The interruption of the MoviePass service causes a double disappointment for users who are forced to choose among the poor …

<pre><pre>The interruption of the MoviePass service causes a double disappointment for users who are forced to choose among the poor ...

MoviePass, a discount service for cinema tickets in cinemas, disappointed users again over the weekend with an interruption in service, as well as a new policy that limits options to a choice between two films.

Prior to the service cut that left viewers hopeless with no options, those who could access the application had to choose between "Slender Man", which received less than stellar criticism, and off-season schedules for the last delivery in the & # 39; Mission: Impossible Series.

This is the latest disappointment for the company's relatively new users, who have seen declines in the value of their subscriptions in recent weeks.

CEO Mitch Lowe confirmed to the New York Post on Friday that the policy of choosing two films will continue to move forward, adding that the two movies available to select can change each day.

"Unfortunately, to keep us financially stable, we had to restrict the service," Lowe said.

"We had to straighten the boat in terms of the amount of money we were burning."

Other changes are also envisaged, including no more daily tickets until August 15, which will be replaced with a maximum of only three films per month, which according to the application will affect 15 percent of users.

MoviePass, a discount service for cinema tickets in cinemas, disappointed users again over the weekend with a service interruption and a new policy that limited the options to a choice between two movies, which this weekend included Slender Man and Peaks of the latest installment of the Mission series: Impossible

MoviePass, a discount service for cinema tickets in cinemas, disappointed users again over the weekend with a service interruption and a new policy that limited the options to a choice between two movies, which this weekend included Slender Man and Peaks of the latest installment of the Mission series: Impossible

MoviePass, a discount service for cinema tickets in theaters, disappointed users again over the weekend with a service interruption and a new policy that limited the options to a choice between two movies, which this weekend included the badly qualified & # 39; Slender Man & # 39; (right) and only off-season performances of & # 39; Mission: Impossible – Fallout & # 39; starring Tom Cruise (left)

Slender Man, a horror movie, has a mere 16 percent rating on Rotten Tomatoes, a crowd review site where audience members rate movies.

And in New York City, the only slots available to watch & # 39; Mission: Impossible – Fallout & # 39; It was 2.30 p.m. and 10.45 p.m. With a run time of 147 minutes, that would leave the viewers who worked during the day leaving the night and showing around 1.45 the next morning.

MoviePass said it did not intentionally restrict the schedules of the movie Mission: Impossible, more desirable.

"This has been a challenging time for us and our customers," Lowe said.

"We are trying to save our service in order to be available in the long term."

On Monday, the service retraced a 50 percent plan price increase after a violent reaction from the subscriber.

However, the company, hungry for cash, will soon impose a cap on three films per month, instead of one each day.

The company says the new plan will include many of the major studio premiere movies, though there will be exceptions that the company did not specify.

By doing so, MoviePass is rescinding a recent cost reduction movement that prohibits viewing of most major releases during the first two weeks.

MoviePass has shown that many moviegoers will get to theaters when movies are affordable, despite the most convenient options, such as Netflix and video on demand.

US movie ticket sales have risen 8 percent so far this year, according to comScore. MoviePass claims credit for some of that.

MoviePass has made many fortuitous changes in recent weeks to reduce costs, including blocking most or all night projections, regardless of when the movie came out.

MoviePass has made many fortuitous changes in recent weeks to reduce costs, including blocking most or all night projections, regardless of when the movie came out.

MoviePass has made many fortuitous changes in recent weeks to reduce costs, including blocking most or all night projections, regardless of when the movie came out.

MoviePass has grown to 3 million subscribers, of around 20,000, since it cut the monthly rates almost a year ago to $ 10, from as high as $ 50.

But that success has proven to be expensive. Because MoviePass generally pays movie theaters for the total cost of tickets, which can be $ 15 or more in large cities, a single movie can put the service in red.

Recently, its parent company had to apply for an emergency loan of $ 5 million to pay its payment processors after unpaid payments caused service interruptions.

MoviePass has made many fortuitous changes in recent weeks to reduce costs, including blocking most or all night projections, regardless of when the movie came out.

That has provoked complaints from subscribers, some of whom have threatened to go to a rival plan of the AMC cinema chain.

Although MoviePass says it is not raising monthly prices to $ 15, there is still a hidden price increase. The company already has a plan of three movies for $ 8 a month. Now, that plan will be $ 10.

MoviePass is also rescinding other cost-cutting measures, which include surcharges for popular movies and show times and requirements to send photographs of ticket stubs to combat fraud.

MoviePass says the new limit will affect only 15 percent of subscribers, which includes those who now watch four or more movies each month.

The new limits will come into effect on August 15, although those with annual subscriptions will not be affected until their renewal date.

The share price of MoviePass' parent company, Helios and Matheson Analytics Inc., rose 19 percent to close at 8 cents on Monday, although it is still below the nearly $ 50 a month ago, adjusted by a reverse division of shares.

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