The fearless Scots who attacked during the First World War in the battle for KILTS

The fascinating story of trench life for Highland soldiers, known as some of the fiercest warriors of the Great War, and the dangers of carrying a kilt in battle has been revealed in a series of stunning photos. .

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The brave Men of the Black Watch, proudly wearing their traditional Highland clothing during mainland Europe fights, are captured in images showing both the brotherhood of unity and the unfortunate tragedies of war.

A newly released collection of snaps includes a cheeky soldier who gazes admiring glances from French citizens and another soldier who grimly picks up an identity tag from his lifeless companion.

In the meantime, a light-hearted click shows the Men of the Black Watch celebrating New Year's Day with a bottle in hand, while roasting the loved ones hundreds of miles away.

Of all the nations involved in the horrific and exploited battle of the First World War, few could claim to have been hit as badly as Scotland.

More than 132,000 men and women made the ultimate sacrifice more than 100 years ago, paralyzing the Scottish community, especially in the small rural villages in the far north.

But despite the devastating loss of life, the Scottish or kilt-bearing regiments are often regarded as one of the fiercest and yet most cheerful of British tommies to fight in the front line.

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Soldiers of 8th Black Watch execute a bayonet attack at Bordon Camp in 1915. The brave Men of the Black Watch, who proudly put on their traditional Highland clothing during mainland Europe battles, are captured in images that both represent the brotherhood of the unity as the unfortunate show tragedies or confused

Soldiers of 8th Black Watch execute a bayonet attack at Bordon Camp in 1915. The brave Men of the Black Watch, who proudly put on their traditional Highland clothing during mainland Europe battles, are captured in images that both represent the brotherhood of the unity as the unfortunate show tragedies or confused

Men of the 16th Battalion C.E.F. (Canadian Scottish) to the front line on a photo dated September 27, 1918. Of all the countries involved in the horrific and exploited battle of the First World War, few could claim to have been hit as badly as Scotland, with an estimated 132,000 killed during the conflict

Men of the 16th Battalion C.E.F. (Canadian Scottish) to the front line on a photo dated September 27, 1918. Of all the countries involved in the horrific and exploited battle of the First World War, few could claim to have been hit as badly as Scotland, with an estimated 132,000 killed during the conflict

Men of the 16th Battalion C.E.F. (Canadian Scottish) to the front line on a photo dated September 27, 1918. Of all the countries involved in the horrific and exploited battle of the First World War, few could claim to have been hit as badly as Scotland, with an estimated 132,000 killed during the conflict

French citizens see a London Scottish soldier on L.O.C. tasks in 1914. Although many of the women in the photo seem to have been enchanted by the Scottish soldiers and their fascinating kilts, the young guy in the middle of the photo seems less than impressed

French citizens see a London Scottish soldier on L.O.C. tasks in 1914. Although many of the women in the photo seem to have been enchanted by the Scottish soldiers and their fascinating kilts, the young guy in the middle of the photo seems less than impressed

French citizens see a London Scottish soldier on L.O.C. tasks in 1914. Although many of the women in the photo seem to have been enchanted by the Scottish soldiers and their fascinating kilts, the young guy in the middle of the photo seems less than impressed

A soldier from the Royal Engineers who collects the identity disk from the wrist of a Highlander, killed by a bowl on the edge of a water-filled crater on an undated photo. Scotland received many casualties during the war, with more than 130,000 dead during the conflict

A soldier from the Royal Engineers who collects the identity disk from the wrist of a Highlander, killed by a bowl on the edge of a water-filled crater on an undated photo. Scotland received many casualties during the war, with more than 130,000 dead during the conflict

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A soldier from the Royal Engineers who collects the identity disk from the wrist of a Highlander, killed by a bowl on the edge of a water-filled crater on an undated photo. Scotland received many casualties during the war, with more than 130,000 dead during the conflict

During the Battle of the Somme, a piper from the 7th Seaforth Highlanders sends combative men back from the front after the attack on Longueval in a gripping photo dating from July 14, 1916. The image gives the exhausted men a low mud as they go back to the camp

During the Battle of the Somme, a piper from the 7th Seaforth Highlanders sends combative men back from the front after the attack on Longueval in a gripping photo dating from July 14, 1916. The image gives the exhausted men a low mud as they go back to the camp

During the Battle of the Somme, a piper from the 7th Seaforth Highlanders sends combative men back from the front after the attack on Longueval in a gripping photo dating from July 14, 1916. The image gives the exhausted men a low mud as they go back to the camp

In Thomas Greenshields & # 39; latest book Die Bloedige Kilts: The Highland Soldier in the Great War, the author tries to establish what really made the Highland soldier unique, and to what extent his experience was just the same as that of the ordinary soldier . Tommy.

The history of kilts worn during the fight

The use of kilts was first recorded in the 16th century, when it was a complete garment that enveloped the hull.

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The traditional kilt that we know today, covering the legs, emerged in the 18th century.

Since then, its use during wartime has been extensively documented, with the army and militias following the example and exchanging for the smaller kilt by 1800.

During the First World War, the kilted Highlanders were even known as & # 39; The Ladies from Hell & # 39; because of their flamboyant clothing.

& # 39; There is no monograph about the Highland soldier in the Great War, but there is a lot of mythology about the soldier from the Highlands & Greenshields explains.

& # 39; The centenary of the Great War is a good time to give a review. It is my intention in this review not to de-bunker the image of the Highland soldier, but to investigate reality and to subject mythology to a critical assessment in the process topic.

