The Florida high school footballer who has collapsed on the field is taken away from his livelihood

A football player in Florida high school who collapsed in the middle of a match is & # 39; brain-dead & # 39; declared and is taken from living.

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Jacquez Welch, a senior and team captain at northeastern high school in St. Petersburg, picked up an opponent during a Friday night game.

After he did not get up, he was rushed to Bayfront Health – six miles away – where doctors discovered he had a pre-existing condition that caused serious bleeding in his brain after a jumble of blood vessels bursting.

On Monday, the family of the 17-year-old decided to take him from living. His organs will be given, saving seven lives.

& # 39; Quez was a giving person, & # 39; told his mother, Marcia Nelson, a congregation in Gateway Baptist Church, according to the Tampa Bay Times.

& # 39; He would give it to anyone if he had it. He wanted to do this. & # 39;

Jacquez Welch, 17 (photo), a football captain at the northeastern high school in St. Petersburg, Florida, collapsed after tackling an opponent during a Friday night game

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Jacquez Welch, 17 (photo), a football captain at the northeastern high school in St. Petersburg, Florida, collapsed after tackling an opponent during a Friday night game

Paramedics rushed Welch to the hospital, where the diagnosis of cerebral arterial malformation was made

Paramedics rushed Welch to the hospital, where the diagnosis of cerebral arterial malformation was made

AVMs occur when there is an abnormal jumble of arteries and veins that can lead to bleeding. Pictured: Welch

AVMs occur when there is an abnormal jumble of arteries and veins that can lead to bleeding. Pictured: Welch

Paramedics rushed Welch (left and right) to the hospital, where the diagnosis of cerebral arterial malformation was made. AVM & # 39; s occur when there is an abnormal jumble of arteries and veins that can lead to bleeding

Nelson told me WFTS that she was watching the match in the stands when the incident occurred.

She did not know the situation was serious until one of his coaches told her to take the field. She emphasized that it was not the football that caused his death.

& # 39; There is nothing anyone could have done to prevent this, & # 39; Nelson said to the station.

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& # 39; The doctors told me that this would have happened, whether he was playing in the field or not … It's unfair. Why him? & # 39;

Welch was diagnosed with arteriovenous malformation (AVM), which occurs when there is a jumble of blood vessels with abnormal connections between arteries and veins.

Normally, blood vessels carry oxygen-rich blood from the heart to the brain, while veins carry oxygen-poor blood from the brain to the heart.

But with AVM, blood flows very quickly and directly from the arteries to the veins, bypassing normal brain tissue.

This can cause the small blood vessels to dilate over time and possibly burst due to the high pressure of blood flow from the arteries.

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The cause of AVM's is unknown, but it was believed that it would occur during fetal development. It can go unnoticed for years.

It is estimated that AVMs occur in the brain in less than 1 percent of the general population and affect men in particular, according to the American Stroke Association.

Northeast High School won 41-0 and after the game the whole team went to Welch in the hospital. Pictured: Welch, right, and his team during a pregame ceremony on Friday night with the sweater of a player who was murdered to his family

Northeast High School won 41-0 and after the game the whole team went to Welch in the hospital. Pictured: Welch, right, and his team during a pregame ceremony on Friday night with the sweater of a player who was murdered to his family

Northeast High School won 41-0 and after the game the whole team went to Welch in the hospital. Pictured: Welch, right, and his team during a pregame ceremony on Friday night with the sweater of a player who was murdered to his family

Welch (photo) became & # 39; brain-dead & # 39; declared and his family chose to deprive him of living

Welch (photo) became & # 39; brain-dead & # 39; declared and his family chose to deprive him of living

His organs will be donated, saving at least seven lives. Pictured: Welch
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His organs will be donated, saving at least seven lives. Pictured: Welch

Welch (left and right) became & # 39; brain-dead & # 39; declared and his family chose to deprive him of living. His organs will be donated, saving at least seven lives

There is no cure and the treatment consists of controlling symptoms and preventing complications such as bleeding.

According to the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, about four in every 100 people with AVM have bleeding every year.

The bleeding comes with a risk of 15 to 20 percent stroke or death.

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After Northeast won 41-0, the whole team reportedly visited Welch in the ICU.

His coach, Jeremy Frioud, told the Times that Welch has good grades – a 4.0 GPA – and received his first scholarship offer to play football at Concordia College in Minnesota.

He also organized one GoFundMe page to cover the costs of Welch's funeral expenses. Starting Tuesday morning, more than $ 14,000 was raised from a $ 25,000 goal.

This is not the first time that Northeast High School has experienced the tragic death of a student.

A few days earlier, former Vikings player, Marquis Scott, was shot and killed while cycling. Welch helped for hours to present a framed sweater to Scott's family before it collapsed.

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