The legal recruiter, 27, shares the devastating moment when he discovered he had cramps and was ovarian cancer

Courtney Reynolds, now 27, was planning to move from Wellington to Melbourne when she had severe stomach pains one morning, which ended up being cancer

A 26-year-old woman thought she was experiencing terrible menstrual pain, when in fact she was fighting a tumor.

Courtney Reynolds, now 27, of Wellington, did not notice anything until she had severe stomach pains one morning as she drove to work.

"As I drove, it got worse and worse and, finally, I threw up in a trash can, I was in such pain," he told FEMAIL.

As the pain worsened and prevented her from walking, Courtney was taken to the hospital by her manager to find out what was happening.

Courtney Reynolds, now 27, was planning to move from Wellington to Melbourne when she had severe stomach pains one morning, which ended up being cancer

Courtney Reynolds, now 27, was planning to move from Wellington to Melbourne when she had severe stomach pains one morning, which ended up being cancer

When she arrived at the hospital, Courtney received a high dose of morphine.

The legal recruiter was told later that what she had thought were cramps was actually ovarian cancer.

Doctors think that the tumor, which was 10 centimeters by 10 centimeters and had its own blood supply, had twisted on itself and caused pain.

An ultrasound confirmed that the tumor was "the size of a softball," and placed himself where his right ovary should have been.

"It took me a while to really understand what they were saying, it was not until they put me in my own room with the idea that I started to realize," he said.

Then they gave him a dose of morphine so high that he would have killed someone who did not suffer so much pain

Then they gave him a dose of morphine so high that he would have killed someone who did not suffer so much pain

Then they gave him a dose of morphine so high that he would have killed someone who did not suffer so much pain

This is how the legal recruiter discovered that what she thought were cramps, was actually ovarian cancer (photographed in the hospital)

This is how the legal recruiter discovered that what she thought were cramps, was actually ovarian cancer (photographed in the hospital)

This is how the legal recruiter discovered that what she thought were cramps, was actually ovarian cancer (photographed in the hospital)

Later, the doctors had a general surgeon assigned to remove the tumor and make a "frozen section," meaning it was tried while Courtney was still under anesthesia.

"The results came back as cancerous so the oncologist stepped in and took over, and when I woke up from the surgery they confirmed that I was malignant and I was a bit surprised," Courtney said.

& # 39; It was not what I expected. The tumor was a dysgerminoma, of which two percent are malignant, so it was definitely surprising that mine fell in that two percent. "

The ultrasound revealed that the tumor was "the size of a softball" where his right ovary should have been

The ultrasound revealed that the tumor was "the size of a softball" where his right ovary should have been

The ultrasound revealed that the tumor was "the size of a softball" where his right ovary should have been

Courtney said that this diagnosis was a particular shock because the typical patient for ovarian cancer is usually over 50 and often has a family history of the disease, which she did not.

It was not until I could walk that the alarm bells started ringing

"I'm not very good at tracking my cycle in general, so I just assumed [it was period pain], & # 39; she said.

"My periods and symptoms are quite different from month to month, so it was not until I could walk that alarms started to sound."

Courtney said that this diagnosis was a particular shock because the typical patient for ovarian cancer is usually more than 50 years old and often has a family history of the disease, which she does not

Courtney said that this diagnosis was a particular shock because the typical patient for ovarian cancer is usually more than 50 years old and often has a family history of the disease, which she does not

Courtney said that this diagnosis was a particular shock because the typical patient for ovarian cancer is usually more than 50 years old and often has a family history of the disease, which she does not

When she was in the hospital and an ultrasound was done, the 27-year-old girl was asked if she had already had children.

"The rest is a bit confusing because of the drugs they gave me, but I remember the ambulance officials saying" possible ectopic pregnancy, "he said.

That's when I realized that it was probably more serious than I thought and I started calling my family

At this stage, the worst scenario for the 27-year-old was an ectopic pregnancy.

"Around midnight, a doctor came in and said they had found a mass on the right ovary, but they were not sure what it was and there was a possibility that they had to remove the ovary," he said.

"That's when I realized that it was probably more serious than I thought and I started calling my family."

"Around midnight, a doctor came in and said they had found a mass on the right ovary, but they were not sure what it was and there was a possibility that they had to remove the ovary," he said.

What are the symptoms of ovarian cancer?

The symptoms may be inaccurate, but there are a variety of possible symptoms, which may include:

– Pain in the lower abdomen or pelvic area

– Swelling and feeling of fullness in the belly (abdomen)

– Having the sensation of urinating more urgently and frequently

– Loss of appetite

Source: Ovarian cancer Australia

After going to the hospital on a Tuesday, Courtney's operation occurred the following Friday.

His surgeon told him that once the tumor was removed, he would also remove the surrounding tissue and wash it with saline to check for any loose cells.

"He explained that they would do everything possible to preserve my fertility, since I have not had any children yet," Courtney said.

They sent the tumor to perform more tests and determine what stage it was in and they delayed it with chemotherapy until they knew how much progress had been made.

A week later they confirmed that it was stage 1A. Because it was such a rare cancer, they did not have a standard procedure to follow, so they gave Courtney the option of receiving chemotherapy or not.

"I chose not to do it because it's a brutal process and I also know that it has an impact on fertility," he said.

Instead, they placed her on a five-year surveillance plan, and although she is now out of the "high-risk zone," she will remain under observation for another three years.

His surgeon told him that once the tumor was removed, he would also remove the surrounding tissue and wash it with saline to check for loose cells.

His surgeon told him that once the tumor was removed, he would also remove the surrounding tissue and wash it with saline to check for loose cells.

His surgeon told him that once the tumor was removed, he would also remove the surrounding tissue and wash it with saline to check for loose cells.

The legal recruiter said the diagnosis changed his life and changed the way he treats his body.

Now he has begun to pay more attention to how they make him feel different foods or what his menstrual cycle is doing.

"The emotional price really did not come until I went back to work and lived my normal life," Courtney said.

"I was definitely suffering from anxiety, I was too conscious of my body and, to be honest, I became a bit hypochondriac, every pang or pain suddenly felt like cancer."

Finally, this sensation vanished when he realized how lucky he was because he was in so much pain that day, since that is the only reason why the tumor was detected.

"I also started living life a little more: you never know how much time you have." Nobody does it, "Courtney said.

Ovarian cancer is called the "silent killer" because the symptoms are very difficult to detect.

For that reason, it is usually detected at such a late stage that the survival rates are particularly low.

& # 39; Papanicolaou tests do not detect ovarian cancer. Girls need to find a GP they trust and if they are really worried, request a blood test or an ultrasound, "he said.

"Nobody cares more about your health than you, not even a doctor.

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