Advertisements
Australians are brutally attacked by catching magpies hunting in the parks and on busy roads while the mating season of the bird begins (stock image)

Revealed: the locations where roaming magpies attack Australian passersby – and why they are particularly common in one of the country's most popular parks

  • 1,000 magpie attacks have been registered by the public on a self-reporting website
  • Dozens of cases have been reported in Sydney in recent months as the mating season begins
  • Wildlife expert warned that Hyde Park in the city is a hotspot for territorial birds
  • Melbourne has also seen a wave of attacks in the Chinatown area of ​​the city
Advertisements

Australians are brutally attacked by striking magpies in parks and on busy roads while the mating season of the bird begins.

Advertisements

More than 1,000 magpie attacks were registered this year by concerned citizens on a self-reporting website – of which 125 led to injury.

In the past two months alone, dozens of diving incidents have been reported by cyclists and pedestrians in the CBD and downtown Sydney.

Scroll down for video

Australians are brutally attacked by catching magpies hunting in the parks and on busy roads while the mating season of the bird begins (stock image)

Australians are brutally attacked by catching magpies hunting in the parks and on busy roads while the mating season of the bird begins (stock image)

Concerned members of the public have registered more than 1,000 magpie attacks on a self-reporting website this year - of which 125 have resulted in injury (injury indicated by Magpie Alert! In red)
Advertisements

Concerned members of the public have registered more than 1,000 magpie attacks on a self-reporting website this year - of which 125 have resulted in injury (injury indicated by Magpie Alert! In red)

Concerned members of the public have registered more than 1,000 magpie attacks on a self-reporting website this year – of which 125 have resulted in injury (injury indicated by Magpie Alert! In red)

In the meantime, four injured people have been reported Magpie Alert! in the eastern suburbs – including Randwick, Bronte and Maroubra – since the beginning of August.

Professor of urban nature professor Darryl Jones said that Hyde Park was one of Sydney's most popular leisure centers, a hotspot for magpie attacks.

& # 39; Only a very small proportion comes to mind and most of the time these are birds in very busy locations, & # 39; he said quick script last year.

Advertisements

& # 39; They are currently trying to send a message to intruders to stay away from the nest, but people seem to be pretty fat and don't understand. & # 39;

The situation is equally dangerous for those going near magpie nests in other Australian population centers.

In Melbourne, three magpie attacks that cause injury were reported on the social website in August within a block of each other around the city's Chinatown.

City life professor Darryl Jones said that Hyde Park, one of Sydney's most popular leisure centers, was a hot spot for magpie attacks.

City life professor Darryl Jones said that Hyde Park, one of Sydney's most popular leisure centers, was a hot spot for magpie attacks.

City life professor Darryl Jones said that Hyde Park, one of Sydney's most popular leisure centers, was a hot spot for magpie attacks.

Advertisements

It comes after a mother revived earlier this month at the traumatic moment when her six-year-old son went blind in one eye after he was dived by a magpie in a park.

Finn Kelly was attacked by the bird in Clarko Reserve in Trigg, Perth from the beginning of spring in 2018.

& # 39; He came running to me with his hand over his right eye, just screaming his head off, & # 39; told his mother, Stacey, Today tonight.

& # 39; And at that moment I could only see blood coming from his nose. & # 39;

Finn Kelly (photo) was attacked by a magpie in Clarko Reserve in Trigg, Perth from the beginning of spring in 2018

Finn Kelly (photo) was attacked by a magpie in Clarko Reserve in Trigg, Perth from the beginning of spring in 2018

Advertisements

Finn Kelly (photo) was attacked by a magpie in Clarko Reserve in Trigg, Perth from the beginning of spring in 2018

Stacey remembered seeing a small sign that warned people about flying magpies when she visited the park with her children, but did not realize how serious the warning was.

& # 39; I was like: & # 39; & # 39; Okay, hey kids, keep your hat on. & # 39; & # 39; I didn't think about it anymore, & # 39; she said.

She described the case of her young son as & # 39; the worst scenario & # 39; and has urged the public to be wary of the aggressive birds.

Magpies usually dive from above during mating season – which usually lasts five weeks from early September – in the spring to protect their young.

HOW TO STAY SAFE FROM MAGNETS

Advertisements

– Pay attention to any warning signs in parks and reserves

– Familiarize yourself with alternative walking routes to avoid nesting areas

– Do not challenge the birds when they dive to protect their young

– Travel in groups if possible, because magpies usually focus on people

– Wear sunglasses, a wide-brimmed hat or an umbrella

Advertisements

– If you are riding a bicycle, jump off and walk through nesting area instead

Source: City of Sterling

But the bird that hit Finn in the eyes raised him from the ground.

Ophthalmologist at the Perth Children & # 39; s Hospital, doctor Jeffrey Lam, who treated Finn, said the severity of his injury & # 39; clearly pretty bad & # 39; used to be.

Advertisements

The Finn family has worked with the city of Sterling to design a campaign to alert the public to the danger of magpies.

Huge signs are placed at & # 39; problem locations & # 39; and urge the public to take extra care between August and November.

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) news (t) Perth