The horror of the Indian as a single HORN grows at the end of his PEN

<pre><pre>The horror of the Indian as a single HORN grows at the end of his PEN

An Indian was left with an inch-long horn growing on the tip of his penis, according to a strange report in the case.

The strange growth of 60 years was a side effect of an operation to repair his urethra, doctors say.

Two months after the surgery, the nameless man went to see his doctor after worrying about the horn growing on his penis.

Specialists at King George Medical University, Lucknow – 330 miles (531 km) southeast of New Delhi – eliminated growth.

However, when writing in a prestigious medical journal, they revealed how it grew larger than before, reaching 2.5 cm.

The strange growth of 60 years was a side effect of an operation to repair his urethra, say doctors in Lucknow

The story was published in the British Medical Journal Case Reports, where doctors have presented a series of strange discoveries.

The doctors led by Dr. Ajay Aggarwa revealed that the growth was a "penile cutaneous horn", which the images show yellow and brown.

The surgeons removed the horn from the penis once more and a biopsy ruled out the growth as cancerous.

Dr. Aggarwa and his colleagues revealed that the site of the man's surgery "healed well". and he did not suffer persistent changes in his penis.

The man had lichen sclerosus, a long-term skin condition that affects the genitals, causing itching and white patches.

WHAT ARE PENIS HORNS?

The horns of the penis are usually accumulations of keratin, the same protein that forms the hair, skin and nails.

Writing in the BMJ case reports, doctors at King George Medical University said the cause "is not clear."

However, "surgical trauma, long-term phimosis (tight foreskin), radiation therapy or malignancy (cancer) may be to blame," they wrote.

But Professor Chris Bunker, a consultant dermatologist, said the horns are likely caused by lichen sclerosus, a long-term skin condition that affects the genitals.

The spokesman for the British Skin Foundation described the horn as "incredibly rare," but said it would be more common in India.

Professor Bunker told MailOnline that this is because there are more people in the Asian country and access to health care is poorer.

The incurable condition caused his urethra to narrow, which is why he had the operation in the first place.

Cutaneous horns are often excessive accumulations of keratin, the same protein that forms hair, skin and nails.

Writing in the BMJ case reports, Dr. Aggarwa and his colleagues added that the cause of a penile horn is "not clear".

However, "surgical trauma, long-term phimosis (tight foreskin), radiation therapy, or malignancy (cancer) may be to blame.

Dr. Aggarwa and his colleagues wrote: "Patients generally seek treatment due to disfigurement and difficulty during sexual intercourse.

"It's annoying for patients, sometimes it greatly affects their sex life."

But Professor Chris Bunker, a consultant dermatologist, claimed that the horn was probably caused by his lichen sclerosus, not by surgery.

The spokesman for the British Skin Foundation described the horn as "incredibly rare," but said it would be more common in India.

Professor Bunker told MailOnline that this is because there are more people in the Asian country and access to health care is poorer.

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