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The image shows the impact of litter on our oceans with small fish forced to live in an empty coke can

Can you see us here? Two tiny fish peering out of a coke, they may have become a home for Indonesia in a grim illustration of how litter pollutes our oceans

  • New photos show shocking damage that litter causes to the marine environment
  • The impact of waste on the oceans has pushed up the global agenda in recent years

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These extraordinary photographs show how marine animals are forced to adapt to litter that is left in their habitat.

The British diver Alex Tattersall took the pictures in Lambeh Street, North Sulawesi, Indonesia, representing small yellow pygmy caves that make their house into an empty coke can.

These fish are about an inch long and are usually found in the western Pacific Ocean near Indonesia and Australia, and feed largely on zooplankton.

The question of how we dispose of our waste has been put on the international agenda in recent years, especially in view of the fact that naturalist Sir David Attenborough is raising awareness about how plastic products pose an increasing threat to marine life.

The scale of & # 39; the world's discarded litter problem is uncovered on this photo by freelance photographer Dr. Alex Tattersall, taken in the Lambeh Straits, North Sulawesi, Indonesia, the photos show how marine animals (yellow Pygmy Gobies shown) in an empty coke can) have to adapt to the changes in their natural habitat caused by waste that is thrown away in the seas

The scale of & # 39; the world's discarded litter problem is uncovered on this photo by freelance photographer Dr. Alex Tattersall, taken in the Lambeh Straits, North Sulawesi, Indonesia, the photos show how marine animals (yellow Pygmy Gobies shown) in an empty coke can) have to adapt to the changes in their natural habitat caused by waste that is thrown away in the seas

Another shocking picture shows the extent of litter pollution in our ocean, while another empty coke is made in a house by two small yellow Pygmy Gobies for Indonesia.

Another shocking picture shows the extent of litter pollution in our ocean, while another empty coke is made in a house by two small yellow Pygmy Gobies for Indonesia.

Another shocking picture shows the extent of litter pollution in our ocean, while another empty coke is made in a house by two small yellow Pygmy Gobies for Indonesia.

A close up of the small fish, which is common in the western Pacific, is 2.5 cm in size and mainly eats zooplankton

A close up of the small fish, which is common in the western Pacific, is 2.5 cm in size and mainly eats zooplankton

A close up of the small fish, which is common in the western Pacific, is 2.5 cm in size and mainly eats zooplankton

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