The governor aligned with Trump with hope says he will allow someone else to certify whether he won or not.

Trump's ally, Kris Kobach, the Kansas secretary of state, leads at approximately 0.004 percent in his governor's primary race; has decided to withdraw from the responsibility of his work to certify what will be an inevitable recount

Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach said Thursday night that following a request by his opponent in the governor's primaries on Tuesday, he will delegate his responsibility to oversee an inevitable recount of votes at the state level.

The conservative supported by Trump has a slim advantage of 121 votes against the current Republican Party governor, Jeff Colyer, a surprisingly small margin in a race in which more than 311,000 Republicans cast their vote.

That could change when officials count between 8,000 and 10,000 provisional ballots, which are usually issued when voters show up at the wrong polling place or try to vote in person after requesting absentee ballots.

No matter which candidate finishes at the top, it will be close enough to allow the loser to request a recount. And after saying on Wednesday on the Fox News channel that he had no objection to letting someone else certify the result, he said a day later on CNN that he would take the "symbolic" step.

"It really does not make sense to do it, because the secretary of state does not really have any role in counting the provisional ballots, nor in any recount," Kobach said. "But I said that if my opponent wants to do it, I'd be happy to do it."

Trump's ally, Kris Kobach, the Kansas secretary of state, leads at approximately 0.004 percent in his governor's primary race; has decided to withdraw from the responsibility of his work to certify what will be an inevitable recount

Trump's ally, Kris Kobach, the Kansas secretary of state, leads at approximately 0.004 percent in his governor's primary race; has decided to withdraw from the responsibility of his work to certify what will be an inevitable recount

Kansas Governor Jeff Colyer is struggling to avoid being swept by the more conservative Kobach; it will be days before the race is fixed, and its deficit of 121 votes could easily disappear

Kansas Governor Jeff Colyer is struggling to avoid being swept by the more conservative Kobach; it will be days before the race is fixed, and its deficit of 121 votes could easily disappear

Kansas Governor Jeff Colyer is struggling to avoid being swept by the more conservative Kobach; it will be days before the race is fixed, and its deficit of 121 votes could easily disappear

Kobach leads by 0.004 percent after Tuesday's primaries; as secretary of state of Kansas, he would be in charge of certifying the recount, but now he is recusing himself of that duty

Kobach leads by 0.004 percent after Tuesday's primaries; as secretary of state of Kansas, he would be in charge of certifying the recount, but now he is recusing himself of that duty

Kobach leads by 0.004 percent after Tuesday's primaries; as secretary of state of Kansas, he would be in charge of certifying the recount, but now he is recusing himself of that duty

& # 39; It's purely symbolic & # 39; added, & # 39; I do not believe [Colyer] understands the process. "

Kobach had told Fox that the counts are carried out by county election officials: "All the Secretary of State does is simply receive the numbers from the counties … [but] If my opponent insists that he do it, for the numbers to be sent to another person, we can certainly do that. "

Trump's ally has not said if he is going to deny himself to decide the possible price tag for a vote counting count.

If the margin ends closer to 0.5 percent, a total of 1,555 votes at this time, the state will pay for it.

And if the result were returned, the candidate who issued the challenge would not be on the hook for the expense, no matter how broad the margin to begin with.

But if Colyer ended up losing by more than 0.5 percent, Kobach would be responsible for getting a bonus from his opponent to cover the costs in case he lost a second time.

Kobach could also name that price.

Electoral attorney Mark Johnson told The Kansas City Star that Kobach should not decide that. That's a conflict, in my opinion.

"I could establish the link so high that nobody could afford that," Johnson explained.

Kobach told Fox News on Wednesday that there is no reason for him to reject the counting procedure that could ultimately benefit him, but he said a day later that he would take the symbolic step. anyway

Kobach told Fox News on Wednesday that there is no reason for him to reject the counting procedure that could ultimately benefit him, but he said a day later that he would take the symbolic step. anyway

Kobach told Fox News on Wednesday that there is no reason for him to reject the counting procedure that could ultimately benefit him, but he said a day later that he would take the symbolic step. anyway

No matter the circumstances, a recount could take weeks. That will give Democratic nominee Laura Kelly, state senator, an advantage in November.

But the eventual Republican candidate will have a natural advantage in the deep red state: Republicans outnumbered Democrats more than 2 to 1 at the polls on Tuesday.

Kobach's lead in the tight race was 191 after Tuesday night, but election officials in two counties have revised their numbers. One gave Colyer 100 votes that were originally denied. Recalculations of the other extended edge of Kobach by 30.

No Kansas law requires Kobach to step aside and delegate the establishment of bonuses and certification of votes to a deputy.

And although Kobach acknowledged that he can finish in second place, he plans to start fighting Kelly immediately.

"It is imperative that we start running, understanding that this is a tentative victory," he told the Star, "and that I take the baton for this first week with the full knowledge that I can hand the cane to Jeff if the provisional ballots they change the result & # 39;

President Donald Trump left no doubt about his inclinations on Monday, disregarding the advice of the advisors and tweeting that Kobach had his "total and total approval".

