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A lab technician's finger started to rot after she accidentally injected herself into the finger with smallpox-related virus while experimenting with mice (pictured 54 days after the accident)

The finger of a laboratory worker turns BLACK and starts to rot after accidentally injecting herself with a smallpox-related virus during an experiment with mice

  • The 26-year-old's finger started to rot after she had injected herself with the vaccinia virus
  • Woman from San Diego received vaccination before she started working in the laboratory
  • But she rejected it because she underestimated how harmful infections can be
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A lab technician's finger started to rot after she accidentally injected herself with a smallpox-related virus while experimenting with mice.

The 26-year-old's finger went black and a cat-filled blister developed at the injection site while the infection destroyed the tip of her index finger.

The unknown woman from San Diego had accidentally stung herself with a needle while injecting vaccinia virus mice as part of the experiment.

Vaccinia virus is closely related to smallpox but less harmful. It does not cause smallpox but it is used to make the vaccine for the virus.

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A lab technician's finger started to rot after she accidentally injected herself into the finger with smallpox-related virus while experimenting with mice (pictured 54 days after the accident)

A lab technician's finger started to rot after she accidentally injected herself into the finger with smallpox-related virus while experimenting with mice (pictured 54 days after the accident)

The 26-year-old's finger went black and a crust filled with a cat developed at the injection site when the infection destroyed the tip of her index finger (pictured after 25 days)

The 26-year-old's finger went black and a crust filled with a cat developed at the injection site when the infection destroyed the tip of her index finger (pictured after 25 days)

The 26-year-old's finger went black and a crust filled with a cat developed at the injection site when the infection destroyed the tip of her index finger (pictured after 25 days)

Doctors gave her a treatment with antiviral drugs tecovirimat for fourteen days, along with antibiotics to prevent a bacterial infection in her wound. Here it is depicted on the better hand after 94 days

Doctors gave her a treatment with antiviral drugs tecovirimat for fourteen days, along with antibiotics to prevent a bacterial infection in her wound. Here it is depicted on the better hand after 94 days

Doctors gave her a treatment with antiviral drugs tecovirimat for fourteen days, along with antibiotics to prevent a bacterial infection in her wound. Here it is depicted on the better hand after 94 days

Immediately after the accident, she flushed her finger with water for 15 minutes before being rushed to A&E.

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About 10 days later, the lab technician's finger had become balloon-shaped and a green blister had formed on the tip. It became more and more itchy and she got a fever.

When her symptoms did not disappear by day 12, doctors put her on a course of antiviral drugs tecovirimat for fourteen days, along with antibiotics to prevent a bacterial infection in her wound.

She also received a single dose of vaccinia immune globulin, which consists of antibodies from people who have already been vaccinated against the disease.

On day 11, the tip of her finger burst and developed a cat-filled blister. She was also affected by a fever

On day 11, the tip of her finger burst and developed a cat-filled blister. She was also affected by a fever

On day 11, the tip of her finger burst and developed a cat-filled blister. She was also affected by a fever

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Within two days after the treatment, the woman's fever had disappeared and the pain and swelling had largely disappeared.

But patches of dead tissue on her finger did not heal completely for more than three months. She couldn't go to work at the time.

The story was revealed in the diary Weekly report on morbidity and mortality, issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The report claimed that she was offered the smallpox vaccine before she started working with vaccinia, but she refused.

She rejected it because she & # 39; did not appreciate the extent of the infection & # 39 ;, doctors revealed.

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The woman was also put off by the thought that she had to control the possible side effects of the injection.

SMALLPOX: THE HISTORY OF THE KILLER VIRUS

  • The first known victim of smallpox was Pharaoh Ramses V of Egypt, who died in 1157BC and whose mummy still bears the scars of the disease.
  • When the Spaniards took it to Hispaniola – now Haiti and the Dominican Republic – which they established for sugar cane plantation in 1509, it killed each of the 2.5 million residents within a decade.
  • More than 200 years ago, physician Edward Jenner made a crucial discovery that led to the first vaccine. He discovered that milkmaids who developed cowpox by working close to the animals day after day, seemed to be protected against smallpox, the human form of the disease.
  • In Great Britain the disease was endemic until 1935.
  • The last major outbreak in Europe was in 1972 when 20 million were vaccinated after a pilgrim returning from Mecca to Yugoslavia infected 175 people.
  • Doctors conducted a vaccination campaign to eradicate smallpox, which was successful in the late 1970s.
  • All countries were asked to destroy the stocks of the virus or to transfer it to heavily protected installations in the US or Russia. It is feared that terrorists received supplies from Russia in the 1980s.

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