The grieving mother who suffered from the stillborn baby begs Facebook not to bombard her anymore with baby ads

Mother & # 39; s heartbreak: Washington Post staff member Gillian Brockell, who delivered a stillborn baby this month, wrote an open letter to tech companies who begged Tuesday to stop engulfing her feed with ads promoting maternity products

A devastated Washington Post employee who delivered a stillborn baby boy earlier this month wrote an open letter to Facebook and other Silicon Valley giants who begged them to stop engulfing her feed with ads promoting motherhood and baby products.

Gillian Brockell, a video editor at The Post, and her husband of a year, Bobby Gulshan, lost their child, that they planned to name Sohan, of unspecified in utero complications on December 1, about 32 weeks in her pregnancy.

Brockell broke the scathing news about her twitter and Instagram page & # 39; s, but according to her letter to technical companies, this has not prevented them from displaying advertisements for maternity bras, strollers and nursery furnishings.

Mother & # 39; s heartbreak: Washington Post staff member Gillian Brockell, who delivered a stillborn baby this month, wrote an open letter to tech companies who begged Tuesday to stop engulfing her feed with ads promoting maternity products

Mother & # 39; s heartbreak: Washington Post staff member Gillian Brockell, who delivered a stillborn baby this month, wrote an open letter to tech companies who begged Tuesday to stop engulfing her feed with ads promoting maternity products

The written plea of ​​Brockell has gone viral and has made almost 2000 sympathetic comments

The written plea of ​​Brockell has gone viral and has made almost 2000 sympathetic comments

The written plea of ​​Brockell has gone viral and has made almost 2000 sympathetic comments

& # 39; I know you knew I was pregnant, & # 39; writes Brockell in the opening of the letter she has tweeted on Tuesday. & # 39; It's my fault, I just could not resist those Instagram hashtags – # 30weekspregant, #babybump. And stupid me!, I even clicked once or twice on the ads for pregnancy wear that Facebook has served. & # 39;

On her Instagram page, multiple selfies are displayed that track the growth of her baby bump and related content and evoke the upcoming birth of her first child.

Brockell goes on to argue that if Facebook's algorithm was able to determine that she was pregnant by following her searches for maternity-related merchandise and social media messages about her baby shower, she should also have been able to determine that her pregnancy ended in a stillbirth.

Brockell and her husband, Bobby, were ready to welcome their first child together, a boy they were going to call Sohan, on January 24

Brockell and her husband, Bobby, were ready to welcome their first child together, a boy they were going to call Sohan, on January 24

Brockell and her husband, Bobby, were ready to welcome their first child together, a boy they were going to call Sohan, on January 24

& # 39; Did not you see me googling & # 39 ;, is this braxton? & # 39; and "baby does not move?" & # 39; asks Brockell. & # 39; Have you not seen the three days of silence, unusual for a user with high frequencies like me? And then the announcement with keywords like "broken heart" and "problem" and "stillborn" and the two hundred drop-shaped emoticons of my friends? Is not that something that you could follow? & # 39;

Brushell: on 30 November, Brockell went on Twitter to tell the news that her and Bobby's son would be stillborn

Brushell: on 30 November, Brockell went on Twitter to tell the news that her and Bobby's son would be stillborn

Brushell: on 30 November, Brockell went on Twitter to tell the news that her and Bobby's son would be stillborn

In a heartbreaking tweet on November 30, Brocklell, on behalf of herself and her husband, shared the news that baby Sohan will be stillborn.

"Without our knowledge, something went wrong a few weeks ago, he stopped growing and then died some time Tuesday or Wednesday, & # 39; she wrote that Friday.

She also said that her doctors have an idea of ​​what has happened and that she and Bobby will try to become pregnant again in the future.

& # 39; But now we are broke from & # 39 ;, read the statement.

In her open letter to the Silicon Valley giants, Brockell writes that parents who "with the most empty arms in the world & # 39; come home from the hospital and turn to social media in their hour of grief, hoping for a temporary distraction from sobbing in bed & # 39; Days are instead reminded of their loss with ads chosen by an algorithm that has decided that pregnancy and childbirth have a "happy result & # 39; had.

Brockell argued that if algorithms from technical companies knew she was pregnant by following her searches and messages, they should have known that she had lost her baby

Brockell argued that if algorithms from technical companies knew she was pregnant by following her searches and messages, they should have known that she had lost her baby

Brockell argued that if algorithms from technical companies knew she was pregnant by following her searches and messages, they should have known that she had lost her baby

& # 39; Please, technical companies, I beg you: if you are smart enough to realize that I am pregnant, that I have given birth, then you are certainly smart enough to realize that my baby died and can advertise for me accordingly, or perhaps perhaps not at all, 'writes Brockell in conclusion.

The Postjournalist's passionate plea has gone viral, with more than 19,000 retweets and almost 2000 sympathetic remarks, including from Monica Lewinsky and Brockell's colleague at the post Alexandra Petri.

Brockell later tweeted that someone from Facebook approached her in response to her plea, but she did not go into details.

http://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js .