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The incredible optical illusion reveals how the field of vision affects the perception of speed.

How your field of vision affects the perception of speed: the incredible optical illusion reveals that the removal of objects from your peripheral vision deceives the brain to think that it moves more slowly than it is

  • A restricted field of vision, when enlarged, makes things seem slower
  • However, when the full field of vision is available, things seem to move faster.
  • Psychology professor Akiyoshi Kitaoka demonstrated it by recording from the front of a train.

A well-known master of optical illusions has revealed the importance of a person's field of vision in the perception of speed.

The professor of psychology at Ritsumeikan University of Japan, Akiyoshi Kitaoka, filmed from the front of a train and approached the tracks below.

The strange phenomenon tricks the brain into thinking that the train travels slower when the footage approaches.

It is partly due to the fact that fewer objects can be seen on the periphery, which gives less reference to how quickly things happen.

The professor of psychology at Ritsumeikan University of Japan, Akiyoshi Kitaoka, filmed from the front of a train and approached the tracks below. The strange phenomenon tricks the brain into thinking that the train travels slower when the footage approaches

The professor of psychology at Ritsumeikan University of Japan, Akiyoshi Kitaoka, filmed from the front of a train and approached the tracks below. The strange phenomenon tricks the brain into thinking that the train travels slower when the footage approaches

HOW DOES THE VISION FIELD CHANGE THE PERCEPTION OF SPEED?

Scientists have long known that things appear faster when a person has an expanded field of vision.

This allows you to see more things on the periphery, which makes things seem to happen faster.

However, the opposite is also true, if a person has a restricted field of vision, he sees that things are slower than they really are.

This phenomenon changes the way the video is seen in the brain and the optical illusion has been exploited by the cinema.

For example, in action movies, they eliminate the entire frame of reference and restrict the field of vision to make things seem more dramatic, such as car chases or airplane overflights.

The video was shared on Twitter by the teacher entitled & # 39; Differences in perceived speed & # 39 ;.

On a formal page of the university he works for, he says: & # 39; When observers take a train and watch the front scene with a video camera, the train speed seems to be slower when the camera zooms.

"In contrast, the speed seems to be faster when the camera moves away."

When Dr. Kitaoka approaches through the front window of a train, the video seems to go in slow motion.

However, as other videos posted in their feed attest, the train travels at a constant speed.

The first zoom level shows the inside of the cabin, as well as the buildings and overpasses that fly in the foreground.

An incremental increase in zoom reduces the range of footage and things seem to slow down immediately.

The video was published on the formal university site accompanied by the information: "When observers take a train and watch the front scene with a video camera, the train speed seems to be slower when the camera is approaching." exploits a known optical illusion

The video was published on the formal site of the university accompanied by the information: "When observers take a train and watch the front scene with a video camera, the train speed seems to be slower when the camera approaches." exploits a known optical illusion

The video was published on the formal university site accompanied by the information: "When observers take a train and watch the front scene with a video camera, the train speed seems to be slower when the camera is approaching." exploits a known optical illusion

Although the edge of the slopes and structures are still within the field of vision, many of the wider distractions have been eliminated,

The next time the teacher expands the effect is more dramatic, with all the driver's cabin signs removed from view and only the porches and visible tracks.

The removal of the vertical panel from the driver's door is a crucial step, since it eliminates the only main reference point.

As things fly beyond this fixed point, the brain can infer speed, and without it it almost seems that things hardly move.

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