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There is a blackboard in the Boelter Hall of UCLA with comparisons and schedules that led to the Arpanet in 1969 and today marks the 50th anniversary when this comparison sent the first message via the internet

Exactly 50 years ago, today, two students celebrated their success after sending the first message about what the modern internet became.

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However, the early pioneers are now concerned that what is designed to democratize the public, instead a & # 39; perfect formula for the dark side & # 39; has created

They believe that a moderate voice is drowned out online and extreme views are strengthened – making hatred, misinformation, and abuse a platform to stand up for.

On October 29, 1969, the students gave the word & # 39; login & # 39; through a network funded by the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA).

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There is a blackboard in the Boelter Hall of UCLA with comparisons and schedules that led to the Arpanet in 1969 and today marks the 50th anniversary when this comparison sent the first message via the internet

There is a blackboard in the Boelter Hall of UCLA with comparisons and schedules that led to the Arpanet in 1969 and today marks the 50th anniversary when this comparison sent the first message via the internet

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The internet pioneers were Charley Kline from the University of California-Los Angeles and Bill Duvall from the Stanford Research Institute.

The idea was to send a message from Los Angeles to Stanford via the ARPA connection, known as ARPANET.

Kline wanted the word & # 39; login & # 39; send to Duvall, but only managed to & # 39; lo & # 39; get out before the system crashed.

But on the second attempt, the entire message was sent to the computer in Stanford.

Shown is a teletype similar to a type that was used to communicate with the Sigma 7 computer and was connected to the UCLA's Interface Message Processor in the birthplace of the Internet

Shown is a teletype similar to a type that was used to communicate with the Sigma 7 computer and was connected to the UCLA's Interface Message Processor in the birthplace of the Internet

Shown is a teletype similar to a type that was used to communicate with the Sigma 7 computer and was connected to the UCLA's Interface Message Processor in the birthplace of the Internet

Charley Kline from the University of California-Los Angeles, sent the word & # 39; login & # 39; to another student at Stanford

Charley Kline from the University of California-Los Angeles, sent the word & # 39; login & # 39; to another student at Stanford

Bill Duvall from the Stanford Research Institute was at the end of the message
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Bill Duvall from the Stanford Research Institute was at the end of the message

The internet pioneers were Charley Kline (left) from the University of California-Los Angeles and Bill Duvall (right) from the Stanford Research Institute. The idea was to send a message from Los Angeles to Stanford via the ARPA connection,

ARPANET was decommissioned in 1990, but it laid the foundation for what would become the modern internet.

As time went on, a series of hardware and software developments would open up this technology to the public and bring it out of the computer world and into the homes and pockets of billions of people.

Duvall told Fast operation, & # 39; This was actually where the paradigm that we now see on the internet with linked documents and that sort of thing was first developed. & # 39;

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& # 39; We always thought we would have a series of interconnected workstations and interconnected people. & # 39;

& # 39; We called them knowledge centers at the time because we were academically oriented. & # 39;

Leonard Kleinrock (photo), professor at the University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA), developed the mathematical theory behind packet change and sent the first message between two computers on a network that was a precursor to the internet

Leonard Kleinrock (photo), professor at the University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA), developed the mathematical theory behind packet change and sent the first message between two computers on a network that was a precursor to the internet

Leonard Kleinrock (photo), professor at the University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA), developed the mathematical theory behind packet change and sent the first message between two computers on a network that was a precursor to the internet

THE INTERNET

The Advanced Research Projects Agency Network (ARPANET) of the US Department of Defense or the "Eve" network was first published in 1967.

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Two years later it became a way of interconnection for four university computers.

Towards the end of 1970, ARPANET users transferred files via FTP, and a year later they called into a network via a PC.

In the 1980s, ARPANET was transferred to a new military network, Defense Data Network and NSFNet.

Around the same time, the system adopted TCP / IP, allowing researchers to create the "networks of networks" – the small beginnings of modern internet.

Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web in 1989.

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Although Kline and Duvall are celebrated for sending the first message via an internet connection, there were some founders who came before the two students.

