The lost polar bear is now 500 MILES from its natural habitat: New footage shows the bear running south

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The lost polar bear is now 500 MILES from its natural habitat: the latest footage shows the animal continues to run south in Russia, where wildlife teams try to track it

  • The bear was last seen running down a deserted road in the Tomponsky district of Yakutia some 800 miles from its arctic home
  • Wildlife teams are tracking the bear, and residents in remote settlements have been warned to be vigilant
  • The bear was previously spotted 500 miles from its frozen home and appears to be moving further south

A lost polar bear is now 800 kilometers from its natural habitat in the Russian Arctic.

The bear was recently spotted by locals running along a deserted road in Yakutia’s Tomponsky district – Russia’s coldest region.

A video shot from a truck following the bear shows him driving through the snow on Yana Road, south to the regional capital Yakutsk.

The predator was seen before in late March, some 300 miles from the frozen ocean it calls home.

Wildlife teams have been tracking the bear – nicknamed Polar Paddington – but so far not locating it as it migrates further south.

A lost polar bear is now 800 kilometers from its natural habitat in the Russian Arctic.  The bear was recently spotted by locals running along a deserted road in Yakutia's Tomponsky district - Russia's coldest region

A lost polar bear is now 800 kilometers from its natural habitat in the Russian Arctic. The bear was recently spotted by locals running along a deserted road in Yakutia’s Tomponsky district – Russia’s coldest region

Video taken of a truck following the bear shows him driving through the snow on Yana Road, south to the regional capital Yakutsk

Video taken of a truck following the bear shows him driving through the snow on Yana Road, south to the regional capital Yakutsk

Wildlife teams have tracked the bear - nicknamed Polar Paddington - but so far have been unable to locate it as it migrates further south from its arctic habitat

Wildlife teams have tracked the bear – nicknamed Polar Paddington – but so far have been unable to locate it as it migrates further south from its arctic habitat

Although the bear performs strongly in the most recent video clip, it is at risk of food shortages, experts warn.

Yakutia’s ecology minister Afanasiev Sahamin Milanovich said two groups of specialists and state inspectors have been sent to the site of the last sighting.

Since the bear’s discovery, the animal has been monitored by local forest rangers from the State Ecological Surveillance Department of the Yakutia Department of Ecology, who noted the bear was driving south along the road.

“The bear has been repeatedly caught on camera by locals,” he added.

The bear’s behavior is highly unusual and led to an initial theory that it is an albino brown bear, rather than a polar bear.

In a video last month, the bear was spotted about 35 miles south of Batagay's administrative center

In a video last month, the bear was spotted about 35 miles south of Batagay’s administrative center

Filmed from a car, you can see the bear running through the night while people in the vehicle can hear people ask,

Filmed from a car, you can see the bear running through the night while people in the vehicle can hear people ask, “What is he doing here?”

But experts now say the images “clearly show that the animal is the polar bear.”

The ministry said the teams sent to locate the bear “have the necessary technical means to locate the animal and ensure it is protected as a rare species.”

Locals in remote Yakutia settlements have been warned to be vigilant as the bear can be dangerous.

In a video last month, the bear was spotted about 35 miles south of Batagay’s administrative center.

Filmed from a car, you can see the bear running through the night while people in the vehicle can hear people ask, “What is he doing here?”

The last time a polar bear roamed this far inland was in September 2017. A ten-month-old female cub (pictured) was rescued in the Verkhoyansk district, some 450 miles south of the Arctic coast of Siberia. [File photo]

The last time a polar bear roamed this far inland was in September 2017. A ten-month-old female cub (pictured) was rescued in the Verkhoyansk district, some 450 miles south of the Arctic coast of Siberia. [File photo]

The last time a polar bear roamed this far inland was in September 2017.

A ten-month-old female cub was rescued in the Verkhoyansk district, some 450 miles south of Siberia’s Arctic coast.

She appeared to have lost her mother and was found at a fish processing plant on the Kolyma River.

The runaway bear was caught and went first to the Moscow Zoo and then to the Nizhny Novgorod Zoo, where she has become a top attraction.

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