The founder of Woodstock remembers how the iconic three-day festival changed American culture

& # 39; It wasn't just a concert, it was a revolution! & # 39; Woodstock founder remembers how the iconic three-day festival changed American culture into the new ABC special on the occasion of the 50-year anniversary

  • Generation Woodstock is a new ABC documentary that will be broadcast on Tuesday at 10 p.m. and has been in existence for 50 years since the iconic music festival
  • The three-day concert with performances by Janis Joplin and Jimi Hendrix is ‚Äč‚Äčremembered as a provocative show of love and equality
  • Generation Woodstock is also investigating the impact of The Stonewall riots – the striking LGBTQ event that also took place in the summer of 1969
  • Transgender activists, including Laverne Cox from Orange Is The New Black, pay tribute to queer heroes who defended their rights

Woodstock is praised as the musical festival that changed American cultural history into a new documentary that will be broadcast on ABC on Tuesday evening at eight o'clock in the evening.

Generation Woodstock marks 50 years after the turning point event, with interviews with Michael Lang and Artie Kornfeld, the duo who planned the three-day concert when they were just in their mid-twenties.

In a sneak preview of the TV special, Lang, now 74, says the extravagant event – held in August 1969 – was an explosive reaction to the political malaise that the hippie generation had felt over the course of the decade.

Disillusioned by the Vietnam War, the opposition to civil rights and the murders of President Kennedy and Martin Luther King Jr., 400,000 young Americans moved to Bethel, New York, to show their love for equality and freedom, as well as sex, drugs and rock & # 39 ; n & # 39; roll.

& # 39; The best political statement we could make is that it worked, & # 39; Lang can be seen in a new preview of the show.

A new ABC special entitled Generation Woodstock looks at how the three-day music festival influenced American culture

A new ABC special entitled Generation Woodstock looks at how the three-day music festival influenced American culture

Woodstock, co-founder Michael Lang, is interviewed in the ABC special and recalls the iconic event

Woodstock, co-founder Michael Lang, is interviewed in the ABC special and recalls the iconic event

Woodstock, co-founder Michael Lang, is interviewed in the ABC special and recalls the iconic event

He and Kornfeld – who also appear in the documentary – said they hoped 200,000 people would attend the event.

But more than twice the number shown to listen to artists, including Joan Baez, the Grateful Dead, Janis Joplin and Jimi Hendrix.

The three-day love-in – complete with tie-dye t-shirts, mudflows and ample amounts of marijuana – marked a drastic change in American youth culture, which was previously knotted and very conservative.

& # 39; It wasn't just a concert, it was a revolution! & # 39; an interviewee from the documentary explains.

Tariq Trotter, a member of triple Grammy-winning band The Roots, also appears in the documentary and discusses how the event affected his own career.

400,000 turned out to listen to artists such as Joan Baez, the Grateful Dead, Janis Joplin and Jimi Hendrix

400,000 turned out to listen to artists such as Joan Baez, the Grateful Dead, Janis Joplin and Jimi Hendrix

400,000 turned out to listen to artists such as Joan Baez, the Grateful Dead, Janis Joplin and Jimi Hendrix

The three-day love-in - complete with tie-dye t-shirts, mud flows and ample amounts of marijuana - marked a drastic change in American youth culture

The three-day love-in - complete with tie-dye t-shirts, mud flows and ample amounts of marijuana - marked a drastic change in American youth culture

The three-day love-in – complete with tie-dye t-shirts, mud flows and ample amounts of marijuana – marked a drastic change in American youth culture

Generation Woodstock is also investigating the Stonewall riots – another culture-changing event that took place in the summer of 1969.

The riots, which were held in response to a police raid in a gay bar in Greenwich Village in New York, are generally regarded as a catalyst for the LGBTQ liberation movement.

& # 39; I am here because they had the courage to fight back & # 39 ;, says transgender activist and Orange Is The New Black, Laverne Cox in a preview of the show.

Stonewall and Woodstock took place within just a few weeks of each other, and marked the start of a more indulgent phase of youth culture.

As one interviewee in the documentary explains: & # 39; It was an entire generation that exploded into day-glo color and America changed forever & # 39 ;.

Generation Woodstock broadcast 10 / 9c on ABC

Generation Woodstock investigates the Stonewall riots - another culture-changing event that took place in the summer of 1969

Generation Woodstock investigates the Stonewall riots - another culture-changing event that took place in the summer of 1969

Generation Woodstock investigates the Stonewall riots – another culture-changing event that took place in the summer of 1969

Transgender activist and Orange Is The New Black star Laverne Cox can be seen in the program

Transgender activist and Orange Is The New Black star Laverne Cox can be seen in the program

Transgender activist and Orange Is The New Black star Laverne Cox can be seen in the program

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