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In this photo of May 17, 2019, abortion opponent Teresa Pettis, right, greets a passer-by outside the Planned Parenthood clinic in St. Louis. Planned Parenthood says that Missouri & # 39; s only abortion clinic might be closed at the end of the week because the state threatens not to renew its license, which expires Friday May 31

The Republican governor of the Missouri, Mike Parson, said Wednesday that it & # 39; reckless & # 39; would be if a judge took action to keep the only abortion clinic in the state open because of what he described as health and safety deficiencies in the St. Louis facility.

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& # 39; Under these circumstances, no judge should give special treatment to Planned Parenthood & # 39 ;, Parson said during a live press conference from his office in Jefferson City.

His comments came on the same day that Planned Parenthood had to be pronounced in court because of a lawsuit against the state that the organization had announced Tuesday.

Planned Parenthood officials said they may have been forced to stop granting abortions at the St. Louis facility because the state threatens not to renew its license to perform abortions. The license expires Friday.

If it is not extended, the organization says that Missouri would be the first state without a functioning abortion clinic since Roe v. Wade Supreme Court's decision of 1973.

In this photo of May 17, 2019, abortion opponent Teresa Pettis, right, greets a passerby outside the Planned Parenthood clinic in St. Louis. Planned Parenthood says that Missouri & # 39; s only abortion clinic might be closed at the end of the week because the state threatens not to renew its license, which expires Friday May 31

In this photo of May 17, 2019, abortion opponent Teresa Pettis, right, greets a passerby outside the Planned Parenthood clinic in St. Louis. Planned Parenthood says that Missouri & # 39; s only abortion clinic might be closed at the end of the week because the state threatens not to renew its license, which expires Friday May 31

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Parson outlined a number of serious concerns during the press conference, including reports of three failed abortions by the Planned Parenthood facility.

& # 39; These failed abortions also include patients returning to Planned Parenthood after they realized they were still pregnant & # 39 ;, Parson said. & # 39; In another case, a patient was taken to a hospital in an ambulance. & # 39;

Planned Parenthood officials did not immediately provide a note to DailyMail.com.

Parson had strong words for Planned Parenthood and noted that the organization & # 39; ample time & # 39; has had to address the concerns of the state health department. He also objected to the fact that five out of seven doctors at the facility refused to be interviewed as part of attempts to align with the state agency.

& # 39; The issues we are discussing are centered around two main themes: Planned Parenthood does not follow the law and Planned Parenthood does not protect women's health & # 39 ;, Parson said.

& # 39; Regardless of whether you support abortion or not, Planned Parenthood must be able to meet the basic levels of security, & # 39; he added.

Parson said that Planned Parenthood may still be able to meet Friday's deadline.

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According to the lawsuit, the state health department visited the clinic in April to investigate a patient's complaint.

Planned Parenthood says that the agency did not specify the complaint, but said the subsequent investigation identified a large number of potential defective practices that require explanation from physicians directly involved in patient care, as well as treating physicians. & # 39;

The lawsuit says the state wanted to interview seven doctors, including medical guys who no longer provide care at the clinic. It says that two staff doctors agreed, but the others did not, and Planned Parenthood cannot force them because they are not staffs.

Any stalemate compared to interviews is significant because according to the lawsuit, the health department will not decide to extend the Planned Parenthood license until the investigation is completed.

Missouri is half a dozen states that have withstood radical anti-abortion measures. Parson signed a bill on Friday against abortions on or after the eighth week of pregnancy, with the exception of rape or incest.

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Under the law of Missouri, which comes into force on August 28, doctors who violate the eight-week cut-out can be in prison for five to fifteen years. Women who end their pregnancy cannot be prosecuted.

If the St. Louis clinic can no longer offer abortions, the closest clinics that perform abortions are in a suburb of Kansas City and in Granite City, Illinois, across the Mississippi River from St. Louis. The Kansas Clinic is approximately 300 km from St. Louis.

& # 39; While the state of Missouri is waging a war against its abortion services and suppliers, the Hope Clinic remains committed to patients in Missouri, & # 39; said Erin King, executive director of the Granite City clinic, in a statement.

Wen said Missouri has illegally armed the licensing process.

Colleen McNicholas, an OB-GYN at the Planned Parenthood office in St. Louis, called it the & # 39; natural consequence of several decades of limitation after limitation & # 39 ;.

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& # 39; This is exactly what we have warned about & # 39 ;, McNicholas said.

Alabama & # 39; s governor signed a bill on May 15 and in almost all cases did abortion as a crime. Supporters have said they are trying to provoke a legal challenge that will eventually force the Supreme Court to visit Roe v. Wade again.

Unlike the almost complete abortion ban in Alabama, lawmakers who helped draft the Missouri law said they are meant to deal with legal issues rather than provoke them. If the eight-week ban is concluded, the invoice contains a ladder with less restrictive time limits at 14, 18 or 20 weeks.

The Missouri law also contains an absolute ban on abortions, except in cases of medical emergencies, but that would only succeed if Roe v. Wade was destroyed. Missouri Right to Life called it & # 39; the strongest pro-life account in the history of Missouri & # 39 ;.

Kentucky, Mississippi, Ohio and Georgia also have an approved ban on abortions as soon as fetal heart activity can be detected, which can occur around the sixth week of pregnancy. Some of those laws have already been challenged in court and similar restrictions in North Dakota and Iowa have been crushed by judges.

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Even before the latest legislation, Missouri already had some of the most restrictive abortion regulations in the nation, including the requirement that physicians who perform abortions have partnerships with nearby hospitals.

A total of 2,910 abortions took place in Missouri in 2018, according to preliminary data from the National Health Service. This includes 433 abortions after eight weeks of pregnancy and 267 after six weeks or earlier.

The burst of new legislation has made abortion providers in some states uncertain about what they can do now, and McNicholas said that there is & # 39; a huge amount of confusion & # 39; is among women who come to the clinic for planned parenting.

In the meantime, the American Civil Liberties Union of Missouri is looking for a state-wide vote on the new Missouri Abortion Law. The ACLU said Tuesday that it has submitted a referendum petition to the State Secretary's office as a first step to blocking and possibly repealing the law. The group wants to force a referendum in 2020.

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