The legs, hips and buttocks of the mother of the two were devoured after a ROSEBUSH punctured her

Mother of two children Julie Broude (pictured with her daughter Camryn Rosenfeld, 12) almost died after a carnivorous insect ate her leg, hip and buttocks after she was pricked in a bush

A mother of two almost died after a meat-eating insect ate her leg, hip, and buttocks after being stabbed with a rose bush.

Julie Broude, 43, who is an enthusiastic gardener, was putting lights in her garden when one of her plants pricked her hip last November.

Days later, Mrs. Broude, of Boston, began to feel bad and was quickly taken to A & E before a helicopter took her to the Yale New Haven Hospital where they put her in a coma for a week and underwent surgery. emergency.

Ms. Broude was diagnosed with necrotizing fasciitis (FN) from meat eating infection and remained in the hospital for more than two months, while she underwent seven surgeries to cut dead meat left by the infection.

After doctors told her husband Herbert Rosenfeld, 53, that the bacteria behind her NF is deadly in 97% of cases, Ms. Broude challenged the odds of surviving and, 10 months later, is learning to walk again at home.

Mother of two children Julie Broude (pictured with her daughter Camryn Rosenfeld, 12) almost died after a carnivorous insect ate her leg, hip and buttocks after she was pricked in a bush

Mother of two children Julie Broude (pictured with her daughter Camryn Rosenfeld, 12) almost died after a carnivorous insect ate her leg, hip and buttocks after she was pricked in a bush

Mrs. Broude was diagnosed with necrotizing fasciitis due to meat eating infection in the hospital, where she remained for two months and endured seven surgeries to cut the dead meat. His leg, which was to be amputated, is depicted while healing after surgery

Mrs. Broude was diagnosed with necrotizing fasciitis due to meat eating infection in the hospital, where she remained for two months and endured seven surgeries to cut the dead meat. His leg, which was to be amputated, is depicted while healing after surgery

Mrs. Broude was diagnosed with necrotizing fasciitis due to meat eating infection in the hospital, where she remained for two months and endured seven surgeries to cut the dead meat. His leg, which was to be amputated, is depicted while healing after surgery

Mrs. Broude went into a coma, while the flesh-eating insect ate a large part of her leg. Doctors told her husband Herbert Rosenfeld that he probably would not spend the night

Mrs. Broude went into a coma, while the flesh-eating insect ate a large part of her leg. Doctors told her husband Herbert Rosenfeld that he probably would not spend the night

Mrs. Broude went into a coma, while the flesh-eating insect ate a large part of her leg. Doctors told her husband Herbert Rosenfeld that he probably would not spend the night

After challenging the doctors' expectations to survive, the surgeons were sure that Mrs. Broude's leg would have to be amputated.

However, Ms. Broude recovered once again and now has a large scar on her leg, in addition to losing part of her right buttock and hip.

She said: "Fortunately I was in a coma during the time that I almost died. My husband and my parents had to go through that, every day they played and they left.

"I was not awake for any of that, so I did not have anyone to say, 'You're going to die.' That was all in my family." It was devastating.

"People do not really survive this, so they consider me very lucky."

The doctors reportedly took a look at Mrs. Broude's purple leg and said "oh yes".

The doctors reportedly took a look at Mrs. Broude's purple leg and said "oh yes".

The doctors were not sure what was causing Mrs. Broude's unbearable pain until her leg turned purple. Endured surgery & day after day & # 39; until all the bacteria was eliminated

NECROTIZING FASCIITIS: THE VICIOUS BACTERIA THAT EAT THE FLESH

Necrotizing fasciitis, more commonly known as "carnivorous disease", is a rare but extremely cruel bacterial infection. & # 39; Necrotizing & # 39; it refers to something that causes the body tissue to die, and the infection can destroy the skin, muscles and fat.

The disease develops when the bacteria enters the body, often through a minor cut or scraping. As the bacteria multiply, they release toxins that kill the tissues and cut off the flow of blood to the area.

Because it is so virulent, the bacteria spread rapidly throughout the body.

Symptoms include small red bumps or bumps on the skin, rapidly spreading bruising, sweating, chills, fever, and nausea. Organic failure and shock are also common complications.

Victims should be treated immediately to avoid death, and they are usually given powerful antibiotics and surgery to remove dead tissue. Amputation may be necessary if the disease spreads through an arm or leg.

Patients can undergo skin grafts after the infection has cleared, to help the healing process or for aesthetic reasons.

There are between 500 and 1,500 cases reported per year, but 20 to 25 percent of victims die.

Ms. Broude credits a routine blood test she had the week before she felt bad about saving her life.

She said: "The nurse called me the next day and told me that my white blood cells were very low.

"She said" if you get sick you should go to the emergency room because you do not have many white blood cells. "That's what really saved me."

