A member of the expedition relaxes with his pipe while the vertiginous and threatening peaks of the mountains loom in the background

The newly discovered images reveal the extraordinary courage of George Mallory's expedition to Mount Everest in 1921.

The digitized images, recently restored, are part of a collection featuring World War I veteran Mallory and his robust team of adventurers who made history in 1921 as part of the first British reconnaissance expedition to the highest peak in the world.

In the first image you can see an intrepid explorer sitting thoughtfully on a mound of snow with his hat on and taking a puff on his pipe, with the vertiginous mountains looming in the background.

Mallory, who would return to the mountain twice more, and fellow climber Guy Bullock, advanced 23,000 feet up the mountain through the North Column in the northern Everest range, before the atrocious winds forced them to retreat.

A member of the expedition relaxes with his pipe while the vertiginous and threatening peaks of the mountains loom in the background

A member of the expedition relaxes with his pipe while the vertiginous and threatening peaks of the mountains loom in the background

Three goalkeepers climbing a ridge. The team that participated in the expedition was quite ill prepared for modern climbing standards. You can see the porters grabbing ropes, with them tied around their waist and rudimentary climbing equipment.

Three goalkeepers climbing a ridge. The team that participated in the expedition was quite ill prepared for modern climbing standards. You can see the porters grabbing ropes, with them tied around their waist and rudimentary climbing equipment.

Three goalkeepers climbing a ridge. The team that participated in the expedition was quite ill prepared for modern climbing standards. You can see the porters grabbing ropes, with them tied around their waist and rudimentary climbing equipment.

The 1921 group, led by Charles Howard-Bury, was quite ill prepared for modern climbing standards.

They had no oxygen equipment and the physical fitness levels in the group, which were mostly fifty years old, were deficient and the equipment was rudimentary.

Mallory wrote to Ruth, his wife, in June 1921 saying they were about to "get off the map."

When the mountain finally came into view, according to The Times, he wrote: "The problem of its great ridges and glaciers began to take shape and torment the mind."

This photo is titled & # 39; George Mallory climbing like a spider & # 39; You can see it at the top of the snap climbing the great height.

This photo is titled & # 39; George Mallory climbing like a spider & # 39; You can see it at the top of the snap climbing the great height.

This photo is titled & # 39; George Mallory climbing like a spider & # 39; You can see it at the top of the snap climbing the great height.

The photographs were restored by Salto Ulbeek Studio in Belgium for the Royal Geographical Society.

They will be exhibited at a free exhibition in London starting on October 29.

Despite being forced to turn back, Mallory did not surrender and would return to the mountain in 1922 in an attempt to conquer the world's highest peak.

The 1922 expedition is considered the first ascent on the highest mountain in the world and was the first to use bottled oxygen to assist mountaineers as they approached the peak of 29,000 feet.

But the trip ended in tragedy when, on their third attempt to reach the top, the group was hit by an avalanche and seven men died.

The group had some success, becoming the first climbers to surpass 26,000 feet, the first to use oxygen bottles, paving the way for future attempts and the first to obtain high quality photos near the top.

Mallory participated in three expeditions to Everest.

The first, in 1921, was a reconnaissance expedition to assess whether a route could be found on the north side of the mountain.

The south side was not an option because Nepal was closed to Westerners.

When a route was discovered, Mallory returned the following year with a team led by Charles Bruce and Edward Lisle Strutt, along with more than 100 Tibetan and Nepalese porters.

After establishing a base camp, the group made three attempts at the summit.

The first, performed without using oxygen, reached a world record of 26,985 feet. The second, with oxygen, reached 27,316 feet before Bruce had a problem with his oxygen mask.

Team doctors warned against a third attempt because many of the group were exhausted or ill. But he went ahead and the team was hit by an avalanche.

On the right you can see the explorers camping at approximately 20,000 feet. George Mallory would end up making three trips to Everest and dying in 1924

On the right you can see the explorers camping at approximately 20,000 feet. George Mallory would end up making three trips to Everest and dying in 1924

On the right you can see the explorers camping at approximately 20,000 feet. George Mallory would end up making three trips to Everest and dying in 1924

Three members of the team that descend from the Karpo Riwo, in front of the Kama Valley. Some of the images show the deep snow and the treacherous conditions that the climbers faced

Three members of the team that descend from the Karpo Riwo, in front of the Kama Valley. Some of the images show the deep snow and the treacherous conditions that the climbers faced

Three members of the team that descend from the Karpo Riwo, in front of the Kama Valley. Some of the images show the deep snow and the treacherous conditions that the climbers faced

The group takes a well-deserved rest and plans their next move. Mallory had another failed attempt in 1922, before returning in 1924 after raising funds. He died along with fellow climber Andrew & # 39; Sandy & # 39; Irvine and their bodies were not found until 1999

The group takes a well-deserved rest and plans their next move. Mallory had another failed attempt in 1922, before returning in 1924 after raising funds. He died along with fellow climber Andrew & # 39; Sandy & # 39; Irvine and their bodies were not found until 1999

The group takes a well-deserved rest and plans their next move. Mallory had another failed attempt in 1922, before returning in 1924 after raising funds. He died along with fellow climber Andrew & # 39; Sandy & # 39; Irvine and their bodies were not found until 1999

An image showing the view from the camp at 22,500 feet showing Everest, North Col and North Peak, looking west

An image showing the view from the camp at 22,500 feet showing Everest, North Col and North Peak, looking west

An image showing the view from the camp at 22,500 feet showing Everest, North Col and North Peak, looking west

Nine loaders fell into a crevice and were buried under the snow. Two loaders were unearthed, but seven others died.

After the tragedy, Mallory toured the United Kingdom and the United States and, using the data his group had obtained, raised funds for another expedition in 1924, which reached 900 feet from the summit.

Mallory and his fellow climber Andrew & # 39; Sandy & # 39; Irvine died during the 1924 expedition and their bodies were not found until 1999.

Some still believe that they may have reached the peak before they died. Edmund Hillary and the climber Sherpa Tenzing Norgay are the first climbers who are credited with reaching the top in 1953.

In addition to obtaining impressive photos of the snowy mountains, the climbers also obtained photos of these Tibetan monks and the abbot of the Shekar Chote monastery

In addition to obtaining impressive photos of the snowy mountains, the climbers also obtained photos of these Tibetan monks and the abbot of the Shekar Chote monastery

In addition to obtaining impressive photos of the snowy mountains, the climbers also obtained photos of these Tibetan monks and the abbot of the Shekar Chote monastery

George Mallory the intrepid explorer of Everest.

George Mallory (pictured right) was born in 1886 in Mobberley, Cheshire, and grew up in Hobcroft House.

He learned his mountaineering skills by climbing the roof and climbing the chimneys of the property during his childhood.

He continued to participate in the first three British expeditions to Mount Everest in the early 1920s.

During the British expedition to Mount Everest in 1924, he and his climbing partner Andrew & # 39; Sandy & # 39; Irvine disappeared on the northeast ridge when trying to ascend for the first time to the highest mountain in the world.

The pair was last seen when they were about 800 feet (245 m) from the top.

Mallory's final destination remained unknown for 75 years, until his body was discovered on May 1, 1999 by an expedition that had set out to find the remains of the climbers.

If Mallory and Irvine reached the top of Everest before they died, it's still a research topic.

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