Home Australia The Kabi Kabi people receive native title over an area of ​​356,345 hectares in Queensland

The Kabi Kabi people receive native title over an area of ​​356,345 hectares in Queensland

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On Monday, the Federal Court formally recognized the Kabi Kabi people as holders of native title over land including Noosa (pictured), Bribie Island, Gympie, Maroochydore, Caloundra and Mudjimba Island.

An indigenous group has been granted native title over a 356,345 hectare property in Queensland.

On Monday, the Federal Court formally recognized the Kabi Kabi people as holders of native title over land that includes Noosa, Bribie Island, Gympie, Maroochydore, Caloundra and Mudjimba Island.

Non-exclusive title rights mean that the Kabi Kabi people have the right to hunt and camp in the area, but not to control access to or use of the area.

Non-Indigenous people still have the right to use the land under non-exclusive native title, and those who own property or homes in the areas will not be affected.

Judge Berna Collier told the court the group “has and always has had native title rights and interests in this country”.

On Monday, the Federal Court formally recognized the Kabi Kabi people as holders of native title over land including Noosa (pictured), Bribie Island, Gympie, Maroochydore, Caloundra and Mudjimba Island.

“I congratulate all those involved for reaching agreement on this matter, but in particular the Kabi Kabi people, whose native title rights and interests have today received well-deserved recognition.”

The lawsuit was filed back in 2013.

Monday’s decision only applies to one section of the Kabi Kabi people’s claim. Two other sections of the additional land claim have yet to be determined.

Native land title rights recognize the rights of the indigenous group to “access, be present, move and travel through the area.”

Judge Collier told the court that the decision did not confer on native title holders “possession, occupation, use or enjoyment to the exclusion of all others, including other interests defined in the judgment and which continue to have effect”.

Kabi Kabi traditional owner Brian Warner said it was a bittersweet moment as some elders had died before title deeds were granted.

“A lot of people have been here from the beginning, but we’ve lost a lot of seniors along the way,” he said.

“So it’s very emotional: we’re mourning those we lost but celebrating our future and our people.”

More to come

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