Kobach won the backing of President Donald Trump on Monday in the Republican primary governor contest

Kobach won the backing of President Donald Trump on Monday in the Republican primary governor contest

Kobach won the backing of President Donald Trump on Monday in the Republican primary governor contest

Trump, photographed last week at a rally in Pennsylvania, is loyal to Kobach, who was in the race to be Secretary of Homeland Security; But members of the Republican Party fear that the rightist may lose to a Democrat in November

Trump, photographed last week at a rally in Pennsylvania, is loyal to Kobach, who was in the race to be Secretary of Homeland Security; But members of the Republican Party fear that the rightist may lose to a Democrat in November

Trump, photographed last week at a rally in Pennsylvania, is loyal to Kobach, who was in the race to be Secretary of Homeland Security; But members of the Republican Party fear that the rightist may lose to a Democrat in November

The president said this week that Kobach had his "complete and total approval" & # 39;

The president said this week that Kobach had his "complete and total approval" & # 39;

The president said this week that Kobach had his "complete and total approval" & # 39;

Kobach headed the 2017 Presidential Electoral Fraud Committee, which dissolved in January after failing to identify any evidence to support the claim following Trump's election that millions of people had voted illegally.

He had not wasted his time at the end of 2016 by backing Trump's unsubstantiated claim that "millions" of people had illegally cast votes for Hillary Clinton.

This year, the self-proclaimed crusader of the purity of the ballots attracted a more direct rejection of the same problem in his home state.

A federal judge brought him to the brink in March for his defense of a state law that requires Kansans to prove he was a US citizen before registering to vote.

That was in conflict with the federal 1993 "motor voter" law, which allows voter registration wherever driver's licenses are issued, without any additional paperwork.

A ruling by the federal court of appeals in 2016 overturned similar requirements in three states.

The American Civil Liberties Union and the League of Women Voters have successfully argued before the courts that proving US citizenship during voter registration prevents some eligible voters from exercising their franchise.

At this year's trial, Kobach could only prove that 11 people cast their votes successfully despite not being US citizens. UU

The lightning rod politician insisted before the court that it was only the "tip of the iceberg". Chief District Judge Julie A. Robinson called it an "icicle" instead.

A month later, Kobach failed to meet Robinson's deadline of two years before, by not sending postcards to eligible voters who had been prevented from registering because they did not prove they were citizens.

The ruling of United States District Judge Julie Robinson (pictured) is the latest setback for Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach

The ruling of United States District Judge Julie Robinson (pictured) is the latest setback for Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach

Kobach (pictured) has defended those laws and led the now defunct electoral fraud commission of President Donald Trump

Kobach (pictured) has defended those laws and led the now defunct electoral fraud commission of President Donald Trump

US District Judge Julie Robinson (left) handed one legal setback after another to Kobach in a case about whether the state could require potential voters to prove when they register that they are legal citizens of the United States. UU

Kobach became a national punchline a few weeks after the 2016 election when he left a meeting with Trump and allowed the photographers to see the policy proposals under his left arm.

Kobach became a national punchline a few weeks after the 2016 election when he left a meeting with Trump and allowed the photographers to see the policy proposals under his left arm.

Kobach became a national punchline a few weeks after the 2016 election when he left a meeting with Trump and allowed the photographers to see the policy proposals under his left arm.

The document showed a lot of ideas on border security along with a proposal to amend the National Voting Rights Act to demand proof of citizenship in the future.

The document showed a lot of ideas on border security along with a proposal to amend the National Voting Rights Act to demand proof of citizenship in the future.

The document showed a lot of ideas on border security along with a proposal to amend the National Voting Rights Act to demand proof of citizenship in the future.

Robinson held him in contempt of court, closing the book in one of a series of unforced errors. Last week, he fined him more than $ 26,000 to cover the legal fees of the ACLU in arguing the contempt motion.

Kobach, an attorney educated at Yale and a former law professor who represented his own office at the trial, had tried to present some evidence in court that he had not shared with his opponents; and others that the judge had ordered could not be shown.

He also filed a report without removing a side note that one of his claims was "probably not worth discussing".

This time, Robinson ordered him to take 6 hours of corrective legal education on procedural rules or federal or Kansas civilian evidence.

She had already fined him $ 1,000 in 2017 for confusing her about the nature of a document being photographed carrying under her arm after a meeting with the then-elected Trump just weeks after the election, at a time when he was being investigated to head the Department of Homeland Security.

One of Kobach's written proposals to Trump read: & # 39; Draft amendments to [the] National voter registration law to promote proof of citizenship requirements & # 39;

Only the first five words were visible in the news photos. Robinson finally demanded the document and saw the full context.

In her final decision, a painful defeat for Kobach, she criticized him for having a "well documented history of avoiding the orders of this Court".

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