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& # 39; The intention is to offer a wart and all photos of the soldier from the Highlands and thus not to reduce him, but to show him in his essential humanity. & # 39 ;

From the beginning, Greenshields makes it clear that you don't have to be born in Scotland to get a & # 39; Shot & # 39; to be.

& # 39; In defining the Highland soldier, I have embraced all the kilted soldiers of Britain and the empire, including those of Canada and South Africa, & # 39; he added.

& # 39; I specifically included the kilted 6th and 9th Highland Light Infantry (H.L.I.) and 9th Royal Scots, but I do not have the non-kilted battalions of the H.L.I.

& # 39; Similarly, I have both Scottish London and Liverpool, but not the non-kilted Tyneside Scottish. I undoubtedly risk being a persona non grata in Glasgow and Newcastle. & # 39;

Men from 9th Royal Scots are pictured posing in their kilts. Some smoke cigarettes and pipes while others smile at the camera in a lighter moment during a long and violent war that engulfed men from all over the world.
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Men from 9th Royal Scots are pictured posing in their kilts. Some smoke cigarettes and pipes while others smile at the camera in a lighter moment during a long and violent war that engulfed men from all over the world.

Men from 9th Royal Scots are pictured posing in their kilts. Some smoke cigarettes and pipes while others smile at the camera in a lighter moment during a long and violent war that engulfed men from all over the world.

Scottish troops carrying an injured German on a stretcher during the Battle of the Menin Road Ridge, in a gripping photograph dating back to September 21, 1917. Despite the devastating loss of life, the Scottish or kilt-bearing regiments are often regarded as a of the proudest and yet often the happiest of British tommies to fight in the front line

Scottish troops carrying an injured German on a stretcher during the Battle of the Menin Road Ridge, in a gripping photograph dating back to September 21, 1917. Despite the devastating loss of life, the Scottish or kilt-bearing regiments are often regarded as a of the proudest and yet often the happiest of British tommies to fight in the front line

Scottish troops carrying an injured German on a stretcher during the Battle of the Menin Road Ridge, in a gripping photograph dating back to September 21, 1917. Despite the devastating loss of life, the Scottish or kilt-bearing regiments are often regarded as a of the proudest and yet often the happiest of British tommies to fight in the front line

Men of the Black Watch celebrates New Year's Day in the hutments on Henencourt, 1917. The Bloody Kilts, a new book by Thomas Greenshields, investigates the theory that Highlanders were better moral than other regiments, and contains a collection of rare images from the Great War

Men of the Black Watch celebrates New Year's Day in the hutments on Henencourt, 1917. The Bloody Kilts, a new book by Thomas Greenshields, investigates the theory that Highlanders were better moral than other regiments, and contains a collection of rare images from the Great War

Men of the Black Watch celebrates New Year's Day in the hutments on Henencourt, 1917. The Bloody Kilts, a new book by Thomas Greenshields, investigates the theory that Highlanders were better moral than other regiments, and contains a collection of rare images from the Great War

Highland soldiers from the Territorial Highland Division compete in a dance competition at a Highland Games in Bedford in 1915. That Bloody Kilts also looks at the role of pipers and bagpipes and their effect on morale in the front line and the economic and social backgrounds of the front line. typical Highland Soldier

Highland soldiers from the Territorial Highland Division compete in a dance competition at a Highland Games in Bedford in 1915. That Bloody Kilts also looks at the role of pipers and bagpipes and their effect on front-line morale and the economic and social backgrounds of the typical Highland Soldier

Highland soldiers from the Territorial Highland Division compete in a dance competition at a Highland Games in Bedford in 1915. That Bloody Kilts also looks at the role of pipers and bagpipes and their effect on morale in the front line and the economic and social backgrounds of the front line. typical Highland Soldier

Gordon Highlanders prepare barbed wire entanglements north of Arras for a photo of April 24, 1917. The kilts made the men the most recognized and distinctive of British expedition power

Gordon Highlanders prepare barbed wire entanglements north of Arras for a photo of April 24, 1917. The kilts made the men the most recognized and distinctive of British expedition power

Gordon Highlanders prepare barbed wire entanglements north of Arras for a photo of April 24, 1917. The kilts made the men the most recognized and distinctive of British expedition power

The Germans scale a church that is used as a hospital on the retreat from Bergen, according to an illustration by F. Matania during the First World War. Thomas Greenshields & Those Bloody Kilts: The Highland Soldier in the Great War, published by Helion and Company, is now available
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The Germans scale a church that is used as a hospital on the retreat from Bergen, according to an illustration by F. Matania during the First World War. Thomas Greenshields & Those Bloody Kilts: The Highland Soldier in the Great War, published by Helion and Company, is now available

The Germans scale a church that is used as a hospital on the retreat from Bergen, according to an illustration by F. Matania during the First World War. Thomas Greenshields & Those Bloody Kilts: The Highland Soldier in the Great War, published by Helion and Company, is now available

Soldiers from the Gordon Highlanders put on rubber thigh boots in a photo taken in Bazentin-le-Petit in November 1916. Kilt-wearing soldiers praised the usability of the item when it came to avoiding water

Soldiers from the Gordon Highlanders put on rubber thigh boots in a photo taken in Bazentin-le-Petit in November 1916. Kilt-wearing soldiers praised the usability of the item when it came to avoiding water

Soldiers from the Gordon Highlanders put on rubber thigh boots in a photo taken in Bazentin-le-Petit in November 1916. Kilt-wearing soldiers praised the usability of the item when it came to avoiding water

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