The "ice queen" who took charge of drug trafficking in the rural city is imprisoned for eight years

Jasmine Bourne, 28, (pictured) has been incarcerated for eight years after pleading guilty to six counts, including trafficking in a commercial amount of methamphetamine

A woman who became the "ice queen" of a multi-million dollar anti-drug network after her former boss was imprisoned was sentenced to eight years in prison.

Jasmine Bourne, 28, was a low-level drug trafficker who worked in a former Wangaratta drug union in 2014.

Wangaratta, a small town in Victoria, near the New South Wales border, is unofficially known as the "ice capital" of Australia.

Bourne then set up his own union, overseeing the supply of drugs from Melbourne after his boss Jessica Fogarty was imprisoned for seven years in 2016.

Jasmine Bourne, 28, (pictured) has been incarcerated for eight years after pleading guilty to six counts, including trafficking in a commercial amount of methamphetamine

Jasmine Bourne, 28, (pictured) has been incarcerated for eight years after pleading guilty to six counts, including trafficking in a commercial amount of methamphetamine

In November 2016, she was arrested in possession of 79.2 grams of ice, a gun, ammunition and a record of drug sales, according to The Age.

Judge John Smallwood handed down the verdict in Shepparton County Court Thursday after Bourne pleaded guilty to six counts, including trafficking in a commercial amount of methamphetamine.

In November 2016, the call & # 39; ice queen & # 39; Wangaratta was arrested in possession of 79.2 grams of ice, a handgun, ammunition and a drug sales record.

In November 2016, the call & # 39; ice queen & # 39; Wangaratta was arrested in possession of 79.2 grams of ice, a handgun, ammunition and a drug sales record.

In November 2016, the call & # 39; ice queen & # 39; Wangaratta was arrested in possession of 79.2 grams of ice, a handgun, ammunition and a drug sales record.

Bourne (left) started his own drug union that operated in Melbourne in 2016, three weeks after his previous boss was imprisoned, under which he had worked as a low-level drug dealer.

Bourne (left) started his own drug union that operated in Melbourne in 2016, three weeks after his previous boss was imprisoned, under which he had worked as a low-level drug dealer.

Bourne (left) started his own drug union that operated in Melbourne in 2016, three weeks after his previous boss was imprisoned, under which he had worked as a low-level drug dealer.

During 2016, more than three kilograms of ice were sold for approximately $ 872,000, as Bourne oversaw the supply of medicines and the collection of debts from Melbourne.

Judge Smallwood said that a phone call between Bourne and her mother, two weeks after she was taken to jail, spoke about items she kept in a safe.

Bourne said: "It must be done today, I will give you a code and there are things to burn."

The judge took into account the fact that Bourne had suffered from anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder, and "went off the rails" when he struck up a relationship with an abusive man.

Bourne replaced Jessica Fogarty (pictured), who was sentenced to seven years in prison for running the ice and cocaine union in Wangaratta.

Bourne replaced Jessica Fogarty (pictured), who was sentenced to seven years in prison for running the ice and cocaine union in Wangaratta.

Bourne replaced Jessica Fogarty (pictured), who was sentenced to seven years in prison for running the ice and cocaine union in Wangaratta.

With time already served, Bourne will be eligible for parole in 2021.

Jessica Fogarty traded drugs and weapons as part of the multi-million dollar ring between 2010 and 2014, often paying off debts with guns.

In recent years, Wangaratta has become one of the many regional Victorian cities that are now known as a hotbed for drug use, and locals said that in 2016 more and more people used ice and other methamphetamines.

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