aware of the situation with Steven Aucoin’s comments on Facebook.

Chief Hardy had the incident investigated and the officer was fired. Chef Hardy and the Kaplan police would like to apologize for this. ‘

Chief Hardy was also interviewed by KLFY News, who broke the story after being notified of the comments under their live feed.

“We are held to a higher standard than normal citizens, so you have to watch what you do, watch what you say. You can’t just post anything you want on social media, ”Hardy said.

Joshua Brothers, a Louisiana native, also a firefighter and military veteran, told the outlet that it is possible that Aucoin’s comments could be taken out of context because of a recent Facebook update that doesn’t list all comments in chronological order .

When asked about this possibility, Chief Hardy said that when they investigated the matter, they found other comments from Aucoin that were ‘not suitable for a police officer to post on Facebook.’

To prevent this from happening again, Hardy said he informed his officers of the on-site social media policies that were updated when he arrived at the office.

Police were praised on Facebook for announcing the termination of Aucoin’s employment.

A user, who posted under the name Ang Garcia, said, “Thanks for that quick action. I hope this department and others continue to follow suit.

“I also hope that other organizational factors that encourage or allow the existence or growth of racism within the department are also addressed. It costs us all. ‘

Pictured: Kaplan Police Chief – Joshua Hardy. Hardy said that police officers are “held to a higher standard than normal citizens” and fired Steve Aucoin for his racist comments on Facebook

Kaplan police posted an update on May 15 announcing that Aucoin had been fired for comments he made on Facebook

Kaplan police posted an update on May 15 announcing that Aucoin had been fired for comments he made on Facebook

Kaplan police posted an update on May 15 announcing that Aucoin had been fired for comments he made on Facebook

The news of Aucoin’s comments and subsequent layoff is because a number of racially charged incidents involving the police have made headlines in the United States.

On May 21, two white men were arrested in Georgia on suspicion of the February murder of Ahmaud Arbery – a 25-year-old black man – who was discovered after a video was shared on social media by former police officer Gregory McMichael and son Travis which showed that the men were chasing and shooting Arbery.

The two men were arrested, and public outcry over the lack of response from local officials in February is widespread.

On Monday, May 25, a video was shared on social media with a white Minneapolis police officer who knelt on George Floyd’s neck for more than 8 minutes until he died.

The incident has sparked protests in Minneapolis and public outcry over police brutality, and the four MPD police officers involved have been fired, and further investigations are pending.

Also on Monday around 8 a.m., a white woman named Amy Cooper and her dog were on a leash in New York’s Central Park.

When a black man – Christian Cooper, who was birdwatching – asked if she could keep her dog on a leash, she called the police and said her life was threatened by an “African American man.”

Since then, she was fired Tuesday as the head of insurance solutions for insurance at Franklin Templeton, having been on administrative leave the day before.

Following opposition to Cooper’s actions, New York State Senator Felix Ortiz and Senator Brian Benjamin on Tuesday introduced new legislation that would make the false reporting of a hate crime incident illegal if it passed.

On Tuesday night, a white venture capitalist – Tom Austin – who threatened to call the police for a group of black entrepreneurs working out at a Minneapolis gym had canceled his lease.

As it turned out, the men he threatened were fellow businessmen running a business from the same building Austin worked in.

.

Comments
Loading...