Bob Taylor, a key figure in computer history, worked at ARPA and led the creation of a single computer network to link ARPA-sponsored researchers to companies and institutions around the world.

There was also Leonard Kleinrock, professor at the University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA), who developed the mathematical theory behind packet change and sent the first message between two computers on a network that was a precursor to the internet.

While UCLA celebrates its anniversary, Professor Leonard Kleinrock opens a new lab that focuses solely on all things related to the internet

It will in particular be devoted to analyzing and studying the unintended consequences on the internet.

& # 39; To some extent, everyone is democratizing, & # 39; said Kleinrock AFP.

& # 39; But it is also a perfect formula for the dark side, as we have learned. & # 39;

So much is being said online that moderate voices are being drowned out and extreme views are being strengthened, spreading hatred, misinformation and abuse, he argued.

& # 39; As engineers, we didn't think in terms of nasty behavior & # 39 ;, Kleinrock said, 85.

& # 39; I completely missed the social network side. I thought of people talking to computers or computers talking to computers, not people talking to people. & # 39;

Shown is 3420 Boelter Hall, the birthplace of the Internet at UCLA in Los Angeles, California
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Shown is 3420 Boelter Hall, the birthplace of the Internet at UCLA in Los Angeles, California

Shown is 3420 Boelter Hall, the birthplace of the Internet at UCLA in Los Angeles, California

Students from the Connection Lab will explore topics such as machine learning, social networking, blockchain and the internet of things, & # 39; with a view to thwarting online evils & # 39 ;, AFP reported.

Blockchain technology seems to be at the top of Kleinrock's list because he is interested in how it attaches to a person's reputation or how it is used to gauge online trust.

& # 39; It's a reputation network that is constantly up-to-date & # 39 ;, said Kleinrock.

INTERNET REACH

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An internet cartographer and computer scientist have revealed how far the reach of the internet is by mapping the location of millions of online devices around the world.

It reveals the hotspots where internet connectivity is flourishing and the blackspots where it is only just beginning to develop as the web spreads to the farthest corners of the world.

The only start of the internet was just 42 computers, now an internet cartographer and computer scientist shows how far the reach of the internet is by plotting the location of millions of online devices around the world

The only start of the internet was just 42 computers, now an internet cartographer and computer scientist shows how far the reach of the internet is by plotting the location of millions of online devices around the world

The only start of the internet was only 42 computers, now an internet cartographer and computer scientist shows how far the reach of the internet is by plotting the location of millions of online devices around the world

Texas-based John Matherly used software to ping internet-connected devices around the world & # 39; based on their IP or internet protocol, address and to listen to their response.

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In most cases, the signal revealed the location of internet routers instead of individual gadgets, but Mr. Matherly said that iPhone and Android devices appeared earlier.

In total it took him about five hours to ping all IP & # 39; s on the internet, and then another 12 hours to make the card.

His newest map is an update of an image from 2014 that helps show how internet access has spread over the past two years.

The most striking is the proliferation of internet connectivity in India, as well as a general increase in the density of connected devices worldwide.

The highest density of internet access can be found in Europe and on the east coast of the United States.

Although central US has surprisingly low connectivity – mainly due to lower population levels – there is intense concentration in California around Silicon Valley.

& # 39; The challenge is how you can do that in an ethical and responsible manner; anonymity is of course a double-edged sword. & # 39;

Kleinrock also points companies to the misuse of the Internet as a way of violating people's privacy to increase profits – rather than just blaming hackers.

& # 39; We were not the social scientists we should have been & # 39 ;, he said about the early days of the internet.

He regretted a lack of foresight to build in the basics of internet tools for better authentication of users and data files.

& # 39; It would not have avoided the dark side, but it would have improved it & he said.

He remained optimistic about the problems of the internet that were solved with coding, blockchain or other innovations.

& # 39; I'm still worried. "I think everyone feels the impact of this very dark side of the internet that has surfaced," Kleinrock said.

& # 39; I still feel that the benefits are much greater; I would not switch off the internet if I could. & # 39;

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