The Firefox test feature suggests articles based on the websites you visit

Firefox has launched a feature that predicts which sites you may like based on your web history. Suggestions are displayed in a sidebar in your browser (left)

Use Mozilla Firefox? You should be careful with what you are looking for!

The popular browser is testing a new feature that tracks users' web history to recommend articles based on themes or trends in their online habits.

The feature, which is currently being tested by the company, is only available as a browser add-on at the moment.

With the name Avance, the function uses AI to find common topics in the list of websites it has visited and uses them to recommend new articles in a designated sidebar.

For example, if you have recently clicked on a large number of websites, articles and social media posts about football, the bot can recommend a news about a key transfer.

But those who frequent sites for adults or not safe for work should be careful, since the technology will publish sites of the same ilk in the sidebar.

Firefox said the goal is to create a "personalized feed" of web pages and stories that users could never otherwise find.

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Firefox has launched a feature that predicts which sites you may like based on your web history. Suggestions are displayed in a sidebar in your browser (left)

Firefox has launched a feature that predicts which sites you may like based on your web history. Suggestions are displayed in a sidebar in your browser (left)

Mozilla, the software group behind Firefox, launched Advance around the world yesterday.

The new add-on can be downloaded from the company's Test Pilot website, where it presents new features that are currently under test.

Firefox users will have the ability to block and flag all recommended items that they do not like, in order to improve the AI's ability to customize the previews.

In a statement on its website, Mozilla said: "Advance offers real-time recommendations to its Firefox sidebar while browsing.

& # 39; Advance uses your current navigation to suggest related news and similar pages to read below, and uses your browsing history to create a customized source of quality content. & # 39;

The function uses the machine learning technology of the American company Laserlike to detect common issues in a person's browsing history.

For the sake of online privacy, Mozilla said it has implemented a series of protective measures to protect people's personal data.

The For You section of the sidebar shows the recommended content for you based on your recent browsing history (left)

The For You section of the sidebar shows the recommended content for you based on your recent browsing history (left)

The For You section of the sidebar shows the recommended content for you based on your recent browsing history (left)

The browser add-on, called Advance, uses AI to find common themes on their favorite web pages and use them to recommend new articles in a sidebar. The Advance sidebar is updated with the new For You recommendations when you open a new tab (in the photo)

The browser add-on, called Advance, uses AI to find common themes on their favorite web pages and use them to recommend new articles in a sidebar. The Advance sidebar is updated with the new For You recommendations when you open a new tab (in the photo)

The browser add-on, called Advance, uses AI to find common themes on their favorite web pages and use them to recommend new articles in a sidebar. The Advance sidebar is updated with the new For You recommendations when you open a new tab (in the photo)

People who frequent pornographic sites or other adult sites should be careful, since the technology will publish similar sites in its sidebar

People who frequent pornographic sites or other adult sites should be careful, since the technology will publish similar sites in its sidebar

People who frequent pornographic sites or other adult sites should be careful, since the technology will publish similar sites in its sidebar

Firefox will have the ability to stop the experiment, as well as being able to review the collected data and delete them on the Laserlike side.

Firefox is the second most popular web browser in the world, behind Google Chrome.

It limits Internet Explorer, Safari, Edge and Opera with a market share of around 13 percent.

The last feature could convince some users to abandon Chrome and choose the Mozilla platform.

It is a slight deviation from the norm for Firefox since previous Test Pilots tend to focus on browser functionality, rather than completely new functions.

WHAT ARE THE MOST POPULAR WEB NAVIGANTS?

Web browsers allow users to access the Internet and often have different functionalities and features.

According to the figure of StatCounter between July 2008 and January 2018, the most popular platforms, based on successes, are:

1. Chrome ~ 64 percent

2. Firefox ~ 13 percent

3. Internet Explorer ~ 10 percent

4. Safari ~ 5 percent

5. Border ~ 4 percent

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