The incredible drone has wings that collapse & # 399; like origami & # 039;

Scientists have created a drone inspired by insects with wings that collapse

Scientists have created a drone inspired by insects with wings that collapse "like origami" when it collides with obstacles in the middle of the flight.

The new drone is so flexible that it can absorb the blows without breaking before returning to its initial shape.

Engineers say the revolutionary design was inspired by insect wings and the ancient Japanese art of folding paper, which makes it rigid and flexible.

It could revolutionize drone technology by making flying vehicles more durable in crashes and other collisions.

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Scientists have created a drone inspired by insects with wings that collapse "like origami" when it collides with obstacles. The new drone (in the image) is so flexible that it can absorb impacts without breaking before returning to its initial shape

Researchers at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL) developed the new hybrid origami drone.

When it is in the air, the structure remains rigid enough to support its own weight and resist the thrust of the propellers.

However, when the drone hits something, it will absorb the impact as it becomes flexible, a resistance that comes from its unique combination of rigid and elastic layers.

To achieve this, the researchers stretched an "elastomer membrane" between rigid plates.

When an external force is not applied to the system, it will stay together and give rigidity to the structure.

But when enough force is applied, the plates separate and the structure can bend.

"When we make a drone, we can give it specific mechanical properties," said the project's lead scientist, Dr. Stefano Mintchev of EPFL.

& # 39; This includes, for example, defining the time when the structure changes from rigid to flexible & # 39;

Dr. Mintchev said that the rigid and flexible structures at the same time have a range of other possible applications, adding that previously he used the same technology to create a soft-touch clamp.

The clamp softens once it reaches a certain level of pressure so as not to break the object it is collecting.

Researchers at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL) developed the hybrid origami drone. When it is in the air, the structure is rigid enough to support its own weight and resist the thrust of the propellers. In the photo is the project scientist, Dr. Stefano Mintchev

Researchers at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL) developed the hybrid origami drone. When it is in the air, the structure is rigid enough to support its own weight and resist the thrust of the propellers. In the photo is the project scientist, Dr. Stefano Mintchev

Researchers at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL) developed the hybrid origami drone. When it is in the air, the structure is rigid enough to support its own weight and resist the thrust of the propellers. In the photo is the project scientist, Dr. Stefano Mintchev

WHAT IS & DRIVE-DIVING? & # 39;

Aerones is also the company behind "drones diving", a new extreme sport that involves lifting someone up in the air with a 28-propeller drone and safely dropping it to the ground.

The preparation for the jump lasted six months and during that time, the team increased the load of up to 440 pounds (200 kg) and conducted a series of tests, including flights that carried Augstkalns over the Daugava River.

The super-powered drone measures 34 feet (3.2 m 2), has 16 rotors and weighs 154 pounds (70 kilograms).

The amazing video of the & dquo; dipping in drones & # 39; It shows the unmanned aircraft taking off from a body of water and heading towards a communications tower, which measures 393 feet (120 meters) in height.

A reckless demonstrator grabbed a long handle that hung from the drone, which took it off the platform and threw it into the air.

Once the drone reached 1,082 feet (330 meters), he released it and fell to the ground for about a second before releasing a parachute.

The same drone was used in January to debut with the "drones approach" dragging snowboarders at high speed through an icy Latvian lake.

A video shared by the firm showed a drone snowboarder test at an abandoned air base.

This also means that you can not pick up a load that exceeds your capacity.

"The current trend in robotics is to create" softer "robots that can adapt to a certain function and operate safely with humans," said Professor Dario Floreano, who was also involved in the investigation.

"But some applications also require a certain level of rigidity.

"With our system, we have shown that you can find the right balance between the two."

The research, published in the journal Science Robotics, is being carried out at the Intelligent Systems Laboratory of Professor Dario Floreano at EPFL.

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