The fierce 90 mph winds from Hurricane Florence spin the wheel of fortune

The winds of Hurricane Florence were so fierce that they caused a wheel of fortune to turn continuously in Virginia

The winds of Hurricane Florence were so fierce that they caused a wheel of fortune to turn continuously in Virginia.

The tour at the Atlantic Fun Park on 15th Street in Virginia Beach was seen turning continuously as Florence made landfall with 90 mph winds in the early hours of Friday morning.

The wheel turned several times during a 10-second video that was posted online by a WVEC reporter.

Hurricane Florence was driving a wave of life-threatening storms several kilometers inland with the wind that destroyed buildings in its path.

The winds of Hurricane Florence were so fierce that they caused a wheel of fortune to turn continuously in Virginia

The winds of Hurricane Florence were so fierce that they caused a wheel of fortune to turn continuously in Virginia

The powerful storm has already flooded the coastal streets with ocean water and has left hundreds of thousands without electricity.

In Jacksonville, North Carolina, more than 60 people had to be removed from a collapsing hotel at the height of the storm, and many more who defied evacuation orders expected to be rescued.

Florence has already flooded coastal streets with ocean water and forecasters say that "catastrophic" freshwater floods are expected along waterways away from the Carolinas coast.

The thick winds tipped the trees to the ground and the raindrops flew to the side when Florence's leading edge moved into a long ranch along the coast.

Meteorologists said that this attack could last for days, leaving a large area under water, both heavy rains and rising seas.

The intensity of the storm remained at about 90 mph (144 kph), and it seemed that the north side of the eye was the most dangerous place where Florence moved to land.

The ride at the Atlantic Fun Park on 15th Street in Virginia Beach was continually turning when Florence made landfall

The ride at the Atlantic Fun Park on 15th Street in Virginia Beach was continually turning when Florence made landfall

The ride at the Atlantic Fun Park on 15th Street in Virginia Beach was continually turning when Florence made landfall

The National Hurricane Center said an indicator on Emerald Isle, North Carolina, reported 6.3 feet (1.92 meters) of flooding.

And about 46 miles up on the coast, in New Bern, some 150 people were waiting to be rescued from the floods on the Neuse River.

"Surviving this storm will be a test of endurance, teamwork, common sense and patience." The governor of North Carolina, Roy Cooper, warned, describing day after day the disastrous climate to come.

Cooper also requested additional federal disaster assistance in anticipation of what his office called "historic major damages" statewide.

Floods are observed in New Bern, North Carolina, after sudden storms caused the Neuse River to overflow on Thursday

Floods are observed in New Bern, North Carolina, after sudden storms caused the Neuse River to overflow on Thursday

Floods are observed in New Bern, North Carolina, after sudden storms caused the Neuse River to overflow on Thursday

More than 80,000 people were already without power when the storm began to shake the coast, and more than 12,000 were in shelters.

Another 400 people were in shelters in Virginia, where the predictions were less severe.

Authorities said some 1.7 million people in the Carolinas and Virginia were warned to evacuate, but it is unclear how many did.

Houses of approximately 10 million were under surveillance or warning due to hurricane conditions or tropical storms.

The coastal cities in the Carolinas were largely empty, and schools and businesses closed as far south as Georgia.

A sign warns people to leave Union Point Park after it was flooded by the Neuse River in New Bern, North Carolina.

A sign warns people to leave Union Point Park after it was flooded by the Neuse River in New Bern, North Carolina.

A sign warns people to leave Union Point Park after it was flooded by the Neuse River in New Bern, North Carolina.

Waves hits the Oceana Pier & Pier House restaurant in Atlantic Beach, North Carolina, as Hurricane Florence approaches the area on Thursday

Waves hits the Oceana Pier & Pier House restaurant in Atlantic Beach, North Carolina, as Hurricane Florence approaches the area on Thursday

Waves hits the Oceana Pier & Pier House restaurant in Atlantic Beach, North Carolina, as Hurricane Florence approaches the area on Thursday

Once a category 4 hurricane with winds of 140 mph (225 kph), the hurricane was demoted to a category 1 on Thursday night.

Meteorologists said that given the size of the storm and its slowness, it could cause epic damage similar to that seen in the Houston area during Hurricane Harvey just over a year ago, with flooding flooding homes and businesses and washing in waste sites. industrial and manure ponds.

The hurricane was seen as an important test for the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), which was harshly criticized for being slow and unprepared for Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico last year.

As Florence approached, President Donald Trump tweeted that FEMA and the first responders are "supplied and ready."

He also challenged the official conclusion that almost 3,000 people died in Puerto Rico, claiming that the figure was a Democratic plot to make it look bad.

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