"Normally, people who are healthy can fight against that, we are all exposed to that because we all go outside, it is very rare for it to enter the body and attack.

Mrs. Broude was taken to the hospital two days after Thanksgiving, where she entered "animal mode," screaming with excruciating pain.

She said: I started getting sick on Thursday, which was Thanksgiving, but at that time my leg did not hurt at all.

"Saturday morning, the pain in my legs started, I called the doctor and my husband took me to the emergency room at Connecticut's Greenwich Hospital, I do not remember that trip.

"I was very thirsty and cried for water." They say that I entered the "animal mode".

After five hours of extremely high doses of painkillers, the doctors had no idea what was wrong until Mrs. Broude's right leg turned purple and she was quickly taken to surgery.

She said: Necrotizing fasciitis is very difficult to diagnose because it is very rare and people do not think about it.

"After five hours, the doctors discovered what was wrong, my husband said they just shouted" oh yes *** "and they took me.

"They did a computerized axial tomography that showed a gas bubble from the hips to the ankles, and when the bacteria eat the meat, it leaves a gas bubble because of the toxins it releases.

"I was quickly taken to surgery before being transferred by helicopter to the intensive care unit at Yale New Haven Hospital. My husband was told that night that he most likely would not.

After having a skin graft, Ms. Broude stayed in the hospital for a month and a half while she healed

After having a skin graft, Ms. Broude stayed in the hospital for a month and a half while she healed

Mrs. Broude's wounds had to be kept open until only black tissue remained. She had to have skin grafts to fill the holes in her leg after large amounts of tissue were removed

Ms. Broude spent three weeks at the Yale New Haven Hospital where surgeons cut off dead tissue from her right leg and gave her a high dose of antibiotics.

She said: "I spent about three weeks in intensive care and it saved my life.

"I also became septic because he got into my blood." I was in a coma for more than a week when my organs started to fail.

"I had a surgery day after day until everything was finally cut.

"In fact, they told my husband that they were taking me to amputate my leg."

"The main loss was in my hip and my ass, so there was not going to be enough structure to take it in. They took me to amputate me, but then, by some miracle, they did not have to.

Once at home, Mrs. Broude had to learn to walk again, which caused her to go into a deep depression. The harsh experience has also been difficult for her children Ethan Rosenfeld, 9, and Camryn, who would look at their mother while she was in the hospital and burst into tears.

Once at home, Mrs. Broude had to learn to walk again, which caused her to go into a deep depression. The harsh experience has also been difficult for her children Ethan Rosenfeld, 9, and Camryn, who would look at their mother while she was in the hospital and burst into tears.

Once at home, Mrs. Broude had to learn to walk again, which caused her to go into a deep depression. The harsh experience has also been difficult for her children Ethan Rosenfeld, 9, and Camryn, who would look at their mother while she was in the hospital and burst into tears.

At the end of 2017, Mrs. Broude was stable enough to be transferred to the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, where she met with her children, Camryn, 9, and Ethan, 11. They gave her skin grafts to mend the holes he left. surgery.

She said: & # 39; After a few weeks I moved to Boston, where is my family. It was in the General of Massachusetts that I had some more surgeries.

& # 39; They had to keep the wounds open until the mistake stopped eating and left that black tissue behind.

"Once all the dead brown things were gone they could sew me up, but that left the giant wound that was grafted in. I was there another month and a half longer when the wounds healed.

"My right buttock is practically gone, so I'm going to have to undergo more surgeries to try to fix it, but that's more aesthetic now."

After almost losing her right leg and being in bed for more than three months, Mrs. Broude had to learn to walk again and, nine months later, she just stopped using a cane.

She said: & # 39; The hardest part [was] coming home and recovering. I went into a deep depression. It has been the most difficult thing in my life. I'm taking high doses of [the opioid painkiller] Oxycodone every day and antidepressants.

"I could only shower every three days and that made me tired". I went down to 80 and a few pounds when I normally am 100 pounds because I could not eat.

"A month passed before I could get out of bed."

Almost 10 months after the ordeal, Mrs. Broude has been able to return to work.

Julie said: "At the beginning of this summer, little by little I began to feel better and go to physical therapy.

"I thought I would never walk again, but gradually I was walking with a walker, then a cane and now nothing." I'm back at work and walking with a slight limp that most people do not notice, everything is now healed and medically all right.

& # 39; The children saw a lot. They did not know that he was in a coma in intensive care; we protected them from that. They were told "mom is very sick and is in the hospital".

"But when I got to Boston, it was very difficult for my daughter: she would see me and cry." My son keeps his emotions up his sleeve. Both had so much school support. That made it so different.

She added: "In that same period of time, in the past 18 months, my husband had a brain tumor and two heart attacks.

"When this happened to me, I had already had a heart attack and a benign brain tumor, so my poor children have gone through many things, but at the same time they have seen us survive everything."

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